Navigation Links
New insights into DNA repair process may spur better cancer therapies
Date:9/30/2013

DURHAM, N.C. By detailing a process required for repairing DNA breakage, scientists at the Duke Cancer Institute have gained a better understanding of how cells deal with the barrage of damage that can contribute to cancer and other diseases.

The insights, reported online the week of Sept. 30, 2013, in the journal Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, build on earlier work by the research team and identify new prospects for developing cancer therapies.

The researchers have focused on a complex series of events that cells routinely undertake to repair DNA damaged by sun exposure, smoking and even normal metabolism. If not correctly repaired, DNA breakages can result in cellular damage leading to cancer.

"We never had good assays to measure how DNA breaks are repaired, and there were few good tools to study how that repair unfolds at the molecular level," said senior author Michael Kastan, M.D., PhD, executive director of the Duke Cancer Institute. "Our work for the first time enables us to both sensitively measure the repair of DNA breaks and study the molecular mechanisms by which they occur."

DNA inside the cell faces a challenge for repairing itself because it is so compacted in the cell nucleus. Tightly wrapped in a complex of proteins called chromatin, the DNA is spooled like thread around a protein structure called a nucleosome. DNA could suffer a breakage that would go unheeded if it remained deep within the reel.

The system developed by Kastan and colleagues induced DNA breakage at defined points on the DNA strands, enabling researchers to chronicle events as the cells launched the repair process.

What they described for the first time was a choreographed interaction in which the tightly wound DNA was temporarily loosened when a key protein, called nucleolin, was recruited to the breakage site, disrupting the nucleosome spool. The process was then reversed when the nucleosome was re-formed after repair was complete.

"Our study demonstrates for the first time the functional importance of nucleosome disruption in DNA repair," Kastan said. "This nucleosome disruption allows DNA repair proteins to access the DNA lesion and begin the process of mending the breakage."

Kastan said the finding provides key insights for how cells remain healthy, as well as how the repair process could potentially be manipulated. New cancer therapies, for instance, could target nucleolin to enhance sensitivity of tumor cells to radiation or chemotherapies, he said.

"This could give us an opportunity to make current treatments more potent," Kastan said. "That would be a next area of research, which we are especially interested in pursuing."


'/>"/>

Contact: Sarah Avery
sarah.avery@duke.edu
919-660-1306
Duke University Medical Center
Source:Eurekalert

Related biology news :

1. Erratic proteins: New insights into a transport mechanism
2. Eyewear Market 2014 Insights and System Refresher Report
3. Global analysis reveals new insights into the ribosome -- with important implications for disease
4. Potential diagnostic marker for zinc status offers insights into the effects of zinc deficiency
5. New insights into neuroblastoma tumor suppressor may provide clues for improved treatment
6. UCLA life scientists present new insights on climate change and species interactions
7. Insights into deadly coral bleaching could help preserve reefs
8. New insights into how genes turn on and off
9. New insights into the development of the heart
10. Peach genome offers insights into breeding strategies for biofuels crops
11. Novel insights into the evolution of protein networks
Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:
(Date:4/13/2017)... 2017 UBM,s Advanced Design and Manufacturing event ... emerging and evolving technology through its 3D Printing and ... alongside the expo portion of the event and feature ... focused on trending topics within 3D printing and smart ... event will take place June 13-15, 2017 at the Jacob ...
(Date:4/11/2017)... 2017 No two people are believed ... New York University Tandon School of Engineering and ... that partial similarities between prints are common enough ... phones and other electronic devices can be more ... lies in the fact that fingerprint-based authentication systems ...
(Date:4/5/2017)... NEW YORK , April 5, 2017 ... security, is announcing that the server component of the ... is known for providing the end-to-end security architecture that ... customers. HYPR has already secured over 15 ... system makers including manufacturers of connected home product suites ...
Breaking Biology News(10 mins):
(Date:5/18/2017)... SANTA BARBARA, CALIFORNIA (PRWEB) , ... May 17, ... ... risk management, technological innovation and business process optimization firm for the life sciences ... the Chairman of the UDIs and Traceability for Medical Devices conference in Brussels, ...
(Date:5/18/2017)... ... May 17, 2017 , ... Many complicated neurological ... to develop Alzheimer’s disease, while men are at greater risk for Parkinson’s disease. ... bias is the aim of a research program at Worcester Polytechnic Institute (WPI) ...
(Date:5/16/2017)... , ... May 16, 2017 ... ... the general availability of its new ProxiMeta™ Hi-C metagenomic deconvolution service. ProxiMeta ... affordably—without culturing or high-molecular-weight DNA extraction—speeding research insights at lower cost. , ...
(Date:5/16/2017)... May 16, 2017 Telehealth has long ... and something that has been kept completely separate ... But according to   Logicalis Healthcare Solutions , ... IT solutions and managed services provider ( www.us.logicalis.com ... overlooked – interrelationship between telehealth, imaging, and EHR ...
Breaking Biology Technology: