Navigation Links
Notre Dame study focuses on protein dynamics
Date:1/21/2010

A discovery by associate professor of chemistry and biochemistry Brian Baker and his research group at the University of Notre Dame reveals the importance of dynamic motion by proteins involved in the body's immune response. Results of the study were published in Immunity, the leading research journal in the field of immunology.

Scientists have long known that receptors on the immune system's T-cells are important for discovering and destroying cells that are infected with viruses or other pathogens. Baker's group studied cross-reactivity, the ability of different T-cell receptors which number perhaps a few hundred million in the body to recognize the vastly larger number of possible antigens produced by other cells. The process is important for dealing with viruses, cancers, autoimmunity, transplant rejection and other issues related to the immune system.

Most past studies considered the receptors on each cell as static components, but in fact the molecules move and adopt multiple structures. Baker's group found that the success or failure of the T-cell receptor to attach to a target cell's antigen involves complex movements in search of a compatible final structure. Different antigens produce different kinds of motion.

"What we're adding to the equation is how motion is involved," Baker said. "It both complicates as well as simplifies how we think about recognition. Different extents of motion can exist when you have different antigens being presented. It complicates our thinking about how diversity is presented to the immune system, yet simplifies our thinking about how diversity is accommodated by the immune system.

"Overall, we've got to consider flexibility when we think about structures in the immune system and structures in biology in general."

The static view long-favored in structural biology is shifting to a greater emphasis on protein dynamics, he says. For example, scientists have discovered that vaccines can help the immune system fight cancer, but vaccines that mimic biological structures can still fail if they do not take into account flexibility and dynamics.

"It probably will be one of the defining areas of biochemistry over the next 10 to 15 years getting at the role of how biological molecules move and how that movement influences biology," Baker said.


'/>"/>

Contact: brian baker
briann-baker@nd.edu
574-631-4311
University of Notre Dame
Source:Eurekalert

Related biology news :

1. Notre Dame researchers describe new tool for evaluating managed relocations
2. Childhood obesity indicates greater risk of school absenteeism, Penn study reveals
3. A study by the MUHC and McGill University opens a new door to understanding cancer
4. Study begins to reveal clues to the cause and progression of sepsis
5. Clones on task serve greater good, evolutionary study shows
6. New study warns limited carbon market puts 20 percent of tropical forest at risk
7. New study examines how rearing environment can alter navigation
8. Study links cat disease to flame retardants in furniture and to pet food
9. New continent and species discovered in Atlantic study
10. Study shows link between alcohol consumption and hiv disease progression
11. Feeling hot, hot, hot: New study suggests ways to control fever-induced seizures
Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:
(Date:4/26/2016)... -- Research and Markets has announced the ...  report to their offering.  , ,     (Logo: ... forecast the global multimodal biometrics market to grow ... 2016-2020.  Multimodal biometrics is being implemented ... healthcare, BFSI, transportation, automotive, and government for controlling ...
(Date:4/14/2016)... TEL AVIV, Israel , April 14, 2016 /PRNewswire/ ... in Behavioral Authentication and Malware Detection, today announced the ... has already assumed the new role. Goldwerger,s ... for BioCatch, on the heels of the deployment of ... In addition, BioCatch,s behavioral biometric technology, which discerns unique ...
(Date:3/29/2016)... RATON, Florida , March 29, 2016 ... or the "Company") LegacyXChange "LEGX" and SelectaDNA/CSI Protect are ... DNA in ink used in a variety of writing ... theft. Buyers of originally created collectibles from athletes on ... through forensic analysis of the DNA. ...
Breaking Biology News(10 mins):
(Date:4/27/2016)... ... 27, 2016 , ... The Pittcon Organizing Committee is pleased to announce that ... volunteer member of Committee since 1987. Since then, he has served in a number ... was chairman for both the program and exposition committees. In his professional career, Dr. ...
(Date:4/27/2016)... ... April 27, 2016 , ... ... to announce the appointment of John Tilton as Chief Commercial Officer.  Mr. Tilton ... one of the founding commercial leaders responsible for the commercialization of multiple orphan ...
(Date:4/27/2016)... , ... April 27, 2016 , ... Global Stem ... GSCG Advisory Board. Ross is the founder of GSCG affiliate Kimera Labs in Miami. ... where he studied hematopoietic stem cell transplantation for hematologic disorders and the suppression of ...
(Date:4/26/2016)... ... April 27, 2016 , ... ... Rothgerber Christie LLP as an associate in the firm’s Intellectual Property practice group. ... mechanical and electromechanical patent applications. He has an electrical engineering and computer engineering ...
Breaking Biology Technology: