Navigation Links
New scanning strategy could help develop heart disease treatments
Date:12/12/2011

Patients with life-threatening heart valve disease could be helped with alternative scanning techniques that provide greater insight into the condition.

Researchers from the University of Edinburgh used an imaging technique that could help predict which patients will need open heart surgery to replace their heart valves, and improve treatments to prevent the disease.

The narrowing and hardening of the heart's aortic valve a common condition known as aortic stenosis affects 1 in 20 people over 65 in the UK and is on the increase due to an ageing population. The study, funded by the British Heart Foundation (BHF), trialled the use of positron emission tomography (PET) scans among patients with the condition.

The scans give a much clearer insight into the process that causes aortic stenosis than ultrasound scans, which are currently used for diagnosis. They involve using tracer chemicals, which highlight molecular changes within the body.

Dr Marc Dweck, of the University of Edinburgh's Clinical Research Imaging Centre, said: "Currently the only form of treatment is heart surgery which is not necessarily ideal as the majority of patients are over 65. These scans will help us better understand what is happening to the heart valves, and hopefully help us to halt the processes causing the narrowing. It may also allow us to predict which patients are likely to need an operation and when this might occur."

The scans showed that inflammation, possibly related to fatty deposits, was important in establishing the very early stages of the disease. However, after this initial trigger subsequent narrowing was instead mainly due to the build-up of calcium deposits in the valve.

The use of the PET scans mean that scientists can now analyse what is happening to heart valves earlier in the disease process, when treatments are more likely to be effective. The study has been published in the journal Circulation.

Dr Shannon Amoils, Research Advisor at the BHF, said: "Aortic stenosis is the most common reason for having a heart valve operation in the UK. It would be much better for patients if we could either prevent the condition or treat it with a drug at an early stage. But the fact is that there are currently no medicines for the condition, and no accurate way of predicting how quickly it will progress.

"We're delighted to have been able to fund this study, which has used state-of-the-art imaging technology to reveal clues about the biology underlying aortic stenosis and how it progresses. The researchers have shown that calcification, or 'hardening', of the aortic valve may be the most important process underlying its progressive narrowing. This could explain why attempts to treat patients by targeting the inflammation in the valve have not worked, and it offers hope that a change of strategy targeting the calcification process might prove more successful."


'/>"/>

Contact: Tara Womersley
tara.womersley@ed.ac.uk
44-131-650-9836
University of Edinburgh
Source:Eurekalert

Related biology news :

1. Frequent CT scanning for testicular cancer surveillance associated with secondary malignancies
2. Aware Software and Development Services Enable State-of-the-Art Fingerprint Card Scanning
3. Eureka! Air cargo scanning wins top prize
4. Federal Bureau of Investigation Awards Lockheed Martin Biometric Card Scanning Service Contract
5. Study on keeping nuclear bombs from US ports shows misplaced fear over cargo scanning cost
6. Federal Bureau of Investigation Awards Lockheed Martin Biometric Card Scanning Service Contract
7. identiMetrics & BIO-key(R) Provide Biometric Finger Scanning for School Food Service Nationwide
8. New strategy could lead to dose reduction in X-ray imaging
9. Rudolph the red-nosed reindeers cooling strategy revealed
10. Powerful antibody-based strategy suggests a new therapeutic approach to diabetes and obesity
11. BGI develops new strategy to uncover structural variations of human genomes
Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:
(Date:4/15/2016)... 15, 2016 Research and ... Biometrics Market 2016-2020,"  report to their offering.  , ... , ,The global gait biometrics market is expected ... the period 2016-2020. Gait analysis generates ... be used to compute factors that are not ...
(Date:3/29/2016)... LegacyXChange, Inc. (OTC: LEGX ... Protect are pleased to announce our successful effort to ... of writing instruments, ensuring athletes signatures against counterfeiting and ... athletes on LegacyXChange will be assured of ongoing proof ... Bill Bollander , CEO states, "By inserting ...
(Date:3/18/2016)... --> --> ... & Unmanned Vehicles, Physical infrastructure and Perimeter Surveillance & Detection ... border security market and the continuing migration crisis in the ... has led visiongain to publish this unique report, ... defence & security companies in the border security ...
Breaking Biology News(10 mins):
(Date:5/3/2016)... ... May 03, 2016 , ... According to world renowned ... definitive prostate cancer treatment, patients traditionally had two main treatment options: surgery or radiation. ... be made. , New technology has enabled doctors to administer higher doses of ...
(Date:5/2/2016)... , May 2, 2016 ... that its technology partner Mannin Research Inc. will be ... (ARVO), which takes place from May 1-5, 2016 in ... will be meeting with its vendors and research partners. ... business development goals and other collaborative opportunities for the ...
(Date:5/2/2016)... ... 02, 2016 , ... StarNet Communications Corp, ( http://www.starnet.com/ ) a leading publisher ... Remote Desktop modules to its flagship X-Win32 PC X server. The new modules ... the user’s PC over encrypted SSH. , Traditionally, users of PC X servers deploy ...
(Date:4/29/2016)... ... ... The MIT bioLogic design team has won multiple A' Design Awards ... be applied to fabric and formed into living interfaces between body and environment. They ... The team harvested Natto cells and applied them to fabric with custom 3D printers.The ...
Breaking Biology Technology: