Navigation Links
Nobel winners for discoveries on cellular vesicle transport speak out at ASCB in New Orleans

NEW ORLEANS, LADECEMBER 12, 2013They are coming to New Orleans to talk science with their fellow members of the American Society for Cell Biology (ASCB) on Monday, December 16, but the ASCB winners of the 2013 Nobel Prize in Medicine, Randy Schekman, PhD, and James Rothman, PhD, are speaking out on controversial issues they believe threaten American science and American society.

On Saturday in Stockholm, Rothman of Yale University closed his Nobel lecture with a warning that "brutal cuts" in federal research funding are destroying American competitiveness in science. On Tuesday in an opinion column published in the British newspaper, The Guardian, Schekman of the University of California, Berkeley, said that the world's three leading scientific journalsCell, Nature, and Scienceare warping science for their own commercial purposes. Calling them "luxury" journals, Schekman wrote, "These journals aggressively curate their brands, in ways more conducive to selling subscriptions than to stimulating the most important research."

Longtime ASCB members, Schekman and Rothman won the 2013 Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine for their discoveries of how molecules move through the cell in vesicles and fuse to target membranes in a process known as "trafficking." Schekman who was ASCB President in 1999 and Rothman who has been an ASCB member since 1982 will share their joint prize of roughly $1.2 million US with Thomas Sdhof of Stanford University for their work on the machinery regulating vesicles in the cell as they move along cytoskeletal roadways, delivering cargoes to different parts of the cell. This basic work was a huge boost for researchers studying conditions such as diabetes and neurodegeneration.

Both men are concerned that the work for which they won their Nobels would be much more difficult in the future because of an climate of budget cutbacks and branded scientific publications. Schekman has been particularly critical of "journal impact factors" or JIFs, a statistical measure of how often a journal is cited in other papers, as "a deeply flawed measure" that is damaging scientific integrity. JIFs have become the widely accepted measure for scientific hiring, advancement, and funding, Schekman wrote, despite their well-known flaws.

The JIF became a major issue at last year's ASCB Annual Meeting when a group of scientists and journal editors drew up the San Francisco Declaration on Research Assessment (DORA), calling for scientists to turn their backs on JIFs and find new measures of individual research value. This week, just six months after the DORA petition was first posted publicly, the number of scientists and scholars including many from the social sciences and the humanities who have signed DORA passed the 10,000 signature mark. An additional 423 scientific and scholarly organizations have also signed. Schekman, a former president of the ASCB and an early DORA supporter, is expected to expand on the DORA premise in his address to the cell biologists on Monday night.

"When we first talked about the ideas that became DORA last year in San Francisco, none of us thought that it would explode like this," said Stefano Bertuzzi, the Executive Director of the ASCB. "As cell biologists, we thought it was our issue but now the 10,000 plus signatures for DORA so far prove that JIFs are seen as serious threat in many fields of science and scholarship. This is not just egghead, ivory tower stuff. What comes out of our labs and our universities is the power that drives our future economy. Research will make or break our future health. DORA is not about footnotes. It's about keeping research honest and vital."

Bertuzzi continued, "The ASCB is delighted to have two of our ownRandy and Jimcoming from Stockholm to New Orleans to use their new fame to stand up for critical issues like budget cuts and DORA."

In his Nobel lecture last Saturday, Rothman of Yale University pointed out that the science of biochemistry which undergirded his Nobel-winning research on how cells package and deliver vital secretions such as insulin was developed around the turn of the last century in Germany. The Nazis destroyed that scientific culture in a matter of years, driving many of the best biochemists to the U.S. where it took root and blossomed, Rothman said. It gave the US an unquestioned scientific leadership form World War II to recent. "Now that culture stands deeply threatened by brutal cuts in support for basic research," Rothman said. "And it can go away."

Both Schekman and Rothman are longtime members of the ASCB, the world's largest society of cell science researchers whose basic discoveries have driven advances in modern medicine and pharmacology. They will address many of the 6,000 attendees at the ASCB Annual Meeting at a special Nobel session in the Great Hall of the New Orleans Morial Convention Center at 6:00 pm CST, on Monday night.


Contact: John Fleischman
American Society for Cell Biology

Related biology news :

1. Nobel Laureate Jules Hoffmann kicks off Annual Drosophila Research Conference
2. Inventions that improve lives are winners at the 2013 Newark Innovation Acceleration Challenge
3. AIBS announces winners of Faces of Biology photo competition
4. Winners named in 2013 AAAS Kavli Science Journalism Awards competition
5. AVS Announces Its Major Award Winners of 2013
6. DOE rooftop challenge winners offer energy, cost savings
7. Entomological Society of America names winners of Monsanto student travel and research awards
8. Entomological Society of America names winners of 2013 student travel grants
9. Entomological Foundation announces 2013 Insect Science Award winners
10. 2013 Balzan prizewinners announced today in press conference in Milan
11. FASEB announces BioArt image and video competition winners
Post Your Comments:
(Date:6/22/2016)... , June 22, 2016   ... management and verification solutions, has partnered with ... software solutions for Visitor Management, Self-Service Kiosks ... provides products that add functional enhancements to ... provides corporations and venues with an automated ...
(Date:6/21/2016)... , June 21, 2016 NuData ... the new role of principal product architect and ... the director of customer development. Both will report ... technical officer. The moves reflect NuData,s strategic growth ... response to high customer demand and customer focus ...
(Date:6/16/2016)... , June 16, 2016 ... is expected to reach USD 1.83 billion by ... View Research, Inc. Technological proliferation and increasing demand ... are expected to drive the market growth. ... The development of advanced multimodal techniques ...
Breaking Biology News(10 mins):
(Date:6/23/2016)... ... June 23, 2016 , ... Charm Sciences, Inc. is ... has received AOAC Research Institute approval 061601. , “This is another AOAC-RI approval ... Bob Salter, Vice President of Regulatory and Industrial Affairs. “The Peel Plate methods ...
(Date:6/23/2016)... 2016  The Biodesign Challenge (BDC), a university competition ... harness living systems and biotechnology, announced its winning teams ... New York City . The ... projects at MoMA,s Celeste Bartos Theater during the daylong ... senior curator of architecture and design, and Suzanne ...
(Date:6/23/2016)... ... June 23, 2016 , ... ... the launch of the Supplyframe Design Lab . Located in Pasadena, Calif., ... the future of how hardware projects are designed, built and brought to market. ...
(Date:6/23/2016)... ... June 23, 2016 , ... In a new case ... Denmark detail how a patient who developed lymphedema after being treated for breast cancer ... could change the paradigm for dealing with this debilitating, frequent side effect of cancer ...
Breaking Biology Technology: