Navigation Links
New technology on the way to aid cancer suffers who lose their hair after chemotherapy
Date:10/29/2014

Cancer suffers who lose their hair as a consequence of chemotherapy will benefit from a major research project that will improve the scalp cooling technology that prevents hair loss.

The research is being now underway and is being pioneered by global scalp cooling manufacturing company, Paxman Coolers, of Fenay Bridge, Huddersfield, in conjunction with the biology department of the University of Huddersfield.

The research will be led by key researcher Omar Hussain, who has a background in the pharmacology of cancer treatment, which he will use towards his PhD.

Omar joined Paxman's originally as a researcher on a joint government-sponsored Knowledge Transfer Partnership between the company and the university designed to establish the scientific basis of scalp cooling and its success rate with different drugs.

He was supervised by the University's Dr Nik Georgopoulos and Dr Andrew Collett and he co-authored an article in the specialist journal Toxicology in Vitro on the findings of the project.

For Paxman's Managing Director, Richard Paxman, the research represents an exciting development that will enable further improvements in the treatment and the technology.

"When a patient comes to us and asks what the chances are of keeping their hair, at the moment we are very fair and say they are 50 per cent. Now we want to take that up to 80 per cent and we believe that greater understanding of the scientific mechanisms will allow us to do that," he said.

Omar Hussain – who has presented his research at several international conferences, in tandem with a Paxman team – described how he replicated the effect of scalp cooling in laboratory conditions.

Cells were taken from hair follicles and subjected to a simulation of chemotherapy treatment. Experiments were conducted with different levels of temperature, from 37 degrees C – the normal temperature of the human body – and then lowered. As the temperatures fell, cell survival increased.

"Compared with 37 degrees there are huge differences," said Omar. "At low temperatures, cells are being rescued and maintained well and this promotes the cooling effect." He added that the optimum temperature for scalp cooling is yet to be finalised, although it is below 22 degrees C.

After extensive testing and research – with Omar closely involved – Paxman Coolers plans to launch a fourth generation scalp cooler in 2016. Richard Paxman said that acceptance of scalp cooling technology was initially slow during the early years of development, but sales have grown by at least 20 per cent annually for the past five years and are expected to accelerate further. Export business is especially strong.


'/>"/>

Contact: Nicola Werritt
n.c.werritt@hud.ac.uk
01-484-473-315
University of Huddersfield
@HuddersfieldUni
Source:Eurekalert  

Related biology news :

1. Media Alert; NXT-ID Chief Technology Officer Comments on Why You Need a Smart Wallet
2. Vivametrica Cofounder to Lead the Stanford Center for Medical Mobile Technology
3. The overlooked history of African technology
4. Biometrics & Technology Resources Lead to Increased Revenue Generation for e-Commerce, e-Payment Services & Digital Wallets
5. New RFID technology helps robots find household objects
6. Calico enters into exclusive collaboration with 2M to develop UTSW technology
7. Biometrics Technology (Face, Hand geometry, Voice, Signature, Iris, AFIS, Non-AFIS and Others) Market - Global Industry Analysis Size Share Growth Trends and Forecast 2013 - 2019
8. Global Biometrics Smart Wallets and Technology Quickly Mature as New Devices are Introduced to Eliminate the Need for Credit Cards While Addressing Cybertheft Concerns
9. Profile Solutions, Inc Signs Exclusive Worldwide License for Patented Technology and Intellectual Property
10. Sponsors And CROs Rapidly Adopting MedNet Solutions eClinical Technology Platform
11. New technology may identify tiny strains in body tissues before injuries occur
Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:
Related Image:
New technology on the way to aid cancer suffers who lose their hair after chemotherapy
(Date:11/27/2018)... (PRWEB) , ... November 27, 2018 , ... Veni Vici, or Anthony, is a competitive ... his right knee. At the time, he was fourteen years old and Lisa was ... be well enough to be a trail horse. Devasted, Lisa sought the expert opinion ...
(Date:11/20/2018)... Calif. (PRWEB) , ... November 19, 2018 , ... ... Emsculpt in the Bay Area -- the first and only non-invasive buttock ... contractions, Emsculpt is FDA cleared to strengthen, tone and firm the buttocks to ...
(Date:11/16/2018)... ... 16, 2018 , ... Bergeson & Campbell, P.C. (B&C®) has ... engage listeners in intelligent, insightful conversation about everything related to industrial, pesticidal, and ... of lawyers, scientists, and consultants will keep listeners abreast of the changing world ...
Breaking Biology News(10 mins):
(Date:11/13/2018)... , ... November 12, 2018 , ... ... state-of-the-art practices in Alpharetta and Sandy Springs, now welcomes new patients for MTM® ... discreet and comfortable alternative to traditional braces in the Sandy Springs and Alpharetta ...
(Date:11/13/2018)... ... November 13, 2018 , ... ... Research Water Life Science® in Grants Pass, Oregon believes in the power of ... Aqua® Research Water Life Science® sponsors the Power of Water® on talk radio ...
(Date:11/9/2018)... ... November 08, 2018 , ... IC System, one of the ... to increasing recovery rates by creating a comprehensive contact strategy for each consumer. ... by NLP Logix, a Jacksonville, Florida-based AI solutions company, and leveraged the decades ...
(Date:11/7/2018)... ... November 07, 2018 , ... Diversified Technologies, Inc. (DTI) ... AzCATI, the Arizona Center for Algae Technology and Innovation at ASU. Funded by a ... trials for those involved with algal and predator control applications. , Algae ponds get ...
Breaking Biology Technology: