Navigation Links
Novel discovery by NUS scientists paves the way for more effective treatment of cancers
Date:5/21/2012

A team of scientists from the National University of Singapore's (NUS) Department of Biological Sciences and Mechanobiology Institute have discovered how a drug-led compound a compound that is undergoing preclinical trials as a potential drug can deprive cancer cells of energy and stop them from growing into a tumour. This drug-led compound is named BPTES.

This is the first time a research group has provided evidence showing how a drug-lead compound suppresses tumour formation.

Building on the new findings, the NUS team also derived positive results for a novel dual-drug treatment regime involving BPTES that kills kidney and breast cancer cells more effectively.

The team led by Associate Professor Low Boon Chuan and Associate Professor Jayaraman Sivaraman first published their findings in the journal of Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences (PNAS) on 26 April 2012.

Killing cancer cells by 'starving' them of energy

Classic experiments in cancer biology have demonstrated that cancer cells feed off the breakdown of the amino acid glutamine to gain energy and grow into a tumour. While it is known that human glutaminase is the first enzyme in catalysing this series of biochemical reactions, little is known about how its activity is controlled, and how it can be manipulated.

The NUS research team has successfully identified the mechanism in which the BPTES that can bind and inhibit glutaminase, can effectively starve the cancer cells of their energy source, and hence, could potentially prevent tumour growth.

In addition, the team has also found that the glutaminase activity can be activated upon the addition of phosphate by epidermal growth factor signaling a pathway that controls cancer cells proliferation. By using another inhibitor to block the kinase Mek2 within this cancer-causing pathway, coupled with the use of BPTES, the combined therapeutic effect is more potent and less toxic. This raises the hope of offering a new dual-drug cancer treatment regime for cancers such as lymphoma, prostate, glioblastoma, breast and kidney cancer cells that is more effective and with fewer side-effects.

The Next Step

Armed with structural insights into the binding and signaling pathway that activates glutaminase, the NUS research team is conducting more studies to determine whether a combination of drugs would be even more effective in inhibiting glutaminase activity and hence, tumour formation.

Using the knowledge that they gained through their current studies, the research team will also look into optimising the tumour suppression property of BPTES to increase its efficiency and lower its side-effects.


'/>"/>
Contact: Carolyn Fong
carolyn@nus.edu.sg
65-651-65399
National University of Singapore
Source:Eurekalert

Related biology news :

1. Scientists identify novel inhibitor of human microRNA
2. Conaway Lab identifies novel mechanism for regulation of gene expression
3. LIAI launches new division to look at novel approaches to heart disease and inflammation
4. Childrens National researchers develop novel anti-tumor vaccine
5. Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory scientists trace a novel way cells are disrupted in cancer
6. Novel publishing approach puts textbook in more hands
7. GEN reports on novel tools for deciphering biological networks
8. UT Southwestern researcher awarded Gates Foundation grant for novel vaccine development
9. 3-substituted indolones as novel therapeutic compounds for neurodegenerative conditions
10. Corn researchers discover novel gene shut-off mechanisms
11. A novel target for therapeutics against Staph infection
Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:
(Date:1/21/2016)... 2016 --> ... research report "Emotion Detection and Recognition Market by Technology (Bio-Sensors, ... Expression, Voice Recognition and Others), Services, Application Areas, ... 2020", published by MarketsandMarkets, the global Emotion Detection ... 22.65 Billion by 2020, at a CAGR of ...
(Date:1/20/2016)... , Jan. 20, 2016  Synaptics Incorporated (NASDAQ: ... interface solutions, today announced sampling of S1423, its ... wearables and small screen applications including smartwatches, fitness ... Supporting round and rectangular shapes, as well as ... performance with moisture on screen, while wearing gloves, ...
(Date:1/13/2016)... 13, 2016 --> ... new market report titled - Biometric Sensors Market - Global ... - 2023. According to the report, the global biometric sensors market was ... to reach US$1,625.8 mn by 2023, expanding at a ... of volume, the biometric sensors market is expected to ...
Breaking Biology News(10 mins):
(Date:2/6/2016)... ... 2016 , ... Contact:, Abby Mitchell, Communications Manager, Phone: 703-448-9062 ... Teacher Training Program , Bite of Science Dinner Event to Strengthen Science Teaching ... Education (CEE) will sponsor a Bite of Science professional enrichment session, cost-free, for ...
(Date:2/5/2016)... 5, 2016  In the pharmaceutical industry the medical ... of launch activities including the identification and engagement of ... is especially high in the oncology therapeutic area where ... and the Role of Medical Affairs in Oncology Launch ... oncology therapies find better ways to utilize medical affairs ...
(Date:2/5/2016)... , February 5, 2016 Amarantus ... biotechnology company focused on developing products for Regenerative Medicine, ... Rare Pediatric Disease Designation (RPDD) from the US Food ... with MANF. MANF was previously granted orphan drug designation ... --> Amarantus BioScience Holdings, Inc. (OTCQB: ...
(Date:2/4/2016)... ... February 04, 2016 , ... ... and compliance training, today announced an interactive FDA compliance training course, ... RAPS (Regulatory Affairs Professional Society) accredited interactive course on Morf Playbook—now conveniently available ...
Breaking Biology Technology: