Navigation Links
Paddlefish's doubled genome may question theories on limb evolution
Date:8/7/2012

SAN FRANCISCO, August 7, 2012 -- The American paddlefish -- known for its bizarre, protruding snout and eggs harvested for caviar -- duplicated its entire genome about 42 million years ago, according to a new study published in the journal Genome Biology and Evolution. This finding may add a new twist to the way scientists study how fins evolved into limbs since the paddlefish is often used as a proxy for a more representative ancestor shared by humans and fishes.

"We found that paddlefish have had their own genome duplication," said Karen Crow, assistant professor of biology at San Francisco State University. "This creates extra genetic material that adds complexity to comparative studies. It may change the way we interpret studies on limb development."

In order to study how human limbs develop, scientists compare the limb-building genes found in mice with fin-building genes found in fishes. Previous research on paddlefish has suggested that fishes possessed the genetic toolkit required to grow limbs long before the evolution of the four-limbed creatures (tetrapods) that developed into reptiles, birds, amphibians and mammals.

In the last decade, paddlefish have become a useful benchmark in evolutionary studies because their position on the evolutionary tree makes them a reasonably good proxy for the ancestor of the bony fishes that evolved into tetrapods such as humans. However, the fact that paddlefish underwent a genome duplication could complicate what its genes tell us about the fin-to-limb transition, says Crow.

"Our findings suggest that the results of previous studies using paddlefish as a comparative species may need to be re-interpreted," Crow said.

Crow and colleagues sequenced chromosomal regions containing 19 Hox genes in the American paddlefish. Hox genes determine body shape and limb development, and have become prime candidates for detecting whole genome duplications.

Whole genome duplications are game-changing events in evolutionary history that give rise to new species or novel features within a species. They occur when a series of unlikely circumstances coincide, resulting in twin copies of every gene. When this happens, one scenario that could take place is that one gene in the pair keeps its designated function while the other is either lost or takes on a new purpose.

"This extra genetic material provides the canvas for evolution to paint with," said Crow, who studies the evolution of novelty and diversity.

Two milestone genome duplications are believed to have taken place before the evolution of jawed vertebrates. Additional whole genome duplications have also taken place further down the evolutionary tree, in specific lineages or branches, but it is a phenomenon more common in plants than animals.

"Our findings on the paddlefish suggest that whole duplication is not as uncommon in animals as previously thought," Crow said.


'/>"/>
Contact: Elaine Bible
ebible@sfsu.edu
415-405-3606
San Francisco State University
Source:Eurekalert  

Related biology news :

1. Leading evolutionary scientist to discuss how genome of bacteria has evolved
2. Darwin in the genome
3. Analysis of stickleback genome sequence catches evolution in action
4. Athletic frogs have faster-changing genomes
5. PNAS: Precise molecular surgery in the plant genome
6. BGI and Aspera collaborate on high-speed data exchange to advance genome research
7. Researchers announce GenomeSpace environment to connect genomic tools
8. UC Santa Cruz builds national data center for cancer genome research
9. BGI reports the completed sequence of foxtail millet genome
10. Relative reference: Foxtail millet offers clues for assembling the switchgrass genome
11. Maps of Miscanthus genome offer insight into grass evolution
Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:
Related Image:
Paddlefish's doubled genome may question theories on limb evolution
(Date:3/22/2017)... , March 21, 2017   Neurotechnology , ... recognition technologies, today announced the release of the ... which provides improved facial recognition using up to ... a single computer. The new version uses deep ... accuracy, and it utilizes a Graphing Processing Unit ...
(Date:3/22/2017)... Calif. , March 21, 2017 ... analytics company serving law enforcement agencies, announced today the ... as director of public safety business development. ... diversified law enforcement experience, including a focus on the ... In his most recent position, Mr. Sheridan served as ...
(Date:3/20/2017)... PMD Healthcare announces the release of its ... System (WMS), a remote, real-time lung health monitoring and ... is a Medical Device, Digital Health, and Chronic Care ... innovative solutions that empower people to improve their healthcare ... developed the first ever personal spirometer, Spiro PD, which ...
Breaking Biology News(10 mins):
(Date:3/23/2017)... LOUISVILLE, Colo. , March 23, 2017  GlobeImmune, ... purchase agreement for the sale of 12,835,490 shares of ... the  NantWorks  ecosystem of companies. In connection with the sale ... GlobeImmune $100,000 in cash and issue to GlobeImmune 200,000 ... common stock. "We are pleased to ...
(Date:3/23/2017)... -- NetworkNewsWire Editorial Coverage  ... Cancer remains one of the ... care systems, in terms of costs and resources. However, as ... development of innovative and efficient therapies that demonstrate higher chances ... of cancer treatments, a growing number of patients receiving immuno-oncology ...
(Date:3/23/2017)... Orleans, La. (PRWEB) , ... March 23, 2017 ... ... real-time, industrial monitoring solutions, today announced the hire of Dr. Sigmund “Sig” Floyd ... APMT customer applications, strategic partnerships and joint development activities. , “Dr. Floyd’s career ...
(Date:3/22/2017)... , March 22, 2017  UBM and ... to announce their extended partnership and the third ... headlined by the 21 st Annual MassMEDIC ... taking place May 3-4, 2017. ... Technology Association (ADVAMED) President and CEO, Scott ...
Breaking Biology Technology: