Navigation Links
Not all women in breast cancer families share high risk
Date:11/1/2011

Mothers, sisters and daughters from breast cancer families with known genetic mutations do not all share the same high risk of developing the disease, according to a new international study involving the University of Melbourne.

Women with the breast cancer genetic mutations BRCA1 or BRCA2 are at least 10 times more likely to develop breast cancer than the average woman.

The new study found that women who do not have a genetic mutation, but are closely related to women who do have genetic mutations are at an average risk of developing the disease.

Professor John Hopper from the School of Population Health, University of Melbourne, who led the Australian component of the study, said some women in this scenario were worrying unnecessarily.

"Our study revealed that these women have an average risk of developing the disease as opposed to the high risk of their mutation-carrying close relatives and hence do not need to worry unnecessarily and over screen to detect the disease," he said.

"These findings go against a 2007 clinic-based study in the UK which claimed that all women in breast cancer families with known genetic mutations are at increased risk of developing the disease even if they don't carry the family-specific mutation," he said.

"Our results revealed there was no evidence of increased breast cancer risk for non-carriers of the genetic mutations, certainly not the five-fold increased risk suggested by the authors of the 2007 study."

The international study is the largest analysis to date of breast cancer risk for non-carriers of family specific breast cancer mutations. It was led by Professor Alice Whittemore from Stanford University School of Medicine, USA and was published today in the Journal of Clinical Oncology.

More than 3000 breast cancer families from the population at large were analysed for their genetic risk of the disease. Researchers compared the risk of breast cancer among first-degree relatives of breast cancer patients who did and did not carry a BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutation.

Women were recruited from an international consortium, the Breast Cancer Family Registry, which used population cancer registries in USA, Australia and Canada. The Australian component involved the Australian Breast Cancer Family Registry, led by Professor John Hopper.

Professor Hopper said genetic testing could help to clarify which women are at high or average risk.

"Genetic testing will give women a clearer indication of their real risk level and hence clarify what they could or should not do to reduce their risks of developing beast cancer," he said.

Women who think they might be at increased risk for breast cancer due to a strong family history of the disease can attend Family Cancer Clinics around Australia for genetic testing.


'/>"/>

Contact: Rebecca Scott
rebeccas@unimelb.edu.au
61-383-440-181
University of Melbourne
Source:Eurekalert

Related biology news :

1. Improved living environments can reduce health problems for women and children
2. Womens heart disease tied to small blood vessels
3. 11 women scientists announced as winners of Elsevier Foundation OWSD awards
4. Innovating to improve women and childrens health
5. Increased celiac disease prevalence in women with unexplained infertility
6. SUNY Downstate researchers identify possible new targets for treating pain in women
7. Pregnant women in Vancouver may not be getting enough vitamin D
8. B-cell discovery suggests why women suffer more autoimmune disease
9. U of M researchers may have discovered key to help women fight infections during pregnancy
10. Greater seizure frequency seen in women with epilepsy during anovulatory cycle
11. PSA test for men could get a second life for breast cancer in women
Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:
(Date:12/19/2016)... 19 de diciembre de 2016  Mosaic Biomedicals SL anunció hoy ... de MSC-1, un anticuerpo humanizado que se espera comenzar a utilizar ... múltiples sitios previstos a lo largo de Europa y Norteamérica. ... MSC-1 es el primer ... leucemia (LIF), una citoquina pleiotrópica que se sobreexpresa en ciertos tumores ...
(Date:12/16/2016)... NEW YORK , Dec. 16, 2016 The global ... reach USD 12.14 billion by 2021 from USD 5.31 billion in ... ... market is mainly driven by technological advancements in medical devices, launch ... devices, rising preference for wireless connectivity among healthcare providers, and increasing ...
(Date:12/15/2016)... 2016 ... Research and Markets has announced the addition of the ... The report forecasts the global military biometrics market to grow at ... report has been prepared based on an in-depth market analysis with inputs ... prospects over the coming years. The report also includes a discussion of ...
Breaking Biology News(10 mins):
(Date:1/23/2017)... LAUDERDALE, Fl (PRWEB) , ... January 23, 2017 ... ... Accredited venture-backed teleradiology and telemedicine company announces significant growth last year adding 65 ... include Veterans Authority and US Army medical centers as well as one of ...
(Date:1/23/2017)... ... January 23, 2017 , ... ... Vice President, Preclinical Safety and Senior Director, Safety Pharmacology. Dr. Thomas earned ... , Dr. Thomas’ career as an academic and industry preclinical drug developer ...
(Date:1/21/2017)... ... ... Nipro Corporation (Osaka, Japan) and Transonic Systems Inc. (New York, USA) announced ... and sales rights for all non-OEM Transonic products in Japan. As partners for more ... Nipro - Transonic JV is a natural next step to advance best practices and ...
(Date:1/21/2017)... CAMBRIDGE, Mass. , Jan. 21, 2017   ... of novel compounds designed to target cancer stemness pathways, ... lead investigational compound, napabucasin, at the 2017 American Society ... San Francisco . In ... administered investigational agent designed to inhibit cancer stemness pathways ...
Breaking Biology Technology: