Navigation Links
Penn research identifies potential mechanisms for future anti-obesity drugs
Date:3/3/2011

PHILADELPHIA An interdisciplinary group of researchers at the University of Pennsylvania has, for the first time, identified the neurological and cellular signaling mechanisms that contribute to satiety the sensation of feeling full and the subsequent body-weight loss produced by drugs used to treat type 2 diabetes. More comprehensive knowledge of these mechanisms could form the basis for anti-obesity medications.

The group was led by Matthew Hayes of the School of Medicine's Psychiatry Department, Harvey Grill of the Psychology Department in the School of Arts and Sciences and Kendra Bence of the School of Veterinary Medicine's Animal Biology Department. Their research was aided by a team of postdoctoral and doctoral fellows, as well as technicians and undergraduate students at Penn.

The study was published in the March 2 edition of the journal Cell Metabolism.

While no pharmaceutical treatment for obesity currently exists, type 2 diabetes drugs targeting the hormone glucagon-like-peptide-1, or GLP-1, for insulin production may hold promise. These drugs were known to promote weight loss, simply as a result of patients eating less. Researchers, however, could not explain exactly what caused this change in behavior.

Naturally occurring GLP-1 is made in primarily two distinct locations in the body, the gut and the brain. Much of the previous research in this area has focused on the former at the expense of the latter when attempting to identify the relevant population of GLP-1 receptors that may mediate the suppression in food intake by pharmaceutical GLP-1 drugs.

"Identifying both the site-of-action and mechanisms that accounts for the body weight loss of these GLP-1 drugs puts us one step closer to developing effective, FDA-approved, treatments for obesity," Hayes said.

"Ignoring the brain is not the right strategy, as these drugs are certainly engaging multiple, distributed centers in the brain governing energy balance regulation," Grill said.

The Penn group not only identified a necessary part of the brain which mediates the food intake suppression effect produced by these drugs, the nucleus tractus solitarius, or NTS, but also the cellular signaling pathways required for production of GLP-1's satiety effects.

"GLP-1's ability to alter these specific signaling pathways within the NTS of the brainstem may account for the suppression in food intake and body weight by altering the long-term neurochemistry and connectivity of this region of the brain with higher-order brain centers that also regulate energy balance," Bence said.

Many researchers have tried to determine precisely how GLP-1 and other satiating signals work, especially since in obese individuals, the brain fails to correctly perceive and respond to naturally occurring energy balance signals from the body. This faulty signaling underscores the importance of pharmacological treatments, such as the long-acting GLP-1 drugs that are effective in engaging brain signaling to reduce excessive food intake and possibly obesity.

That the Penn researchers were able to demonstrate a potential neurochemical mechanism of weight loss for a class of drugs already used in the treatment of type 2 diabetes provides a missing piece of the puzzle for future FDA-approved anti-obesity drugs.

"If we can identify other chemical signals or hormones that act on the same pathways that we've shown here, then by combined action you have a coordinated, orchestrated symphony of weight suppression," Hayes said.


'/>"/>

Contact: Evan Lerner
elerner@upenn.edu
215-573-6604
University of Pennsylvania
Source:Eurekalert

Related biology news :

1. Scripps oceanography researchers discover arctic blooms occurring earlier
2. Nature study: Jefferson researchers unravel proteins elusive role in embryo and disease development
3. York U researchers uncovering how ovarian cancer resists chemotherapy
4. Research shows how bacteria communicate with each other
5. Researchers predict age of T cells to improve cancer treatment
6. Stem cell study could aid motor neurone disease research
7. Researchers looking at a rare disease make breakthrough that could benefit everyone
8. Silk moths antenna inspires new nanotech tool with applications in Alzheimers research
9. Researchers develop curious snapshot of powerful retinal pigment and its partners
10. Winners to share $1 million prize in Office of Naval Research challenge
11. 20 researchers selected as 2011 Leopold Leadership Fellows
Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:
(Date:2/2/2016)... , Feb. 2, 2016   Parabon ... from the U.S. Army Research Office and the ... range and sensitivity of the company,s Snapshot ... Accounting Mission and, more generally, defense-related DNA forensics. ... phenotyping capabilities (predicting appearance and ancestry from DNA ...
(Date:2/1/2016)... , Feb. 1, 2016  Wocket® smart wallet ( www.wocketwallet.com ) announces ... personality, Joey Fatone . Las Vegas , ... --> Las Vegas , where Joey appeared ... The new video ad was filmed at the Consumer Electronics Show ... the Wocket booth to meet and greet fans. ...
(Date:1/25/2016)...  Glencoe Software, the world-leading supplier of image data ... provide the data management solution OMERO Plus for the ... Photo - http://photos.prnewswire.com/prnh/20160125/325328LOGO ... Phenotypic analysis measures the characteristics and behavior of ... states such as health and disease, the presence or ...
Breaking Biology News(10 mins):
(Date:2/12/2016)... ... 12, 2016 , ... The Pittcon 2016 Exposition, which takes ... include 848 exhibitors (count as of February 9) of which 119 are first ... by the scientific community in industrial, academic, and government labs. The Exposition will ...
(Date:2/12/2016)... 12, 2016  PTC Therapeutics, Inc. (NASDAQ: ... (Strategies to Realize Innovation, Vision and Empowerment) grant ... provides funds to patient advocacy organizations to develop ... contributions to the rare disease community by increasing ... patient advocates. Mary Frances Harmon ...
(Date:2/11/2016)... , February 11, 2016 Non-profit Consortium ... Genetic Understanding to Support Research and Discovery ... today announced an ambitious plan to sequence 100,000 individuals. It ... countries and at least 7 of North and East Asian ... the first phase, the project will focus on creating phased ...
(Date:2/11/2016)... 2016  Vermillion, Inc. (NASDAQ: VRML ), a ... the formation of the Steering Committee for its Pelvic ... --> Pelvic masses can present physicians and healthcare ... pregnancy is ruled out, pelvic masses may include cancers ... benign ovarian tumors and gastrointestinal and urinary tract masses. ...
Breaking Biology Technology: