Navigation Links
Planting depth affects popular landscape tree

COLLEGE STATION, TXLandscape trees are increasingly being produced using container nursery systems rather than traditional field production practices. In contrast to field production techniques, successful container production requires a series of transplanting events in which trees are sequentially transferred to larger containers, a practice known as "potting-up" or "up-canning".

Problems can arise when trees are planted either too deep or too shallow at each up-canning. Variability in planting depth (the location of the root collar relative to soil surface, or grade), is of particular concern; optimum planting depth may vary among species and may be dependent on cultural practices and environmental conditions. A new study investigated transplanting practices during container production of the popular landscape tree lacebark elm.

"A lack of knowledge about the effects of common transplanting practices may lead to suboptimal performance of planted landscape trees. Our goal was to determine if transplanting practices during container production through two up-canning events would affect subsequent landscape performance", said Donita L. Bryan of the University of WisconsinPlatteville and corresponding author of the study. Bryan and colleagues from Texas A&M University conducted their experiments on lacebark elm (Ulmus parvifolia Jacq.), a landscape tree commonly used in urban environments. The study, published in HortScience, investigated effects of planting depth during two successive phases of container production (10.8 L and 36.6 L) and eventual landscape establishment.

The scientists tested whether trees that were initially planted with root collars below grade or above grade, then brought back to grade during successive up-canning or when placed in the landscape, performed as well as trees that were consistently planted with root collars at grade. The experiments also tested whether below-grade planting in containers would exacerbate any adverse effects of below-grade planting in the landscape.

The results showed that tree growth was greater when planted at grade during the initial container production phase and was reduced when planted 5 centimeters below grade. In the second container production phase, trees planted above grade showed reduced growth compared with trees planted at or below grade. During landscape establishment, transplanting at grade to slightly below or above grade produced trees with greater height on average when compared with planting below grade or substantially above grade.

"Correlations between initial growth and final growth in the field suggested that substantial deviations of the original root to shoot transition from at-grade planting was more of a factor in initial establishment of lacebark elm than the up-canning practices associated with planting depth during container production", the researchers concluded.


Contact: Michael W. Neff
American Society for Horticultural Science

Related biology news :

1. No consistent advantage for planting soybean early
2. Vidalia onions: Alternative to hand-transplanting proven effective
3. Search for salt tolerant grasses aims to improve roadside plantings
4. Implanting embryonic cardiac cells prevents arrhythmias
5. Planting carbon deep in the earth -- rather than the greenhouse
6. NTU researchers complete the worlds first in-depth study of the malaria parasite genome
7. Juvenile bluefin tunas can dive to depths of more than 1000 meters
8. How we see objects in depth: The brains code for 3-D structure
9. New technique sees into tissue at greater depth, resolution
10. Interdisciplinary volume on biological rhythms serves as both primer and in-depth resource
11. Black or blue? Mulch color affects okra growth, yield
Post Your Comments:
(Date:6/7/2016)... , June 7, 2016  Syngrafii Inc. ... a business relationship that includes integrating Syngrafii,s patented ... branch project. This collaboration will result in greater ... the credit union, while maintaining existing document workflow ... ...
(Date:6/2/2016)... , June 2, 2016 The ... has awarded the 44 million US Dollar project, for ... Embossed Vehicle Plates including Personalization, Enrolment, and IT Infrastructure ... leader in the production and implementation of Identity Management Solutions. ... January, however Decatur was selected for ...
(Date:6/2/2016)... , June 2, 2016 Perimeter ... Platforms, Unmanned Systems, Physical Infrastructure, Support & Other Service  ... visiongain offers comprehensive analysis of the global ... market will generate revenues of $17.98 billion in 2016. ... DVTEL Inc, a leader in software and hardware technologies ...
Breaking Biology News(10 mins):
(Date:6/23/2016)... 23, 2016 Apellis Pharmaceuticals, Inc. today ... trials of its complement C3 inhibitor, APL-2. The ... ascending dose studies designed to assess the safety, ... injection in healthy adult volunteers. Forty ... a single dose (ranging from 45 to 1,440mg) ...
(Date:6/23/2016)... , June 23, 2016 ... Hematology Review, 2016;12(1):22-8 ... , the peer-reviewed journal from touchONCOLOGY, Andrew ... escalating cost of cancer care is placing an ... result of expensive biologic therapies. With the patents ...
(Date:6/23/2016)... ... 23, 2016 , ... ClinCapture, the only free validated electronic ... showcase its product’s latest features from June 26 to June 30, 2016 for ... Disrupting Clinical Trials in The Cloud during the conference. DIA (Drug Information ...
(Date:6/23/2016)... ... June 23, 2016 , ... Velocity ... intelligent tools designed, tuned and optimized exclusively for Okuma CNC machining centers at ... result of a collaboration among several companies with expertise in toolholding, cutting tools, ...
Breaking Biology Technology: