Navigation Links
Newly discovered gene plays vital role in cancer
Date:2/27/2009

[PRESS RELEASE, 27 February 2009] Gene p53 protects against cancer and is usually described as the most important gene in cancer research. However, scientists at the Swedish medical university Karolinska Institutet have now shown that a previously unknown gene, Wrap53, controls the activity of p53. As the regulation mechanism is relatively unexplored, the study opens up new routes to solving the mystery of cancer.

The p53 gene makes sure that cells with damaged DNA either repair themselves or commit suicide. If p53 itself is damaged, which is the case in roughly half of all cancer tumours, cells that are on their way to becoming cancerous are allowed to survive. Much cancer research revolves around the cell processes that p53 induces.

A group of researchers at Karolinska Institutet have now identified a new gene, called Wrap53, that regulates the activity of p53. The study, which is published in the journal Molecular Cell, demonstrates that Wrap53 gives rise to a molecule, called antisense RNA, the presence of which is necessary for the production of sufficient quantities of p53 protein in the event of DNA damage.

According to Marianne Farnebo, one of the scientists involved in the study, the results indicate that damage to Wrap53 can indirectly cause cancer. Wrap53 is therefore a new potential target for future cancer therapies.

"Mutations in the p53 gene contribute to about half of all cancer cases," she says. "In the remaining half, p53 is probably inactivated in other ways, such as damage to Wrap53 knocking out the production of the p53 protein."

The study is also one of the first to show how antisense RNA regulates genes in the human body. It is already a well-known fact that genes often control each other through the influence of their end products usually proteins on gene expression. With antisense regulation, control is effected instead through the production of mutually stabilising or destructive RNA molecules by genes with overlapping sequences, which determines whether or not the RNA molecules form proteins.

"At least 20 per cent of all genes can be regulated by antisense RNA, making it a potentially very common control mechanism," says Dr Farnebo. "But it's been difficult to show that antisense RNA really does serve important functions in the body, as we've managed to do in this study."


'/>"/>

Contact: Katarina Sternudd
katarina.sternudd@ki.se
46-852-483-895
Karolinska Institutet
Source:Eurekalert

Related biology news :

1. Newly created cancer stem cells could aid breast cancer research
2. Newly-identified exercise gene could help with depression
3. Newly defined signaling pathway could mean better biofuel sources
4. Newly identified role for power plants in human cells could lead to targeted therapies
5. Death, division or cancer? Newly discovered checkpoint process holds the line in cell division
6. Newly described dragon protein could be key to bird flu cure
7. Leatherback turtles newly discovered migration route may be roadmap to salvation
8. Newly discovered monkey is threatened with extinction
9. Newly discovered molecular switch helps decide cell type in early embryo development
10. Genes newly explained effect on height may change tumor disorder treatment
11. Newly-discovered mechanism can explain the Beckwith-Wiedemann syndrome
Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:
(Date:4/11/2017)... 2017 NXT-ID, Inc. (NASDAQ:   NXTD ... the appointment of independent Directors Mr. Robin D. Richards ... of Directors, furthering the company,s corporate governance and expertise. ... Gino Pereira , Chief ... to their guidance and benefiting from their considerable expertise as ...
(Date:4/4/2017)... --  EyeLock LLC , a leader of iris-based identity ... and Trademark Office (USPTO) has issued U.S. Patent No. ... iris image with a face image acquired in sequence ... th issued patent. "The issuance ... multi-modal biometric capabilities that have recently come to market ...
(Date:3/29/2017)... , March 29, 2017  higi, the health IT ... North America , today announced a ... the acquisition of EveryMove. The new investment and acquisition ... of tools to transform population health activities through the ... data. higi collects and secures data today ...
Breaking Biology News(10 mins):
(Date:9/21/2017)... ... September 21, 2017 , ... When a downtown ... response was swift and efficient thanks to the continuing efforts of members of ... of more than 50 stakeholders, including officials from area counties and cities, Renewable ...
(Date:9/20/2017)... , ... September 20, 2017 , ... ... that it has appointed Vishwas Paralkar to the role of chief scientific officer. ... technology. He will report to Cybrexa’s president and CEO, Per Hellsund. , “I ...
(Date:9/20/2017)... ... September 20, 2017 , ... ... examining the effects of exoskeleton-assisted walking on gait parameters and neuromuscular activity ... "Neuromechanical adaptations during a robotic powered exoskeleton assisted walking session" (doi:10.1080.10790268.2017.1314900) was ...
(Date:9/19/2017)... ... September 19, 2017 , ... The latest ... dangerous step of sample prep for metals digestion—the addition of acids and reagents. ... affordable price. The system is ideal for any laboratory performing their own unique ...
Breaking Biology Technology: