Navigation Links
Possible drug target found for one of the most aggressive breast cancers
Date:7/8/2009

Grand Rapids, Mich. (July 8, 2009) Van Andel Research Institute (VARI) investigators have identified a gene that could be an important therapeutic target in the treatment of the most aggressive forms of breast cancer. Currently, patients with these cancers have few treatment options.

"Breast cancer mortality rates are actually declining, but the cancers that don't respond to traditional treatments tend to be more aggressive and have decreased survival rates," said VARI Research Scientist Carrie Graveel, Ph.D., lead author of the study published this week in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences U.S.A.

Researchers found that the Met gene may play a critical role in the development of an aggressive form of breast cancer known as basal breast cancer.

"Met has already been associated with decreased survival in breast cancer, but this study identifies its importance in specific types that can be distinguished at the molecular level," said VARI Distinguished Scientific Fellow George Vande Woude, Ph.D., who heads the laboratory that conducted the research.

In the 1980's, Dr. Vande Woude's laboratory at the National Cancer Institute demonstrated that inappropriate levels of Met occur in human tumors, and that cells with inappropriate Met signaling dramatically impact the spread of cancer. This signaling is implicated in most types of human cancers and high Met expression often correlates with poor prognosis.

"We found Met in the majority of breast cancers," said VARI Research Technician Jack DeGroot, another of the study's authors. "But levels were highest in aggressive types, making Met a promising drug target that could help patients that currently have few treatment options."

According to the American Cancer Society, breast cancers account for more than one in four cancers diagnosed in women in the United States. The National Cancer Institute estimates that 40,170 women in the U.S. will die from breast cancer in 2009.

"This very exciting work by the Van Andel Research Institute gives us a new target for treatment of patients with one of the worst types of breast cancer basal breast cancer," said Dr. Daniel D. Von Hoff, Physician-in Chief of the Translational Genomic Research Institute (TGen) in Phoenix, Arizona, which initiated an alliance with Van Andel Institute in February. "Since there are many new inhibitors of Met available for clinical trials, we now have a direct route for immediate application of these important findings in the care of patients with this very aggressive form of breast cancer."


'/>"/>

Contact: Joe Gavan
616-234-5390
Van Andel Research Institute
Source:Eurekalert

Related biology news :

1. New dinosaur species possible in Northwestern Alberta
2. Study validates means to measure possible leukemia marker
3. Bovine genome provides clues to possible new developments
4. Ultrasound imaging now possible with a smartphone
5. TGen researchers discover possible way to block the spread of deadly brain tumors
6. New high-throughput screening technique makes probing puzzling proteins possible
7. Peptides-on-demand: McGill researchers radical new green chemistry makes the impossible possible
8. A research work on molluscs nacre opens new doors for its possible use in biomedicine
9. Scientists unlock possible aging secret in genetically altered fruit fly
10. Control of blood vessels a possible weapon against obesity
11. Promising new drug being evaluated as possible treatment option for fragile X syndrome
Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:
(Date:6/20/2016)... DALLAS , June 20, 2016 ... criminal justice technology solutions for public safety, investigation, ... by the prisons involved, it has secured the ... Corrections (DOC) facilities for Managed Access Systems (MAS) ... (4) additional facilities to be installed by October, ...
(Date:6/15/2016)... New York , June 15, 2016 /PRNewswire/ ... a new market report titled "Gesture Recognition Market by ... and Forecast, 2016 - 2024". According to the report, ... USD 11.60 billion in 2015 and is estimated ... reach USD 48.56 billion by 2024.  ...
(Date:6/9/2016)... , June 9, 2016 ... Police deploy Teleste,s video security solution to ensure the safety ... France during the major tournament Teleste, ... communications systems and services, announced today that its video security ... to back up public safety across the country. ...
Breaking Biology News(10 mins):
(Date:6/23/2016)... (PRWEB) , ... June 23, 2016 , ... ... the release of its second eBook, “Clinical Trials Patient Recruitment and Retention Tips.” ... and retention in this eBook by providing practical tips, tools, and strategies for ...
(Date:6/23/2016)... June 23, 2016 Houston Methodist Willowbrook ... Cy-Fair Sports Association to serve as their official ... Houston Methodist Willowbrook will provide sponsorship support, athletic ... with association coaches, volunteers, athletes and families. ... Cy-Fair Sports Association and to bring Houston Methodist ...
(Date:6/23/2016)... ... June 23, 2016 , ... Supplyframe, the Industry Network ... Supplyframe Design Lab . Located in Pasadena, Calif., the Design Lab’s mission is ... projects are designed, built and brought to market. , The Design Lab is ...
(Date:6/23/2016)... Andrew D Zelenetz ... Published recently in Oncology ... touchONCOLOGY, Andrew D Zelenetz , discusses the ... is placing an increasing burden on healthcare systems ... With the patents on many biologics expiring, interest ...
Breaking Biology Technology: