Navigation Links
Pregnant women at risk for unnecessary operations due to misdiagnosis of appendicitis
Date:10/24/2007

CHICAGO (October 24, 2007) New research published in the October issue of the Journal of the American College of Surgeons suggests that pregnant women suspected of having appendicitis are often misdiagnosed and undergo unnecessary appendectomies (removal of the appendix) that can result in early delivery or loss of the fetus. The study points to the need to require more accurate diagnosis to avoid unnecessary operations and the potential for fetal loss.

Appendicitis is difficult to diagnose in pregnant women, with signs and symptoms that are similar to those of pregnancy itself. Consequently, surgeons have historically taken an aggressive approach to the treatment of suspected appendicitis in pregnant women in order to reduce the risk and possible consequences of a ruptured appendix.

Our study shows that the complication rate in pregnant women who undergo a negative appendectomy is nearly identical to those who suffer a ruptured appendix, said Marcia L. McGory, MD, David Geffen School of Medicine, University of California at Los Angeles. This finding argues for a change in the basic approach to the treatment of suspected appendicitis in pregnant women. One potential straightforward solution is to use more advanced imaging tools, such as ultrasound and magnetic resonance imaging, to increase diagnostic accuracy.

This report presents findings from the largest study ever conducted to evaluate outcomes after appendectomy in pregnant women. Using data from a large, population-based database, this retrospective analysis included 94,789 women who underwent open or laparoscopic appendectomy, 3,133 of whom were pregnant. International Classification of Diseases Clinical Modification (ICD-CM) diagnosis codes were used to identify the presence of complicated (ruptured) or simple appendicitis.

The rate of negative appendectomy (defined as an appendectomy without a diagnosis of simple or complicated appendicitis) was significantly higher in pregnant women (23 percent versus 18 percent, p<0.05) than in non-pregnant women.

Overall, fetal loss or early delivery occurred in 11 percent of the 3,133 patients. Although the fetal loss rate was highest in patients undergoing appendectomy for complicated appendicitis (6 percent), it was still pronounced in patients undergoing appendectomy for a normal appendix (4 percent) and patients with simple appendicitis (2 percent). Appendectomy resulted in early delivery in 11 percent of patients with complicated appendicitis, 10 percent with a normal appendix and 4 percent with simple appendicitis.

The study also found that fetal loss rate after laparoscopic appendectomy in pregnant patients was significantly higher than that for open appendectomy (7 percent versus 3 percent, p<0.05). Laparoscopic appendectomy is sometimes performed because it is thought to be less invasive/traumatic for a pregnant patient.


'/>"/>

Contact: Sally Garneski
pressinquiry@facs.org
312-202-5409
Weber Shandwick Worldwide
Source:Eurekalert

Related biology news :

1. Pregnant women at higher risk for HIV, Uganda study finds
2. Screen all at risk for HIV, plus pregnant women
3. 100 percent of pregnant women have at least one kind of pesticide in their placenta
4. HIV and malaria combine to adversely affect pregnant women and their infants
5. Pregnant moms exposure to flu vaccine kick-starts fetal immune system
6. Male circumcision reduces risk of HIV transmission from women to men
7. Variation in womens X chromosomes may explain differences among individuals, between sexes
8. Of mice and mens (and womens) contraceptives
9. Survey reveals women and doctors arent talking about HPV
10. Men Estimate Mens Risks Of Common Disorders Higher Than Women Do, And Vice Versa
11. Higher risk for cervical cancer seen among women infected with multiple HPV types
Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:
(Date:4/26/2016)... LONDON , April 26, 2016 ... EdgeVerve Systems, a product subsidiary of Infosys (NYSE: ... a partnership to integrate the Onegini mobile security ... (Logo: http://photos.prnewswire.com/prnh/20151104/283829LOGO ) The ... enhanced security to access and transact across channels. ...
(Date:4/14/2016)... BioCatch ™, the global ... the appointment of Eyal Goldwerger as CEO. ... Goldwerger,s leadership appointment comes at a time of significant ... of its platform at several of the world,s largest ... unique cognitive and physiological factors, is a winner of ...
(Date:3/23/2016)... 23, 2016 ... Gesichts- und Stimmerkennung mit Passwörtern     ... MESG ), ein führender Anbieter digitaler ... mit SpeechPro zusammenarbeitet, um erstmals dessen Biometrietechnologie ... die Möglichkeit angeboten, im Rahmen mobiler Apps ...
Breaking Biology News(10 mins):
(Date:6/27/2016)... ... 2016 , ... Cancer experts from Austria, Hungary, Switzerland, and ... new and helpful biomarker for malignant pleural mesothelioma. Surviving Mesothelioma has just published ... , Biomarkers are components in the blood, tissue or body fluids that ...
(Date:6/27/2016)... , June 27, 2016  Liquid Biotech ... announced the funding of a Sponsored Research Agreement ... circulating tumor cells (CTCs) from cancer patients.  The ... in CTC levels correlate with clinical outcomes in ... These data will then be employed to support ...
(Date:6/24/2016)... ... 24, 2016 , ... While the majority of commercial spectrophotometers and fluorometers use ... 6000i models are higher end machines that use the more unconventional z-dimension of 20mm. ... from the bottom of the cuvette holder. , FireflySci has developed several Agilent ...
(Date:6/23/2016)... CAMBRIDGE, Mass. , June 23, 2016 /PRNewswire/ ... the development of novel compounds designed to target ... compound, napabucasin, has been granted Orphan Drug Designation ... in the treatment of gastric cancer, including gastroesophageal ... cancer stemness inhibitor designed to inhibit cancer stemness ...
Breaking Biology Technology: