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Pfizer shows support for open access
Date:5/5/2009

Pfizer today announced details of a membership agreement with BioMed Central to cover publication costs for research articles published by its researchers.

Pfizer's BioMed Central membership arrangement means that Pfizer will centrally cover the publication fees for any researcher employed or funded by Pfizer when they submit a research article to one of BioMed Central's 190+ peer-reviewed open access journals. By funding open access publication fees in this way, Pfizer aims to make it as straightforward as possible for its researchers to make their research results universally accessible.

Matthew Cockerill, BioMed Central's Managing Director, noted "Many of the world's largest government and private research funders, including the National Institutes of Heath, the Howard Hughes Medical Institute and the Wellcome Trust, have already put in place policies to ensure open access to the results of the their research funding. This new agreement between BioMed Central and Pfizer demonstrates that the pharmaceutical industry also recognizes the benefits of open access."


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Contact: Matt McKay
matthew.mckay@biomedcentral.com
44-020-319-22216
BioMed Central
Source:Eurekalert

Page: 1

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