Navigation Links
New study shows soy protein lowers non-HDL cholesterol significantly more than milk protein
Date:1/18/2011

Soy protein's ability to lower total and LDL (low-density lipoprotein or "the bad") cholesterol has been extensively studied, but the mechanism whereby soy protein lowers cholesterol remains unresolved. A new study published in the Journal of Clinical Lipidology last month shows that soy protein lowers total cholesterol and non-HDL (non-high-density lipoprotein) cholesterol significantly more than milk protein in patients with moderately high cholesterol levels.

"Non-HDL cholesterol has been shown to be a somewhat stronger predictor of cardiovascular disease and mortality risk than LDL cholesterol in population studies," said Elaine Krul, co-author of the study and nutrition discovery lead at Solae. "The fact that soy protein significantly decreased non-HDL cholesterol levels compared to milk protein in this study is very promising."

This randomized, controlled, parallel arm trial evaluated the effects of an insoluble fraction of soy protein, compared to total milk proteins with high calcium content, on the fasting lipid profile. It also assessed the potential contributions of increased excretion of bile acids and neutral sterols to their lipid-altering effects.

"The results of this study also showed that soy protein lowered non-HDL through a mechanism that does not involve increased bile acid excretion, but some yet to be determined mechanism," said Kevin Maki, lead author of the study. "Nonetheless, these results are supportive of the heart health claim for soy protein."

The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) heart health claim for soy protein established in 1999 states that "25 grams of soy protein a day, as part of a diet low in saturated fat and cholesterol, may reduce the risk of heart disease." Currently, 11 other countries have approved health claims for soy protein's potential to lower blood cholesterol and lower the risk of coronary heart disease.

Solae's soy protein that was used in this study was a relatively insoluble fraction of soy protein isolate that had been shown to lower plasma cholesterol and increase fecal bile acid excretion in animals. The levels of isoflavones in the soy protein were lower than the average commercial soy protein isolate further supporting the notion that isoflavones do not play a role in the cholesterol lowering. The milk protein supplemented group also showed a modest cholesterol lowering.

Subjects for this study included men and women 18 to 79 years of age with elevated cholesterol, defined as fasting LDL-cholesterol concentrations of at least 100 mg/dL and less than 200 mg/dL while receiving no lipid altering therapy. Once recruited, participants were asked to follow a Therapeutic Lifestyle Changes diet throughout the study. Subjects that still met the inclusion criteria were then screened for their ability to lower their cholesterol in response to a bile acid binding drug, colesevelam. A majority of subjects responded and were then randomized to the test protein groups.


'/>"/>

Contact: Jennifer Starkey
jstarkey@solae.com
314-659-3145
Solae, LLC
Source:Eurekalert

Related biology news :

1. Big city life may make residents lean toward green, study says
2. Columbia University uses technological innovation to study bone structure
3. Study finds fisheries management makes coral reefs grow faster
4. UCSF study identifies chemicals in pregnant women
5. Texas A&M study finds courtship affects gene expression in flies
6. Study identifies new genetic signatures of breast cancer drug resistance
7. Study estimates land available for biofuel crops
8. Researchers brave icy waters to study Arctic food web
9. Lake Erie hypoxic zone doesnt affect all fish the same, study finds
10. College students lack scientific literacy, study finds
11. Study finds energy limits global economic growth
Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:
(Date:5/9/2016)... 9, 2016 Elevay is currently ... expanding freedom for high net worth professionals seeking travel ... globally connected world, there is still no substitute for ... duplicate sealing your deal with a firm handshake. This ... taking advantage of citizenship via investment programs like those ...
(Date:4/26/2016)... DUBLIN , April 27, 2016 ... of the  "Global Multi-modal Biometrics Market 2016-2020"  report ... ) , The analysts forecast ... a CAGR of 15.49% during the period 2016-2020.  ... a number of sectors such as the healthcare, ...
(Date:4/13/2016)... 13, 2016  IMPOWER physicians supporting Medicaid patients in ... new clinical standard in telehealth thanks to a new ... higi platform, IMPOWER patients can routinely track key health ... mass index, and, when they opt in, share them ... to a local retail location at no cost. By ...
Breaking Biology News(10 mins):
(Date:5/31/2016)... ... , ... The Academy of Model Aeronautics is thrilled to announce a new ... through Labor Day 2016. Bill Chaffee’s Boeing P-12B will be exhibited thanks to a ... first place for Senior Scale Model at the 1930 National Airplane Model League of ...
(Date:5/27/2016)... , ... May 27, 2016 , ... PBI-Gordon Corporation is ... and Ornamental Products. , In his 15-year career with PBI-Gordon, Dave has served in ... where he was integral in the development and launch of many of PBI-Gordon’s most ...
(Date:5/27/2016)... -- At present, the Biotech sphere is in ... that volatility is what makes this industry interesting to consider. ... Corp. (NASDAQ: SNTA ), CTI BioPharma Corp. (NASDAQ: ... ), and Heat Biologics Inc. (NASDAQ: HTBX ). ... for these stocks at: http://www.activewallst.com/register/ ...
(Date:5/26/2016)... 26, 2016 Q BioMed Inc. (OTCQB: ... be a featured presenter at the 5th Annual Marcum MicroCap ... York City at the Grand Hyatt Hotel. ... BioMed Inc. CEO, is scheduled to begin at 11a.m ET ... business strategy, recent developments and outline milestones for the balance ...
Breaking Biology Technology: