Navigation Links
Not just another brick in the (plant cell) wall
Date:6/17/2011

In a new study revealing key steps for controlling plant growth, Australian researchers have shown how the assembly of components of the plant cell wall regulates growth of root hairs. Root hairs are important structures that allow plants to absorb essential nutrients and water from the soil. The research will assist in contributing to the sustainability of Australia's plant -based industries such as, agriculture, horticulture and forestry.

Co-author Professor Tony Bacic from the ARC Centre of Excellence in Plant Cell Walls, School of Botany and the Bio21 Institute, at the University of Melbourne, said plant cell walls (plant biomass) represent the world's largest renewable resource.

"Plant sciences have become a major new driver of international research due to their central role as renewable sources of transport fuels, as functional foods to improve human health, and as a source of raw materials for industrial processes," he said.

The study has been published in the current issue of the international journal Science.

Most plant roots are covered in fine root hairs which seek out nutrients in the soil and increase the roots' surface area, allowing more water and nutrients to be absorbed.

"The root hair is therefore very important and this work could have applications for plants growing in dry and nutrient-deficient soils as they need to optimise their nutrient and water uptake," Professor Bacic said.

The root hair is a single tubular cell which grows out from the plant's root surface and is surrounded by a wall rich in complex carbohydrates and glycoproteins. This wall surrounds the cell to strengthen it, like a building scaffold.

So to study root hair growth, an international multidisciplinary team of researchers from Argentina, Australia, the United States, Denmark and Brazil targeted genes involved in the production of wall glycoproteins in the model laboratory plant Arabidopsis.

The team identified three groups of genes required for the assembly of the cell wall scaffold glycoprotein, called extensin. When the genes were prevented from functioning, the root hairs were stunted. Without these scaffold glycoproteins and their complete sugar decorations they don't form their correct molecular shape to enable root hair growth. What controls the expression of these genes is the next important question to be addressed.

"This study enhances our fundamental understanding of the growth of plants, our major renewable resource, and would not have been possible without our international collaboration through the ARC Centre of Excellence in Plant Cell Walls," said Professor Bacic.


'/>"/>

Contact: Charlotte Crawford
charlotte.crawford@unimelb.edu.au
61-383-447-220
University of Melbourne
Source:Eurekalert  

Related biology news :

1. Another fisheries commission throws the science overboard in tuna decision, WWF says
2. Another reason to drink a nice cup of shade-grown joe
3. Cancer: Another step towards medication
4. Desert woodrats switch one dietary poison for another
5. Desert woodrats switch one dietary poison for another
6. The first DFG research centers to be funded for another four years
7. Another JDRF partner moves research forward with collaboration agreement for diabetes treatment
8. Ability to literally imagine oneself in anothers shoes may be tied to empathy
9. Why one way of learning is better than another
10. An answer to another of lifes big questions
11. Genetically-modified mice reveal another mechanism contributing to heart failure
Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:
Related Image:
Not just another brick in the (plant cell) wall
(Date:12/15/2016)... 15, 2016  There is much more to innovative ... the engine. Continental will demonstrate the intelligence of today,s ... . Through the combination of the keyless entry ... biometric elements, the international technology company is opening up ... authentication. "The integration of biometric elements brings ...
(Date:12/12/2016)... Dec. 12, 2016  Researchers at Trinity College, ... graphene by combining the material with Silly Putty. The ... pressure detector able to sense pulse, blood pressure, ... spider.  The research team,s findings ... read here:  http://science.sciencemag.org/content/354/6317/1257 ...
(Date:12/8/2016)...  Singulex, Inc., the leader in Next Generation Immunodiagnostics ... license and supply agreement with Thermo Fisher Scientific, the ... access to Thermo Scientific BRAHMS PCT (Procalcitonin), a biomarker ... to diagnose systemic bacterial infection and sepsis and in ... in assessing the risk of critically ill patients for ...
Breaking Biology News(10 mins):
(Date:1/19/2017)... ... January 19, 2017 , ... FireflySci Inc. is a go-getter type of company ... is accounted to two main factors. The first is the amazing customer service ... supplying FireflySci products all around the world. , 2016 was a tremendous sales year ...
(Date:1/19/2017)... 18, 2017  Northwest Biotherapeutics, Inc. (OTCQB: NWBO) ("NW ... therapies for operable and inoperable solid tumor cancers, announced ... Officer of NW Bio, will present at the Phacilitate ... the Hyatt Regency Hotel in Miami, Florida ... session entitled "New Therapeutic Approaches – Expanding the Reach ...
(Date:1/18/2017)... ... January 18, 2017 , ... Opal Kelly, a leading ... PCI Express, announced the ZEM5310 USB 3.0 FPGA Module, combining a SuperSpeed USB ... sized form factor suitable for prototyping, testing, and production-ready integration. The ZEM5310 USB ...
(Date:1/18/2017)... LINCOLN, Mass. , Jan. 18, 2017 /PRNewswire/ ... in applying mechanistic modeling to drug research and ... , PhD, Co-Founder, President, and CEO of Applied ... Group for Informatics and Modeling (BAGIM) Meeting on ... in Cambridge , MA.   Dr. ...
Breaking Biology Technology: