Navigation Links
New therapy targets for amyloid disease
Date:12/4/2009

A major discovery is challenging accepted thinking about amyloids the fibrous protein deposits associated with diseases such as Alzheimer's and Parkinson's and may open up a potential new area for therapeutics.

It was believed that amyloid fibrils - rope-like structures made up of proteins sometimes known as fibres - are inert, but that there may be toxic phases during their formation which can damage cells and cause disease.

But in a paper published today [04 December 2009] in the Journal of Biological Chemistry, scientists at the University of Leeds have shown that amyloid fibres are in fact toxic - and that the shorter the fibre, the more toxic it becomes.

"This is a major step forward in our understanding of amyloid fibrils which play a role in such a large number of diseases," said Professor Sheena Radford of the Astbury Centre for Structural Molecular Biology and the Faculty of Biological Sciences.

"We've revisited an old suspect with very surprising results. Whilst we've only looked in detail at three of the 30 or so proteins that form amyloid in human disease, our results show that the fibres they produce are indeed toxic to cells especially when they are fragmented into shorter fibres. "

Amyloid deposits can accumulate at many different sites in the body or can remain localised to one particular organ or tissue, causing a range of different diseases. Amyloid deposits can be seen in the brain, in diseases such as Parkinson's and Alzheimer's, whereas in other amyloid diseases deposits can be found elsewhere in the body, in the joints, liver and many other organs. Amyloid deposits are also closely linked to the development of Type II diabetes.

Professor Radford said: "Problems in the self-assembly process that results in the formation of amyloid are a natural consequence of longer life. In fact 85 per cent of all cases of disease caused by amyloid deposits are seen in those over the age of sixty or so."

The study was funded by the Wellcome Trust and the Biotechnology and Biological Sciences Research Council (BBSRC), supporting a team that included both cell biologists and biophysicists.

The next stage of this work is to look at a greater number of proteins that form amyloid fibres in order to consolidate these findings, says co-author and cell biologist Dr Eric Hewitt. "What we've discovered is fundamental and offers a whole new area for those working on therapeutics in this area. We anticipate that when we look at amyloid fibres formed from other proteins, they may well follow the same rules."

The team also hopes to discover why the shorter amyloid fibres are more toxic that their longer counterparts.

"It may be that because they're smaller it's easier for them to infiltrate cells," says Dr Hewitt. "We've observed them killing cells, but we're not sure yet exactly how they do it. Nor do we know whether these short fibres form naturally when amyloid fibres assemble or whether some molecular process makes them disassemble or fragment into shorter fibres.These are our next big challenges."


'/>"/>

Contact: Clare Elsley
clare@campuspr.co.uk
44-113-258-9880
University of Leeds
Source:Eurekalert  

Related biology news :

1. A new radiation therapy treatment developed for head and neck cancer patients
2. St. Jude finds factors that accelerate resistance to targeted therapy in lymphoblastic leukemia
3. UC health news: molecular pathway may predict chemotherapy effectiveness
4. MIT works toward safer gene therapy
5. Intravenous gene therapy protects normal tissue of mice during whole-body radiation
6. Gene, stem cell therapy only needs to be 50 percent effective to create a healthy heart
7. Fourth Annual International Conference on Cell Therapy for Cardiovascular Diseases
8. Safe and effective therapy discovered for patients with protein-losing enteropathy
9. Ireland Cancer Center researchers advance stem cell gene therapy
10. Dolphin therapy a dangerous fad, Emory researchers warn
11. Cancer and arthritis therapy may be promising treatment for diabetes
Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:
Related Image:
New therapy targets for amyloid disease
(Date:1/22/2016)... January 22, 2016 ... addition of the  "Global Behavioral Biometric ... --> http://www.researchandmarkets.com/research/4lmf2s/global_behavioral ) has ... Behavioral Biometric Market 2016-2020"  report to ... and Markets ( http://www.researchandmarkets.com/research/4lmf2s/global_behavioral ) has announced ...
(Date:1/20/2016)... -- A market that just keeps on growing. Molecular ... in genomics knowledge. Learn all about it in this ... dynamic trends are pushing market growth and company valuations. ... - pathogen evolution - next generation sequencing - emergence ... of the role of genetic material in Disease and ...
(Date:1/18/2016)... Calif. , Jan. 18, 2016  Extenua ... software that simplifies the use and access of ... and go-to-market partnership with American Cyber.  ... brings extensive experience leading transformational C4ISR and Cyber ... and integrating the latest proven technology solutions," said ...
Breaking Biology News(10 mins):
(Date:2/10/2016)... ... February 10, 2016 , ... Curoverse announced ... On Azure, Arvados provides capabilities for managing and processing genomic and health data ... from major institutions collecting and analyzing genomic data,” said Adam Berrey chief executive ...
(Date:2/10/2016)... La Jolla CA (PRWEB) , ... February 10, 2016 , ... ... of new agents for the treatment of Alzheimer’s disease, announced today it has been ... to February 18th at the Breakers in Palm Beach, Florida. The purpose of ...
(Date:2/9/2016)... ... February 09, 2016 , ... With a presidential election ... Health Care Business Conference will bring together over 500 top healthcare leaders for a ... in transformation. The conference, organized by MBA students of the University of Pennsylvania’s Wharton ...
(Date:2/9/2016)... ... February 08, 2016 , ... Date ... S. Blumberg Institute at the Pennsylvania Biotechnology Center of Bucks County, 3805 Old ... Commonwealth Medical College (TCMC) will hold an open house for participants to learn ...
Breaking Biology Technology: