Navigation Links
Pfizer shows support for open access
Date:5/5/2009

Pfizer today announced details of a membership agreement with BioMed Central to cover publication costs for research articles published by its researchers.

Pfizer's BioMed Central membership arrangement means that Pfizer will centrally cover the publication fees for any researcher employed or funded by Pfizer when they submit a research article to one of BioMed Central's 190+ peer-reviewed open access journals. By funding open access publication fees in this way, Pfizer aims to make it as straightforward as possible for its researchers to make their research results universally accessible.

Matthew Cockerill, BioMed Central's Managing Director, noted "Many of the world's largest government and private research funders, including the National Institutes of Heath, the Howard Hughes Medical Institute and the Wellcome Trust, have already put in place policies to ensure open access to the results of the their research funding. This new agreement between BioMed Central and Pfizer demonstrates that the pharmaceutical industry also recognizes the benefits of open access."


'/>"/>

Contact: Matt McKay
matthew.mckay@biomedcentral.com
44-020-319-22216
BioMed Central
Source:Eurekalert

Page: 1

Related biology news :

1. Pfizer supports open access publishing for researchers in low-income countries
2. Pfizer inks global license to Genomatix Software and databases
3. Scripps Research discovery leads to broad potential applications in CovX-Pfizer deal
4. New technology shows promise against resistant staph infections
5. Satellite imagery shows fragile Wilkins Ice Shelf destabilized
6. Microparticle immune response modifier shows broad effects against recurrent or metastatic cancer
7. Lab study shows THC exposure as adolescents linked to negative effects of THC as adults
8. New drug shows promise in treating drug-resistant prostate cancer
9. Novel lung cancer vaccine shows promise in fighting early-stage lung cancer
10. Brain building: Study shows brain growth tied to cell division in mouse embryos
11. Scots and Irish at greater risk of drink-related death, study shows
Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:
(Date:6/4/2019)... ... 04, 2019 , ... Harper was three years old when her owners took ... which caused painful osteoarthritis in the joints. She was referred to a veterinary ... The surgical specialist, Dr. Christopher Eich of Southern California Veterinary Specialty Hospital , ...
(Date:6/3/2019)... ... , ... Stay on top of current hot topics through free webinars presented ... webinars is free, so be sure to register today to save your place! Participate ... to see our upcoming webinars: , CLINICAL TRIALS , June 10 – A Novel ...
(Date:5/31/2019)... , ... May 30, 2019 , ... ... testing company, and Mayo Clinic, have documented significant differences in the prevalence of ... and ethnic populations compared to non-Hispanic White women. Results will be presented at ...
Breaking Biology News(10 mins):
(Date:6/11/2019)... ... June 11, 2019 , ... ... from human mesenchymal stem cells (MSC-EV) are able to incorporate into human CD34+ ... a test on mice, MSC-EVs also increased the cells’ ability to lodge into ...
(Date:5/31/2019)... ... 29, 2019 , ... For many years, the primary forms of cancer treatment ... therapies. Advances in immuno-oncology have led to the advent of Chimeric Antigen Receptor T ... cell receptors known as “CARs”. The CAR enables the final product to produce chemicals ...
(Date:5/31/2019)... ... May 30, 2019 , ... World Compliance Seminars today ... 08-09, 2019 in Boston, MA. This peer recommended interactive workshop is always selected ... training will kick off with a compendial treatment of Data Integrity fundamentals. After ...
(Date:5/31/2019)... ... 30, 2019 , ... A study released today in STEM ... the sustained release of human placental stem cell (HPSC)-derived conditioned medium (CM) to ... CM into the injured kidney, where it helped restore function and regenerate injured ...
Breaking Biology Technology: