Navigation Links
New formula invented for microscope viewing, substitutes for federally controlled drug
Date:5/17/2013

Researchers at Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey, and City University of New York have invented a proprietary new formulation called VisikolTM that effectively clears organisms to be viewed under microscopes. Visikol can be used in place of chloral hydrate, which is one of the few high-quality clearing solutions currently available but which is tightly regulated by the Drug Enforcement Administration (DEA) due to its use as a narcotic.

Clearing solutions, or clearing agents, are vital for viewing organisms under a microscope. Without them, microscope images become refracted and scattered, impairing the clarity of vision. Clearing solutions are used to identify specimens and examine their anatomy by "clearing" them, increasing the transparency of the specimen by rendering some components of a specimen invisible in order to better view other components of interest.

One of the most common clearing solutions is chloral hydrate, which is used for everything from studying plant organelles to authenticating herbal plant species for medicinal purposes. Its popularity in the research community, government, and industry stems from its high refractive index, which allows a high magnitude of light to pass through the medium and make specimens crystal clear under the microscope.

However, chloral hydrate is difficult and expensive to obtain, as it is regulated by the DEA as a Schedule IV controlled substance. Chloral hydrate is prescribed medically as a sedative, depressant, pain reliever, and hypnotic, and overdoses can lead to serious health issues, including fatal heart conditions. Chloral hydrate has also found use as an illicit drug, and has been used in sexual assaults. Thus, possession of chloral hydrate requires costly, annual permits and time-consuming paperwork. Despite its advantages for research and industry, chloral hydrate is an impractical, and sometimes impossible, choice for scientists.

To replace chloral hydrate and alleviate the "red tape" associated with clearing solutions, university researchers invented Visikol, a polychlorinated alcohol mixture that is safer, cheaper, and not federally regulated by the DEA. Thomas Villani and Professor James Simon of Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey, with Professor Adolfina Koroch of City University of New York, developed and then tested the utility of Visikol alongside chloral hydrate to compare it as an effective replacement.

Villani and colleagues prepared samples of a broad range of fresh and dry plant material with either chloral hydrate or Visikol. They tested plant species that are important in plant biology and genetics research, botanical authentication and herbal pharmacology, and agriculture, including Arabidopsis, ginger, mat, lime basil, and oregano.

Visikol successfully cleared plant materials, creating transparent and detailed specimens of cells, tissues, and rhizomes, for viewing under a microscope light. Visikol also had a higher refractive index than chloral hydrate and served as an agent to mount tissues for microscopic identification. These results are published in the May issue of Applications in Plant Sciences (available for free viewing at http://www.bioone.org/doi/pdf/10.3732/apps.1300016) and are the first report of a replacement solution for chloral hydrate.

Visikol was originally developed as a tool for botanical microscopy; however, it will serve as a useful tool for teaching microscopy to students and professionals. "Since it is not regulated," comments Villani, "it will enable students to experience firsthand what they are taught on the chalkboard." Koroch adds, "It is often difficult for beginners to grasp microscopy, and Visikol's ease of use will help teachers engage and motivate students by allowing them to easily see biology in stunning detail."

In addition, Visikol's use extends far beyond research applications. "We expect Visikol to be especially useful in quality control, aiding in rapid screening for agricultural disease vectors," says Villani, as "small insects like mites are a common disease vector for agricultural crops and can be easily viewed within plant tissues using Visikol." Visikol is likely to be used as a general tool for specimens under the microscope, as it has wide application to all organisms and tissues.


'/>"/>

Contact: Beth Parada
apps@botany.org
American Journal of Botany
Source:Eurekalert

Related biology news :

1. Study shows botanical formula fights prostate cancer
2. Reduced glycerin formulation of tenofovir vaginal gel safe for rectal use
3. Hazelnuts improve infant formula
4. Liquid glucagon formulation discovered for potential use in artificial pancreas systems
5. Maths formula leads researchers to source of pollution
6. Breast milk promotes a different gut flora growth than infant formulas
7. UC Riverside developing biofuel formulations for California
8. New, cost-cutting approach to formulating pest-killing fungi
9. Human eye inspires clog-free ink jet printer invented by MU researcher
10. Beyond the microscope: Identifying specific cancers using molecular analysis
11. Nature: Microscope looks into cells of living fish
Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:
(Date:5/9/2016)... May 9, 2016 Elevay is ... to expanding freedom for high net worth professionals seeking ... today,s globally connected world, there is still no substitute ... ever duplicate sealing your deal with a firm handshake. ... by taking advantage of citizenship via investment programs like ...
(Date:4/26/2016)... LONDON , April 26, 2016 ... a product subsidiary of Infosys (NYSE: ... to integrate the Onegini mobile security platform with ... http://photos.prnewswire.com/prnh/20151104/283829LOGO ) The integration will ... to access and transact across channels. Using this ...
(Date:4/15/2016)... , April 15, 2016 ... the,  "Global Gait Biometrics Market 2016-2020,"  report to ... http://photos.prnewswire.com/prnh/20160330/349511LOGO ) , ,The global gait biometrics ... of 13.98% during the period 2016-2020. ... angles, which can be used to compute factors ...
Breaking Biology News(10 mins):
(Date:6/24/2016)... ... June 24, 2016 , ... Researchers at the Universita Politecnica delle Marche in ... peritoneal or pleural mesothelioma. Their findings are the subject of a new article on ... biomarkers are signposts in the blood, lung fluid or tissue of mesothelioma patients that ...
(Date:6/23/2016)... A person commits a crime, and the detective ... the criminal down. An outbreak of foodborne illness ... (FDA) uses DNA evidence to track down the bacteria that ... It,s not. The FDA has increasingly used a complex, cutting-edge ... illnesses. Put as simply as possible, whole genome sequencing is ...
(Date:6/23/2016)... 2016   EpiBiome , a precision microbiome engineering ... debt financing from Silicon Valley Bank (SVB). The financing ... advance its drug development efforts, as well as purchase ... "SVB has been an incredible strategic partner to us ... bank would provide," said Dr. Aeron Tynes Hammack ...
(Date:6/23/2016)...  Blueprint Bio, a company dedicated to identifying, protecting ... has closed its Series A funding round, according to ... "We have received a commitment from Forentis Fund that ... meet our current goals," stated Matthew Nunez . ... complete validation on the current projects in our pipeline, ...
Breaking Biology Technology: