Navigation Links
Nicotine does not promote lung cancer growth in mouse models
Date:4/4/2011

ORLANDO, Fla. Nicotine at doses similar to those found in most nicotine replacements therapies did not increase lung cancer tumor incidence, frequency or size, according to results of a mouse study presented at the AACR 102nd Annual Meeting 2011, held here April 2-6.

"If you take our data and combine it with epidemiological data from Europe, even in people who quit smoking and maintain the use of nicotine replacement therapy for months or years, there does not appear to be increased lung cancer incidence," said Phillip A. Dennis, M.D., Ph.D., senior investigator at the medical oncology branch of the National Cancer Institute. "This suggests that nicotine replacement therapy is probably safe and is certainly safer than smoking."

According to Dennis, about 20 percent of all smokers are truly addicted to tobacco. In these people, the use of nicotine replacement therapy has markedly helped them to quit smoking. The current Food and Drug Administration indication for most nicotine replacement therapies, such as a nicotine patch, is limited to 10 to12 weeks.

There is a subset of smokers who will need to stay on nicotine replacement therapy longer in order to appease addiction, according to Dennis. However, expanding the use of this therapy is controversial. Research to date has linked nicotine to cancer in various ways, including laboratory studies that indicate nicotine promotes the growth or spread of tumor cells or that it helps transform normal lung airway cells into cancerous cells, according to Dennis.

Therefore, the researchers conducted a study in mice to determine if nicotine had any tumor-promoting effects. Three groups of mice were administered nicotine in drinking water for up to 12 weeks.

In the first group, the mice were administered three weekly injections of NNK, a known tobacco carcinogen, prior to receiving nicotine. The second group of mice was genetically engineered to have activation of the KRAS oncogene, which is frequently mutated in lung cancers derived from smokers. The third group was made up of mice that were given cell lines derived from mouse lung cancers.

The researchers found that all the mice had normal water consumption. Cotinine, a metabolite of nicotine, was found to be at a level that is comparable to levels found in nicotine replacement users.

"We observed that there was no effect of nicotine on the mice in all three groups," said Dennis. "Nicotine did not increase tumor incidence, multiplicity or size."

At the levels measured in mice, nicotine did not activate signaling pathways associated with lung cancer that had been shown to be activated by high concentrations of nicotine.

"Based on our study and human epidemiological studies to date, nicotine replacement therapy is probably a safe option," he suggested.


'/>"/>

Contact: Jeremy Moore
Jeremy.Moore@aacr.org
267-646-0557
American Association for Cancer Research
Source:Eurekalert

Related biology news :

1. Study links nicotine with breast cancer growth and spread
2. Researchers find link between nicotine addiction and autism
3. Nicotine activates more than just the brains pleasure pathways
4. Skin color clue to nicotine dependence
5. Simple drug treatment may prevent nicotine-induced SIDS: Study
6. Increased nicotine levels detected in those who light-up earlier
7. Are bees also addicted to caffeine and nicotine?
8. Tobacco companys new, dissolvable nicotine products could lead to accidental poisoning
9. GUMC to develop smoking cessation aids based on unconventional nicotine addiction theory
10. Tobacco and its evil cousin, nicotine? Theyre good -- as a pesticide!
11. Team awarded $7.5 million to identify potential drug candidates to treat nicotine addiction
Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:
(Date:2/21/2017)... PORTLAND, Ore. , Feb. 22, 2017 ... Family of Companies (Avamere Health Services, Infinity Rehab, Signature ... research study that will apply the power of IBM ... living and health centers. By analyzing data streaming from ... insights into physical and environmental conditions, and obtain deeper ...
(Date:2/16/2017)... Feb. 16, 2017  Genos, a community for ... it has received Laboratory Accreditation from the College ... presented to laboratories that meet stringent requirements around ... rigorous processes. "Genos is committed to ... practices. We,re honored to be receiving CAP accreditation," ...
(Date:2/13/2017)... Feb. 13, 2017  RSA Conference -- RSA, a ... is designed to enhance fraud detection and investigation ... the RSA Fraud & Risk Intelligence Suite. The ... leverage additional insights from internal and external sources ... protect their customers from targeted cybercrime attacks. ...
Breaking Biology News(10 mins):
(Date:3/29/2017)... DIEGO , March 29, 2017  Halozyme ... novel oncology and drug-delivery therapies, today announced that ... Food and Drug Administration voted 11 to 0 ... the skin) injection was favorable for patients in ... B-cell lymphoma and chronic lymphocytic leukemia. The FDA ...
(Date:3/29/2017)... ... 2017 , ... Cancer diagnostics and pathology workflow solution provider ... Association of Community Cancer Centers (ACCC) 43rd Annual Meeting, CANCERSCAPE at ... stakeholders from leading national organizations to share insights on how value-based care, drug ...
(Date:3/29/2017)... SAN DIEGO and NEWARK, Del. ... Inc. , a privately-held regenerative medicine company, and ... global materials science company, today announced a collaborative research ... develop novel implantable cell therapy delivery device technologies that ... more than a decade, ViaCyte has been developing innovative ...
(Date:3/29/2017)... DUBLIN , Mar. 29, 2017 ... "Agricultural Biotechnology: Emerging Technologies and Global Markets" report to ... ... (i.e., next generation DNA sequencing, biochips, RNA interference, synthetic biology ... biotech seeds; and biologicals. These technologies and products ...
Breaking Biology Technology: