Navigation Links
New thoracic imaging approach can pinpoint underlying venous problems

CINCINNATI University of Cincinnati (UC) radiologists have developed a new technique for capturing images of chest veins that eases diagnosis of venous diseases.

Multi-detector computed tomography (CT) scanners are traditionally used to create three-dimensional images of arteries, the vessels which carry oxygen-rich blood away from the heart and distribute blood throughout the body. Veins, smaller vessels that return blood to the heart, are more difficult to accurately image.

Developed by Cristopher Meyer, MD and Achala Vagal, MD, the new protocol allows radiologists to compensate for the extra time it takes contrast solution to reach the veins so useful images can be produced using the CT scanner.

We found that the rapid-imaging scanners were almost too fast for venous studies, explains Vagal, a UC assistant professor and radiologist at University Hospital. By the time the contrast reached the patients veins, there were too many artifacts to make any meaningful conclusions about possible diseasefor example, blood clots.

Venous disease is rare and can be difficult to pinpoint, she adds. This new protocol uses the same imaging equipment in a novel way that allows us to acquire better venous images and make good clinical decisions.

Vagal presented guidelines for this thoracic imaging protocol at the North American Society of Cardiovascular Imagings 35th Annual Meeting and Scientific Sessions in Washington, D.C., on Oct. 8.

For this new imaging technique, the CT technologist prepares two syringes of contrast: The first includes 140 cubic centimeters (CC) of undiluted contrast; the second contains a diluted mixture of 100 CC of contrast and 10 CC of saline solution.

The key to getting accurate clinical images of the veins is in the timing, Vagal says.

Both syringes are given consecutively at a rate of four CC per second, with a 60-second delay between the final injection and initiation of the CT scan.

Previously, there was so much dense contrast in the veins that all you could see on the CT scan were streaks that didnt tell you anything about possible venous disease, explains Vagal. Delaying the scan gave us enough time for both the arteries and the veins to be opacified, which resulted in the crisp images that allowed us to make better clinical determinations.

Vagal is affiliated with the Neuroscience Institute at UC and University Hospital, a center of excellence that focuses on the main diseases of the brain and nerves such as stroke, brain tumors, brain trauma, Parkinsons and Alzheimers disease, epilepsy, ALS and multiple sclerosis.

Contact: Amanda Harper
University of Cincinnati

Related biology news :

1. Imaging Lymph Nodes with Nanoparticles
2. New imaging method gives early indication if brain cancer therapy is effective, U-M study shows
3. Special Imaging Study Shows Failing Hearts Are Energy Starved
4. Duke engineers develop new 3-D cardiac imaging probe
5. Confocal imaging promises early detection of skin cancer
6. Newer imaging techniques may lead to over-treatment
7. Researchers use 3-D imaging system to unveil swimming behavior of microscopic plankton
8. Microscopic brain imaging in the palm of your hand
9. New imaging technology shown to detect pancreatic inflammation in type 1 diabetes
10. Purdues gold nanorods brighten future for medical imaging
11. PET imaging reveals the immune system at work
Post Your Comments:
(Date:10/6/2015)... Calif. , Oct. 6, 2015  Maverix ... today announced enhancements to its software portfolio with ... analysis kit for differential expression in eukaryotes. The ... which is a cloud-based genomic analysis solution that ... scientific discovery from next-generation sequencing efforts. ...
(Date:10/2/2015)... , Oct. 02 2015 ... of the "Enforcing the Law Using Biometrics" ... ) has announced the addition of the ... to their offering. --> Research and ... of the "Enforcing the Law Using Biometrics" ...
(Date:9/30/2015)...  With nearly 300,000 Americans living with spinal cord ... to reach 12,500 annually, the role of Independent Living ... Independent Living (SCRS-IL) is increasingly important. SCRS-IL is ... opening doors to independence for individuals with SCIs ... assistive technology services and education. "In serving ...
Breaking Biology News(10 mins):
(Date:10/13/2015)... ... October 13, 2015 , ... InSphero ... of organotypic 3D cell culture models, has launched a 14 Day Hepatotoxicity ... patent-pending 3D InSightâ„¢ Human Liver Microtissues. The service streamlines toxicity testing of ...
(Date:10/13/2015)... Research and Markets( ) has announced ... for Bone Morphogenetic Protein Growth Factor Therapy - 16 ... --> --> Bone morphogenetic proteins ... bone after a fracture. In nature, these proteins have ... of the skeleton. There are twenty different BMPs that ...
(Date:10/13/2015)... October 13, 2015 " Microbiology Culture ... 2015 - 2023 " , the global microbiology ... anticipated to reach US$7.59 bn by 2023, expanding at a CAGR ... --> " Microbiology Culture Market - Global Industry Analysis, ... , the global microbiology culture market was valued at ...
(Date:10/13/2015)... ... October 13, 2015 , ... AxioMx Inc. , a ... received a Phase I Small Business Innovative Research (SBIR) grant (1R43GM112204-01A1). This Phase ... Sciences (NIGMS), will fund the development of a technique to rapidly convert single-chain ...
Breaking Biology Technology: