Navigation Links
Overexpression of splicing protein in skin repair causes early changes seen in skin cancer
Date:1/19/2014

Cold Spring Harbor, NY Normally, tissue injury triggers a mechanism in cells that tries to repair damaged tissue and restore the skin to a normal, or homeostatic state. Errors in this process can give rise to various problems, such as chronic inflammation, which is a known cause of certain cancers.

"It has been noted that cancer resembles a state of chronic wound healing, in which the wound-healing program is erroneously activated and perpetuated," says Professor Adrian Krainer of Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory (CSHL). In a paper published today in Nature Structural & Molecular Biology, a team led by Dr. Krainer reports that a protein they show is normally involved in healing wounds and maintaining homeostasis in skin tissue is also, under certain conditions, a promoter of invasive and metastatic skin cancers.

The protein, called SRSF6, is what biologists call a splicing factor: it is one of many proteins involved in an essential cellular process called splicing. In splicing, an RNA "message" copied from a gene is edited so that it includes only the portions needed to instruct the cell how to produce a specific protein. The messages of most genes can be edited in multiple ways, using different splicing factors; thus, a single gene can give rise to multiple proteins, with distinct functions.

The SRSF6 protein, while normally contributing to wound healing in skin tissue, when overproduced can promote abnormal growth of skin cells and cancer, Krainer's team demonstrated in experiments in mice. Indeed, they determined the spot on a particular RNA message one that encodes the protein tenascin C where SRSF6 binds abnormally, giving rise to alternate versions of the tenascin C protein that are seen in invasive and metastatic cancers.

The CSHL team also found that overproduction of SRSF6 in mice results in the depletion of a type of stem cell called Lgr6+. These skin stem cells reside in the upper part of the hair follicle and participate in wound healing when tissue is damaged. Thus, aberrant alternative splicing by SRSF6 on the one hand increases cell proliferation, but on the other hand prevents the process by which proliferating cells mature. "The cells remain in an abnormal activation state that would otherwise be temporary during normal tissue repair. More studies are needed to understand this phenomenon in detail," says Mads Jensen, Ph.D., first author of the new paper who performed the experiments as a postdoctoral researcher in the Krainer lab.


'/>"/>

Contact: Peter Tarr
tarr@cshl.edu
516-367-8455
Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory
Source:Eurekalert  

Related biology news :

1. Overexpression of cytoglobin gene increases neuronal hypoxic tolerance
2. OGIs investment in cytognomix contributes to the Shannon Human Splicing Pipelines success
3. Team uses antisense technology that exploits gene splicing mechanism to kill cancer cells
4. Lariats: How RNA splicing decisions are made
5. Next-gen reappraisal of interactions within a cancer-associated protein complex
6. Researchers pursuing arthritis protein
7. Some motor proteins cooperate better than others
8. Tiny proteins have outsized influence on nerve health
9. Mass spectrometer detection of 10 protein spots after acute high-altitude HBI
10. How does Rho-associated protein kinase modulate neurite extension?
11. Activating P300 protein contributes to repair of hippocampal neuronal DNA injuries
Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:
Related Image:
Overexpression of splicing protein in skin repair causes early changes seen in skin cancer
(Date:2/3/2016)... 3, 2016 Vigilant Solutions announces today that ... Missouri solved two recent hit-and-run ... data from Vigilant Solutions. Brian Wenberg ... the victim was walking out of a convenience store and witnessed an elderly ... his vehicle, striking his vehicle and leaving the scene.  ...
(Date:2/2/2016)... Feb. 2, 2016 This BCC Research ... market by reviewing the recent advances in high ... drive the field forward. Includes forecast through 2019. ... the challenges and opportunities that exist in the ... solution developers, as well as IT and bioinformatics ...
(Date:2/2/2016)... Feb. 2, 2016   Parabon NanoLabs ... U.S. Army Research Office and the Defense Forensics ... sensitivity of the company,s Snapshot Kinship Inference ... and, more generally, defense-related DNA forensics.  Although Snapshot ... (predicting appearance and ancestry from DNA evidence), it ...
Breaking Biology News(10 mins):
(Date:2/9/2016)... Feb. 9, 2016  DNAtrix, a clinical ... cancer, announced that its lead product, DNX-2401, ... as an orphan medicinal product for the ... of glioma, strikes approximately 25,000 people a ... http://photos.prnewswire.com/prnh/20160208/330986LOGO --> ...
(Date:2/9/2016)... , Feb. 9, 2016 ... Inhibitors-Pipeline Insights, 2016", report provides in depth ... development activities around the Protein-Tyrosine Phosphatase 1B ... product profiles in various stages of development ... II, Phase III and Preregistration. Report covers ...
(Date:2/8/2016)... 2016 Novan, Inc. today announced that Director Robert ... Directors of Novan. In addition, Robert Keegan has been ... Carolina . --> North Carolina ... received a total of $32.8 million of net proceeds in a ... network originating throughout the Research Triangle area of North ...
(Date:2/8/2016)... , ... February 08, 2016 , ... ... and leading supplier of Semantic Graph Database technology, today announced the availability of ... of Cloudera Enterprise through the Cloudera Certified Technology Program (CCPT). AllegroGraph ...
Breaking Biology Technology: