Navigation Links
New test could identify smokers at risk of emphysema
Date:4/6/2010

Using CT scans to measure blood flow in the lungs of people who smoke may offer a way to identify which smokers are most at risk of emphysema before the disease damages and eventually destroys areas of the lungs, according to a University of Iowa study.

The study found that smokers who have very subtle signs of emphysema, but still have normal lung function, have very different blood flow patterns in their lungs compared to non-smokers and smokers without signs of emphysema.

This difference could be used to identify smokers at increased risk of emphysema and allow for early intervention. The findings appear this week in the Early Edition of the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.

"We have developed a new tool to detect early emphysema-related changes that occur in smokers who are susceptible to the disease," said lead study author Eric Hoffman, Ph.D., UI professor of radiology, internal medicine and biomedical engineering. "Our discovery may also help researchers understand the underlying causes of this disease and help distinguish this type of emphysema from other forms of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. This type of CT scan could even be a tool to test the effectiveness of new therapies by looking at the changes in lung blood flow."

As many as 24 million Americans have chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) -- a group of serious lung diseases that includes emphysema -- and COPD is the fourth leading cause of death nationwide. Because COPD is a group of different diseases, identifying more effective treatments may hinge on distinguishing between these diseases and targeting them separately.

The team used multi-detector row CT imaging to measure blood flow patterns in the lungs of 41 study participants -- 17 non-smokers and 24 smokers. All the participants had normal lung function, but 12 of the smokers had very subtle signs of emphysema. The CT scans showed that these 12 individuals had the most disrupted patterns of blood flow compared to the other participants.

The findings also support the idea that abnormal blood flow occurs before emphysema develops.

"Although the underlying causes of emphysema are not well understood, smoking increases the risk of developing the disease," Hoffman said. "Our study suggests that some smokers have an abnormal response to inflammation in their lungs; instead of sending more blood to the inflamed areas to help repair the damage, blood flow is turned off and the inflamed areas deteriorate."

The cellular pathway that turns off blood flow is helpful when an area of the lung has become permanently blocked and cannot be rescued. In that case, the lung "optimizes gas exchange" and stops supplying the area with blood. However, lung inflammation caused by smoking can be resolved and resultant damage repaired by increased blood flow, which brings oxygen and helpful cellular components to the site of injury.

This study suggests that the ability to distinguish when to turn off or when to ramp up blood flow is defective in some people -- probably due to genetic differences. If this genetic difference is coupled with smoking, which increases lung inflammation, that could increase the risk of developing emphysema.


'/>"/>

Contact: Jennifer Brown
jennifer-l-brown@uiowa.edu
319-356-7124
University of Iowa - Health Science
Source:Eurekalert  

Related biology news :

1. Plastic electronics could slash the cost of solar panels
2. VARI study could improve treatments for prostate cancer
3. Second plant pathway could improve nutrition, biofuel production
4. U Alberta find could shield humans from influenza virus
5. Business affiliation could increase potential risk of farm-to-farm transmission of avian influenza
6. A-maize-ing discovery could lead to higher corn yields for food, feed and fuel
7. Flexible electronics could help put off-beat hearts back on rhythm
8. Vaccine could delay bowel inflammation and colon cancer, says Pitt research
9. Warmer summers could create challenges for nesting Arctic seabirds
10. Could smell play a role in the origin of new bird species?
11. Fishing discard ban could damage sea bird success, scientists warn
Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:
Related Image:
New test could identify smokers at risk of emphysema
(Date:3/20/2017)... , March 20, 2017 At this year,s ... -based biometrics manufacturer DERMALOG. The Chancellor came to the DERMALOG stand ... is this year,s CeBIT partner country. At the largest German biometrics ... in use: fingerprint, face and iris recognition as well as DERMALOGĀ“s multi-biometrics ... ...
(Date:3/9/2017)... FRANCISCO and MOUNTAIN VIEW, Calif. ... , "Eating Well Made Simple," and 23andMe , ... help guide better food choices.  Zipongo can now provide ... their food preferences, health goals and biometrics, but also ... certain food choices. Zipongo,s personalized food decision ...
(Date:3/2/2017)... , March 2, 2017 Summary ... better understand Merck KGaA and its partnering interests and ... https://www.reportbuyer.com/product/3605601/ Description The Partnering Deals and Alliance ... partnering activity of one of the world,s leading life ... prepared upon purchase to ensure inclusion of the most ...
Breaking Biology News(10 mins):
(Date:3/23/2017)... 2017  BioPharmX Corporation (NYSE MKT: BPMX), a ... market, today reported financial results for the quarter ... provide an update on the company,s clinical development ... "We are pleased to report that last year ... President Anja Krammer. "We achieved key clinical milestones ...
(Date:3/23/2017)... 2017 According to a report by Transparency ... fragmented due to the presence of a large pool of participants; ... Fisher , and Sigma-Aldrich, compete with each other in this market. ... more than 76% of this market in 2016.  ... As of now, a large number ...
(Date:3/22/2017)... , March 22, 2017 Regeneron Pharmaceuticals, Inc. ... Regeneron Genetics Center (RGC), U.K. Biobank and GSK to generate ... U.K. Biobank resource. The initiative will enable researchers to gain ... medicines for a wide range of serious and life threatening ... ...
(Date:3/22/2017)... CAMBRIDGE, Mass. , March 22, 2017 ... announced that it has eclipsed the 130 million covered ... Cross Blue Shield of Texas . ... stages, the Company continues to enjoy strong payor acceptance ... of its clinical programs and genetic counseling, its industry-leading ...
Breaking Biology Technology: