Navigation Links
Plant stress paints early picture of drought
Date:12/5/2012

In July 2012, farmers in the U.S. Midwest and Plains regions watched crops wilt and die after a stretch of unusually low precipitation and high temperatures. Before a lack of rain and record-breaking heat signaled a problem, however, scientists observed another indication of drought in data from NASA and NOAA satellites: plant stress.

Healthy vegetation requires a certain amount of water from the soil every day to stay alive, and when soil moisture falls below adequate levels, plants become stressed. Scientists with the U.S. Department of Agriculture's Agricultural Research Service (USDA-ARS) have developed a way to use satellite data to map that plant stress. The maps could soon aid in drought forecasts, and prove useful for applications such as crop yield estimates or decisions about crop loss compensation.

"Crop drought monitoring is of high practical value, and any advance notice of drought conditions helps the farmer make practical decisions sooner," says Steve Running, an ecologist at University of Montana in Missoula.

A new animation of plant stress (top) shows how drought evolved across the United States from January 2010 through September 2012. In spring 2010, satellites measured cool leaf temperatures, indicating healthy plants and wetter-than-average conditions (green), over many areas across the country. By summer 2011, satellites saw the warming of stressed vegetation, indicating significantly lower-than-usual water availability (red) in many areas, most notably in Texas. Crops were either dead or would soon be dead.

Drought in 2012 was the most severe and extensive in at least 25 years, according to the USDA's Economic Research Service. By August 60 percent of farms were in areas experiencing drought, and by mid-September USDA had designated more than 2,000 counties as disaster areas. "2012 was record-breaking, this was just a huge event," says Martha Anderson with USDA-ARS in Beltsville, Md., who is working with a team to develop the plant stress indicator for drought and presented the research Dec. 5, at the American Geophysical Union meeting in San Francisco.

The 2012 event is what experts call a flash drought, meaning that it evolved quickly and unexpectedly. Low soil moisture was further depleted by the heat wave that started in May, and drought abruptly followed. By about May 5 the core regions of drought began to appear on the plant stress map earlier than the signs of drought appeared in other indicators, such as rainfall measurements.

"We think there's some early-warning potential with these plant stress maps, alerting us as the crops start to run out of water," Anderson says. Signals of plant stress may often appear first in satellite-derived maps of vegetation temperature before the crops have actually started to wilt and die. "The earlier we can learn things are turning south, presumably the more time we have to prepare for whatever actions might be taken."

For example, farmers may decide they need to buy supplemental feed from outside the drought-affected area to support their livestock, or they may need to adjust contract or insurance decisions.

The U.S. Drought Monitor already uses a combination of indices, such as rainfall, to describe drought conditions each week. The monitor currently does not include plant stress, but the potential is being explored. "Plant stress is one representation of drought impacts, and the drought monitoring community agrees that you can't do this with just one tool you need a lot of different tools," Anderson says.

Plant stress information has the potential to improve the skill of existing forecasts that predict drought out to weeks or months. Also, because the plant stress information is derived from satellites, it can describe drought conditions in areas where rain gauge and radar networks are sparse -- and it can do so at the scale of individual fields.

To produce the maps of plant stress, scientists start with the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) on NASA's Terra and Aqua satellites. Images are processed to distinguish between land surfaces covered by soil and surfaces covered with vegetation.

Narrowing their focus to vegetated areas, scientists set out to measure moisture availability. Plants cool themselves by sweating water extracted from the soil by their roots. When access to water is limited, plants lessen their consumption and reduce evapotranspiration from leaf surfaces. As a result, leaves heat up and produce an elevated leaf or canopy temperature, which can be detected by thermal sensors on NOAA's geostationary weather satellites. Hotter plants imply limited water in the soil.

"This is not a drought forecast. It's a map of what's going on right now," Anderson says. "Is there more or less water than usual?"

What is "usual" or normal, however, can depend on the season or even the year. Scientists currently define normal by calculating and mapping plant stress averaged over periods of 1-3 months, from the start of MODIS data collection in 2000 to present. The mean of these historic maps is considered normal. Compare a current map with the longer-term "normal" map, and scientists get a picture of the magnitude by which current conditions deviate from normal.

"What was normal back in 1920 is not what's normal now, so the more years we have under the belt the better we can define normal," Anderson says. "But this year is so far out of line with respect to previous years, it is unusual regardless of the period of record used as the baseline."


'/>"/>

Contact: Kathryn Hansen
kathryn.h.hansen@nasa.gov
301-286-1046
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center
Source:Eurekalert  

Related biology news :

1. The future of plant science - a technology perspective
2. The future of plant science a technology perspective
3. Bone marrow transplant arrests symptoms in model of Rett syndrome
4. American Society of Plant Biologists honors early career women scientists
5. Not just for the birds: Man-made noise has ripple effects on plants, too
6. Plant DNA speaks English, identifies new species
7. Human noise has ripple effects on plants
8. New databases harvest a rich bounty of information on crop plant metabolism
9. Plant research reveals new role for gene silencing protein
10. Plants mimic scent of pollinating beetles
11. Stomata development in plants unraveled -- a valuable discovery for environmental research
Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:
Related Image:
Plant stress paints early picture of drought
(Date:2/8/2017)... , Feb. 7, 2017 Report Highlights ... by 2021 from $8.3 billion in 2016 at a ... to 2021. Report Includes - An overview of ... market trends, with data from 2015 and 2016, and ... - Segmentation of the market on the basis of ...
(Date:2/7/2017)... Feb. 7, 2017 Zimmer Biomet Holdings, Inc. ... healthcare, will present at the LEERINK Partners 6th Annual ... Hotel on Wednesday, February 15, 2017 at 10 a.m. ... the presentation can be accessed at http://wsw.com/webcast/leerink28/zbh .  ... conference via Zimmer Biomet,s Investor Relations website at ...
(Date:2/6/2017)... 2017 According to Acuity Market Intelligence, ... authorities to continue to embrace biometric and digital ... Automated Border Control (ABC) eGates and 1436 Automated ... than 163 ports of entry across the globe. ... a combined CAGR of 37%. APC Kiosks reached ...
Breaking Biology News(10 mins):
(Date:2/24/2017)... ... , ... Chef Jodi Abel has returned from her three-week tour through ... gained a number of delicious recipes and new techniques to share with her Lajollacooks4u ... Cape province. It is internationally renowned for its incredible wine farms, beautiful environment, ...
(Date:2/24/2017)... Feb. 24, 2017 Symic Bio, a biopharmaceutical ... new category of therapeutics, announced today the completion of ... peripheral artery disease. The trial will evaluate the safety ... in the reduction of restenosis following angioplasty. ... milestone for SB-030," said Nathan Bachtell , M.D., ...
(Date:2/24/2017)... ... February 24, 2017 , ... FireflySci, Inc is an ... late 2014, FireflySci had the goal of bringing their powerful cuvette and ... shape the path that FireflySci is going on as they add yet another mark ...
(Date:2/24/2017)... 24, 2017  OncoSec Medical Incorporated ("OncoSec") (NASDAQ: ONCS), ... a Key Opinion Leader event to highlight new clinical ... poster presentation at the upcoming 2017 ASCO-SITC Immuno-Oncology Symposium ... will be held in-person and via live webcast on ... AM PST at the Lotte New York Palace Hotel ...
Breaking Biology Technology: