Navigation Links
New study shows promise for preventing preterm births
Date:12/15/2011

LEXINGTON, Ky. -- A new study co-authored by the University of Kentucky's Dr. John O'Brien found that applying vaginal progesterone to women who are at a high risk of preterm birth significantly decreased the odds of a premature delivery.

The new study, published in the American Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology, described a two-prong strategy used by doctors: participating pregnant women underwent a measurement of the cervical length via transvaginal cervical ultrasound to define risk for preterm birth; and those found to have a short cervix were successfully treated with vaginal progesterone. A short cervix defined as a length of 25 millimeters or less is a major risk factor for preterm birth.

Approximately 12.9 million births worldwide are preterm which is defined as less than 37 weeks of gestation. The United States has the highest rate of preterm births in the world. "Early" preterm births -- those less than 32 weeks -- are associated with a high rate of neonatal complications and long-term neurologic disability. "Late" preterm births (between 34 and 36-6/7 weeks) represent 70 percent of all preterm births; and although they have a lower rate of complications than early preterm births, they are still a major health care problem.

The study showed that the vaginal application of progesterone gel significantly reduces the rate of preterm birth in women at less than 33 weeks of gestation, but also is effective at less than 28, 32 and 35 weeks. This means that vaginal progesterone reduces both "early" and "late" preterm births.

Vaginal progesterone administered to women with a short cervix detected via ultrasound also reduced the rate of admissions to the newborn intensive care unit; respiratory distress syndrome; the need for mechanical ventilation; and a composite score of complications that included intracranial hemorrhage, bowel problems, respiratory difficulties, infection and death.

O'Brien, division chief of Maternal-Fetal Medicine at UK, says the progesterone treatment is safe because the natural pregnancy hormone is the made by the placenta and the ovaries during pregnancy.

"For too long, little progress has been made in the prevention of premature births," said O'Brien. "However, this new large study shows that it's possible to both help women determine if they are at risk for preterm birth, and provide a safe and effective treatment to help prevent preterm births."


'/>"/>
Contact: Allison Perry
allison.perry@uky.edu
859-323-2399
University of Kentucky
Source:Eurekalert

Related biology news :

1. Long-term study shows effect of climate change on animal diversity
2. £2 million study to reveal workings of dementia genes
3. New study looks to define evangelicals and how they affect polling
4. CU-Boulder study suggests air quality regulations miss key pollutants
5. Researchers study acoustic communication in deep-sea fish
6. Study reveals homeowner perceptions in fire-prone areas
7. Researchers study how pistachios may improve heart health
8. Study: urban black bears live fast, die young
9. New study indicates link between weight gains during pregnancy and dieting history
10. Study reveals specific gene in adolescent men with delinquent peers
11. Sweat it out: UH study examines ability of sweat patches to monitor bone loss
Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:
(Date:4/4/2017)... , April 4, 2017   EyeLock LLC ... announced that the United States Patent and Trademark Office ... broadly covers the linking of an iris image with ... transaction) and represents the company,s 45 th issued ... patent is very timely given the multi-modal biometric capabilities ...
(Date:3/30/2017)... , March 30, 2017 Trends, opportunities ... (physiological and behavioral), by technology (fingerprint, AFIS, iris recognition, ... recognition, and others), by end use industry (government and ... immigration, financial and banking, and others), and by region ... , Asia Pacific , and ...
(Date:3/24/2017)... March 24, 2017 The Controller General of Immigration ... Abdulla Algeen have received the prestigious international IAIR Award for ... Continue Reading ... ... Deputy Controller Abdulla Algeen (small picture on the right) have received the ...
Breaking Biology News(10 mins):
(Date:6/22/2017)... Longmont, Colorado (PRWEB) , ... June 21, 2017 ... ... the RTP regional office in North Carolina, and engages Timothy Reinhardt to manage ... years of quality leadership at Pfizer Inc, with his most recent role as ...
(Date:6/22/2017)... LOS ANGELES, CA (PRWEB) , ... June 22, ... ... alignment with global health leaders in designating infertility as a disease, bringing new ... voted last week at their 2017 annual meeting to back the World Health ...
(Date:6/22/2017)... ... June 22, 2017 , ... The first human cell line HeLa, established in ... data on cross-contamination of human cell lines with HeLa cells were published. Until recently, ... culture labs and is associated with dramatic consequences for research. , In this ...
(Date:6/20/2017)... Rocky Hill, CT (PRWEB) , ... June 20, ... ... entrepreneurial support, today announced that the CTNext board of directors has formed a ... developed by a working group composed of institution presidents and other high-ranking representatives ...
Breaking Biology Technology: