Navigation Links
New genes found for inflammatory bowel disease in children
Date:8/31/2008

Researchers have discovered two new genes that increase the risk of developing inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) in childhood.

While further study is needed to identify the specific disease-causing mutations in these new genes, the researchers say the genes are particularly strong candidates to be added to the list of genes already known to affect IBD. "As we continue to find genes that interact with each other and with environmental influences in this complex, chronic disease, we are building the foundation for personalized treatments tailored to a patient's genetic profile," said co-first author Robert N. Baldassano, M.D., director of the Center for Pediatric Inflammatory Bowel Disease at The Children's Hospital of Philadelphia.

"We will resequence the gene regions we have identified to pinpoint the causative mutations in these genes," added study leader Hakon Hakonarson, M.D., Ph.D., director of the Center for Applied Genomics at Children's Hospital. "We strongly suspect one gene will provide a compelling target for drug development, given what's known about its biology."

Both authors direct research programs at Children's Hospital and are also faculty members of the University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine. Their study, performed in collaboration with researchers from the Medical College of Wisconsin, The University of Utah, Cincinnati Children's Hospital and two research hospitals in Italy, appears in advance online publication Aug. 31 in Nature Genetics.

IBD is a painful, chronic inflammation of the gastrointestinal tract, affecting about two million children and adults in the United States. Of that number, about half suffer from Crohn's disease, which can affect any part of the gastrointestinal tract, and half have ulcerative colitis, which is limited to the large intestine.

IBD that begins in childhood tends to be more severe than adult-onset disease, and is more likely to affect the colon than other areas of the GI tract. Those age-related differences in IBD spurred the current research team to do their gene hunting in childhood-onset disease. "Although the gene variants we found may have a stronger signal in pediatric IBD than in adult-onset IBD, we do not believe them to be limited to varieties of the disease that begin in childhood," said Baldassano.

The researchers performed a genome-wide association study, searching for genetic variations in DNA samples from 1,000 patients with childhood-onset IBD, compared to samples from 4,250 healthy subjects. Both patients and controls were of European ancestry.

In addition to finding gene variations previously reported by other groups, the study team identified two novel gene variants, one on chromosome 20 and the other on chromosome 21. They then replicated their findings with studies using additional samples from other sources.

The researchers say that the TNFRSF6B gene on chromosome 20 is a compelling candidate, because it is already known to participate in the biological pathway of a protein called tumor necrosis factor (TNF). TNF is a cytokine, a chemical messenger that plays a key role in the harmful inflammation characteristic of IBD.

Some current treatments for IBD use monoclonal antibodies that selectively bind to a type of TNF involved in the disease (Among those drugs are infliximab, adalimumab and certolizumab). "As we better understand the complex gene interactions in IBD, we may be able to diagnose patients by their genetic profile to predict who will better respond to anti-TNF drugs," said Hakonarson. Anti-TNF medications such as those mentioned above are currently given intravenously or as injections, said Baldassano, who added, "If better knowledge of the disease pathway enables pharmaceutical companies to develop anti-TNF drugs in pill form, the medications will be easier to deliver as well as more customized to each patient."

The study team also found an association between ulcerative colitis and genes on the major histocompatiblity complex (MHC) on chromosome 6. The MHC is a large group of genes with important roles in the immune system, and this finding may help refine diagnostic techniques that would allow physicians to administer more specific therapies to their patients.


'/>"/>

Contact: Rachel Salis-Silverman
Salis@email.chop.edu
267-426-6063
Children's Hospital of Philadelphia
Source:Eurekalert

Related biology news :

1. Location, location, location important for genes, too
2. Study shows more genes are controlled by biological clocks
3. Genes and nutrition influence caste in unusual species of harvester ant
4. Mount Sinai researchers discover technology that silences genes
5. Genes may make some people more prone to anxiety
6. Obesity genes revealed
7. Various species genes evolve to minimize protein production errors
8. Smothered genes combine with mutations to yield poor outcome in cancer patients
9. Scientists discover key patterns in the packaging of genes
10. The first autism disease genes
11. Researchers reveal types of genes necessary for brain development
Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:
(Date:3/30/2017)... LOS ANGELES , March 30, 2017  On ... Hack the Genome hackathon at ... This exciting two-day competition will focus on developing health ... experience. Hack the Genome is ... has been tremendous. The world,s largest companies in the ...
(Date:3/28/2017)... 28, 2017 The report "Video ... Monitors, Servers, Storage Devices), Software (Video Analytics, VMS), and ... Global Forecast to 2022", published by MarketsandMarkets, the market ... is projected to reach USD 75.64 Billion by 2022, ... The base year considered for the study is 2016 ...
(Date:3/23/2017)... The report "Gesture Recognition and Touchless Sensing Market by Technology (Touch-based and ... 2022", published by MarketsandMarkets, the market is expected to be worth USD 18.98 ... Continue Reading ... ...      ...
Breaking Biology News(10 mins):
(Date:8/16/2017)... , ... August 16, 2017 , ... ... microbe delivery system, announced it has secured $2M in funding from an impressive ... Angels, Carmen Innovations, and SVG Thrive Fund. With this investment, 3Bar is broadening ...
(Date:8/15/2017)... ... ... Kapstone Medical is proud to announce that it has reached ... inventors develop and safeguard their latest innovations. The company has grown from a ... clients in the United States and around the world. , Company Founder and ...
(Date:8/15/2017)... NY (PRWEB) , ... August 15, 2017 , ... ... first time on Immuno-Oncology 360° (IO360°) programming through a series of upcoming panels and ... held February 7-9, 2018, at The Roosevelt Hotel in New York City. , “With ...
(Date:8/14/2017)... ... August 14, 2017 , ... The Conference Forum has confirmed the ... place on September 6, 2017 at the Marriott Copley Place in Boston, MA. , ... Informatics, and Regulatory Strategy, Pfizer Innovative Research Lab, Pfizer, who leads 19 industry speakers ...
Breaking Biology Technology: