Navigation Links
Oncologists: How to talk with your pathologist about cancer molecular testing
Date:6/1/2014

As targeted therapies become more available, increasing opportunity exists to match treatments to the genetics of a specific cancer. But in order to make this match, oncologists have to know these genetics. This requires molecular testing of patient samples. An education session presented today at the American Society for Clinical Oncology (ASCO) Annual Meeting 2014 details the challenges in this process and makes recommendations that oncologists can use to ensure their patients' samples are properly tested, helping to pair patients with the best possible treatments.

"The problem is there are lot of technical, logistical steps involved in the process of obtaining and molecularly testing patient samples and each step is a place where things can go wrong," says Dara Aisner, MD, PhD, investigator at the CU Cancer Center and molecular pathologist at the CU School of Medicine. The nature of tissue samples and molecular testing means that miscommunications or mistakes can ultimately render a sample unusable.

For example, Aisner points out that the mechanics of some pathology labs dictates that biopsies performed on a Friday may sit in the preservative formalin until Sunday evening fine for microscopy but potentially detrimental for molecular testing. Or, Aisner says, bone biopsies are commonly treated with decalcification solution to make the sample pliable enough to be cut another technique that negates molecular testing. Or a small sample may be used up during immunohistochemistry testing that may come first in a pathology lab workflow unless mechanisms are put into place to specifically prioritize molecular testing over other evaluations.

"A pathology lab is a high volume environment that's optimized to treat all samples the same way, according to the same protocols. If every time you want molecular testing to be the priority, you have to call and make special arrangements, it can be disruptive. The best solution for oncologists and pathology labs is to set up new norms designed to meet the needs of molecular testing, which is quickly becoming the new paradigm," Aisner says.

Aisner suggests close communication, systems approaches, keeping special requests to a minimum, and patience on the part of requesting oncologists. The key, she says, is writing new institutional protocols to keep pace with the new reliance on molecular testing.

"Oncologists and pathologists both know that molecular testing is becoming an essential piece of cancer care," Aisner says. "The question now is how to best implement this testing in an efficient way that leads to the least disruption and best patient outcomes."


'/>"/>

Contact: Erika Matich
erika.matich@ucdenver.edu
University of Colorado Denver
Source:Eurekalert

Related biology news :

1. Clemson plant pathologist working to raise cucurbit yields, lower production costs
2. What can plants reveal about gene flow? That its an important evolutionary force
3. Intuitions about the causes of rising obesity are often wrong, researchers report
4. Male infertility: Its all about the package
5. Leading cfaed scientists organize international workshop about DNA-based microchips
6. Reconstructed ancient ocean reveals secrets about the origin of life
7. The human food connection: A new study reveals more about our relationship to food
8. What songbirds tell us about how we learn
9. Elevating geosciences in the southeastern US: New ideas about old terranes
10. Neck ribs in woolly mammoths provide clues about their decline and eventual extinction
11. What singing fruit flies can tell us about quick decisions
Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:
(Date:5/16/2017)... DALLAS , May 16, 2017   ... for health organizations, and MD EMR Systems ... certified development partner for GE, have established a ... Patient Portal product and the GE Centricity™ products, ... Centricity EMR. These new integrations ...
(Date:4/24/2017)... Janice Kephart , former 9/11 ... Partners, LLP (IdSP) , today issues the following ... March 6, 2017 Executive Order: Protecting the ... be instilled with greater confidence, enabling the reactivation ... applications are suspended by until at least July ...
(Date:4/18/2017)... 18, 2017  Socionext Inc., a global expert in SoC-based imaging ... server, the M820, which features the company,s hybrid codec technology. A ... Tera Probe, Inc., will be showcased during the upcoming Medtec Japan ... at the Las Vegas Convention Center April ... Click here for ...
Breaking Biology News(10 mins):
(Date:10/9/2017)... ... October 09, 2017 , ... At its national board ... Stubbs, a professor in Harvard University’s Departments of Physics and Astronomy, has been selected ... member of the winning team for the 2015 Breakthrough Prize in Fundamental physics for ...
(Date:10/9/2017)... ... October 09, 2017 , ... ... medical journal, Epilepsia, Brain Sentinel’s SPEAC® System which uses the surface electromyography ... generalized tonic-clonic seizures (GTCS) using surface electromyography (sEMG). The prospective multicenter phase ...
(Date:10/7/2017)... ... October 06, 2017 , ... ... launched its ProxiMeta™ Hi-C metagenome deconvolution product, featuring the first commercially available ... bioinformatics software to perform Hi-C metagenome deconvolution using their own facilities, supplementing ...
(Date:10/6/2017)... Mass. (PRWEB) , ... October 06, 2017 , ... ... female entrepreneurship within the healthcare and technology sector at their fourth annual Conference ... panels featuring 30 inspiring speakers and the ELEVATE pitch competition showcasing early stage ...
Breaking Biology Technology: