Navigation Links
New study links excessive amounts of vitamin D to onset of atrial fibrillation
Date:11/16/2011

SALT LAKE CITY While previous studies have linked vitamin D deficiency to an increased risk for cardiovascular disease, new research at the Intermountain Medical Center Heart Institute shows that too much vitamin D can lead to the onset of a dangerous heart condition known as atrial fibrillation.

Researchers at Intermountain Medical Center, the flagship facility for the Intermountain Healthcare system, studied more than 132,000 patients and found the risk of developing atrial fibrillation was two and a half times greater in those with excess levels of vitamin D compared to patients with normal levels.

Results of the study will be presented on Wednesday, Nov. 16, at the American Heart Association Scientific Sessions in Orlando, Fla.

Atrial fibrillation is a condition in which the heart's upper chambers quiver instead of beating rhythmically, which can cause blood to pool and clot. Atrial fibrillation has been linked to an increased risk of stroke, heart failure, heart attack, dementia and even Alzheimer's disease.

T. Jared Bunch, MD, a heart rhythm specialist at the Intermountain Medical Center Heart Institute and lead investigator on the study, says the findings are significant because so many Americans use vitamin supplements to promote their health.

"There are both benefits and harm to taking vitamin supplements of all kinds," says Dr. Bunch. "Our goal is to determine a safe dose and usage range so patients can understand what amount is healthy, and what amount may be toxic."

To determine if there is a correlation between too much vitamin D and increased heart risk, Dr. Bunch and his colleagues examined blood tests from 132,000 patients in the Intermountain Healthcare database at Intermountain Medical Center.

Patients did not have any known history of atrial fibrillation, and all had previously received a vitamin D assessment as part of their routine care. Patients were then placed into categories to compare levels of vitamin D: low (less than 20 nanograms per decilter), low/normal (21-40 ng/dl), normal (41-80 ng/dl), high/normal (81-100 ng/dl), and excess (more than 100).

Patients with vitamin D levels in the normal range were compared with other groups to assess their risk of developing atrial fibrillation. In patients with low, low-normal, normal and high-normal levels of vitamin D there was no increased risk of atrial fibrillation. However, in those with excess levels of vitamin D there was a significant increased risk of atrial fibrillation. Atrial fibrillation risk was two and a half times greater in patients with excess levels of vitamin D compared to those with normal levels.

The Institute of Medicine currently advises that healthy adults should be able to take as much as 4000 IU (international units) of vitamin D daily. But the reality is that doctors don't yet know how much vitamin D causes toxicity, which is why Dr. Bunch says communication between a patient and their healthcare provider is critical.

Vitamin D, which is synthesized by the body with exposure to sun, is used to regulate calcium and phosphate concentrations in the blood and is essential for growth and development, cellular health, and bone remodeling, a process where mature bone tissue is removed from the skeleton and new bone tissue is formed.

In regions where sun exposure may be limited, supplemental vitamin D may be required to maintain normal blood levels. The exact amount of vitamin D to achieve normal levels is unknown and usage varies in different regions and communities, which can cause problems, say the researchers.

Dr. Bunch stresses that patients need to tell their doctors about all of the vitamins and supplements they take, as well as all medications, in order to ensure they get the best care possible. He says this research also suggests that checking blood levels of vitamin D in patients that develop atrial fibrillation may help uncover the cause of the abnormal heart rhythm disorder.

"Patients don't think of vitamins and supplements as drugs," says Dr. Bunch. "But any vitamin or supplement that is touted as 'healing' or 'natural' is a drug and will have effects that are both beneficial and harmful. Just like any therapy, vitamins need to be taken for the right reasons and at the right doses."

More than two millions Americans suffer from atrial fibrillation. The risk of developing atrial fibrillation increases as people age. About five percent of people over the age of 80 will develop the heart disorder during their lifetime.


'/>"/>

Contact: Jennifer Barrett
jennifer.barett@imail.org
801-408-2182
Intermountain Medical Center
Source:Eurekalert

Related biology news :

1. Study IDs new genetic links to impulsivity, alcohol problems in men
2. Forests cooler or warmer than open areas depending on latitude, study finds
3. Harm not those strangers that pollinate, study warns
4. MSU researcher sent to Siberia to study global change
5. Trees adapt to poor levels of sunlight to effectively process carbon, study shows
6. New study finds that even the cleanest wastewater contributes to more super bacteria
7. New technique enables study of challenging proteins
8. Rising air pollution worsens drought, flooding, UMD-led study shows
9. Study evaluates risk factors for chronic TMJD
10. Groundbreaking study quantifies health costs of climate-change related disasters in the US
11. Wood biofuel could be a competitive industry by 2020: UBC study
Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:
(Date:4/11/2017)... 11, 2017 No two people are ... the New York University Tandon School of Engineering ... found that partial similarities between prints are common ... mobile phones and other electronic devices can be ... vulnerability lies in the fact that fingerprint-based authentication ...
(Date:4/5/2017)... Today HYPR Corp. , leading innovator ... of the HYPR platform is officially FIDO® Certified ... architecture that empowers biometric authentication across Fortune 500 enterprises ... over 15 million users across the financial services industry, ... product suites and physical access represent a growing portion ...
(Date:3/30/2017)... March 30, 2017  On April 6-7, 2017, Sequencing.com ... Genome hackathon at Microsoft,s headquarters in ... will focus on developing health and wellness apps that ... Hack the Genome is the first hackathon for ... world,s largest companies in the genomics, tech and health ...
Breaking Biology News(10 mins):
(Date:10/11/2017)... ... October 11, 2017 , ... Proscia ... be hosting a Webinar titled, “Pathology is going digital. Is your lab ready?” ... pathology adoption best practices and how Proscia improves lab economics and realizes an ...
(Date:10/11/2017)... Georgia (PRWEB) , ... October 11, 2017 , ... Disappearing ... taking the lives of over 5.5 million people each year. Especially those living in ... greenovative startup Treepex - based in one of the most pollution-affected countries globally - ...
(Date:10/10/2017)... DIEGO, CALIF. (PRWEB) , ... October 10, 2017 , ... ... as part of its corporate rebranding initiative announced today. The bold new look ... its reach, as the company moves into a significant growth period. , It will ...
(Date:10/10/2017)... ... ... Dr. Bob Harman, founder and CEO of VetStem Biopharma, Inc. spent ... entitled “Stem Cells and Their Regenerative Powers,” was held on August 31st, 2017 ... joined by two human doctors: Peter B. Hanson, M.D., Chief of Orthopedic Surgery, Grossmont ...
Breaking Biology Technology: