Navigation Links
Popular blood type diet debunked
Date:1/15/2014

Researchers from the University of Toronto (U of T) have found that the theory behind the popular blood type diet--which claims an individual's nutritional needs vary by blood type--is not valid. The findings are published this week in PLoS One.

"Based on the data of 1,455 study participants, we found no evidence to support the 'blood-type' diet theory," said the senior author of the study, Dr. Ahmed El-Sohemy, Associate Professor and Canada Research Chair in Nutrigenomics at the U of T.

"The way an individual responds to any one of these diets has absolutely nothing to do with their blood type and has everything to do with their ability to stick to a sensible vegetarian or low-carbohydrate diet," said El-Sohemy.

Researchers found that the associations they observed between each of the four blood-type (A, B, AB, O) diets and the markers of health are independent of the person's blood type.

The 'blood-type' diet was popularized in the book Eat Right for Your Type, written by naturopath Peter D'Adamo. The theory behind the diet is that the ABO blood type should match the dietary habits of our ancestors and people with different blood types process food differently. According to the theory, individuals adhering to a diet specific to one's blood type can improve health and decrease risk of chronic illness such as cardiovascular disease. The book was a New York Times best-seller that has been translated into 52 languages and sold over 7 million copies.

The U of T researchers took an existing population of mostly young and healthy adults who provided detailed information about their usual diets and provided fasting blood that was used to isolate DNA to determine their ABO blood type and the level of cardiometabolic risk factors, such as insulin, cholesterol and triglycerides. Diet scores were calculated based on the food items listed in Eat Right for Your Type to determine relative adherence to each of the four 'blood-type' diets.

El-Sohemy says that a previous lack of scientific evidence doesn't mean the diets didn't work. "There was just no evidence, one way or the other. It was an intriguing hypothesis so we felt we should put it to the test. We can now be confident in saying that the blood type diet hypothesis is false." Last year, a comprehensive review published in the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition found no evidence to support the 'blood-type' diet and called for properly designed scientific studies to address it.


'/>"/>
Contact: Michael kennedy
m.kennedy@utoronto.ca
416-946-5025
University of Toronto
Source:Eurekalert

Related biology news :

1. American Chemical Society launches 2013 edition of popular Prized Science video series
2. Fat Loss Factor Review Gives Opinion of Popular Weight Loss Program
3. Popular energy drinks trigger caffeine jitters
4. Achilles heel: Popular drug-carrying nanoparticles get trapped in bloodstream
5. Misconceptions about a popular pet treat
6. For pre-teens, kindness may be key to popularity
7. Medbox Safe Storage and Access Lockers Gaining Popularity
8. ONR-funded research takes flight in Popular Science article
9. UNH research adds to mounting evidence against popular pavement sealcoat
10. Study breaks blood-brain barriers to understanding Alzheimers
11. In surprise finding, blood clots absorb bacterial toxin
Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:
(Date:11/29/2018)... KING OF PRUSSIA, Pa. (PRWEB) , ... November ... ... completed an equity investment in Semba Biosciences with the intention of acquiring full ... and an Equity Participation Agreement was executed on November 14, 2018. “We are ...
(Date:11/27/2018)... ... November 26, 2018 , ... uBiome, ... Founder of the website IBDwatch and Gastroenterology Fellow at the University of Louisville, ... from around the world, Dr. Wuerth will bring to uBiome knowledge and research ...
(Date:11/27/2018)... ... November 27, 2018 , ... Victrex has ... solution with a broader range of usage temperature compared to existing polymers such ... its new VICTREX CT™ 200 for dynamic sealing applications where gases such as ...
Breaking Biology News(10 mins):
(Date:11/13/2018)... ... November 12, 2018 , ... AseptiScope(TM), Inc. announces it ... U.S. studies, published last week, confirm pose a significant health risk. The ... conclude that stethoscopes are often improperly or rarely disinfected. In the AJIC November ...
(Date:11/13/2018)... ... November 13, 2018 , ... Aditya Humad, ... market last week that asserts it is still trending upward with growing valuations ... Humad’s analysis describes market consolidation, pricing pressure and increased competition as reasons often ...
(Date:11/13/2018)... ... November 13, 2018 , ... Sharon Kleyne, founder and new ... Pass, Oregon believes in the power of talk radio education Power of Water® ... the Power of Water® on talk radio every week with the “Sharon Kleyne ...
(Date:11/9/2018)... (PRWEB) , ... November 08, 2018 , ... ... Dr. Pablo Valenzuela, PhD, co-Founder, Chief Executive Officer and President of Andes Biotechnologies, ... from around the world, Dr. Valenzuela brings to uBiome expertise on the genetic ...
Breaking Biology Technology: