Navigation Links
New findings provide cost, benefit data for Florida citrus industry
Date:1/18/2011

LAKE ALFRED, FL Harvesting is an expensive enterprise for Florida's important citrus industry. In fact, harvesting can account for as much as 50% of the production cost for citrus crops. To improve production and decrease costs associated with hand harvesting, Florida's researchers and citrus producers have been working for decades to develop cost-effective mechanical harvesting technologies.

In a new study in HortScience, Timothy M. Spann and Michelle D. Danyluk from the University of Florida's Citrus Research and Education Center, designed experiments to determine the amount and types of debris in mechanically harvested loads of sweet oranges compared with hand-harvested controls. The research yielded data that will be valuable for evaluating the costs and benefits of mechanical harvesting, and should assist agricultural engineers working to develop debris removal systems for mechanical harvesting machines.

Although mechanical harvesting is advantageous to many in the citrus industry, the technology is not without its drawbacks. Orange juice processors report that mechanical removal of leaves, twigs, and branches results in more debris being delivered to processing plants. "Any increase in debris entering the processing plant increases operational costs as a result of machine damage, labor to remove the debris, and disposal costs," explained Spann.

Spann and Danyluk collected debris samples from three different harvest systems: hand harvesting (control), continuous travel canopy shake and catch harvesting system, and tractor-powered continuous travel canopy shake harvester. Study results indicated that mechanical harvesting increased the amount of debris per load of fruit by as much as 250% compared with hand-harvested fruit. In addition, the amount of sand on the surface of mechanically harvested fruit that was picked up from the orchard floor was found to be up to 10 times greater compared with hand-harvested controls.

The researchers found that fruit harvested with the tractor-drawn 3210 system had the most debris of any harvest system. According to the researchers, this finding is counterintuitive. "Fruit harvested by this system are dropped to the ground and picked up by hand and, therefore, should be very clean," they explained. "However, hand labor crews are usually paid per box of fruit harvested, giving them an incentive to move quickly. Thus, many laborers working with the (3210) system will tend to sweep fruit from the orchard floor into their picking sacks rather than picking up individual pieces of fruit and in so doing collect large quantities of debris."

The outcomes of the research will be useful to engineers who work to design debris elimination systems for mechanical harvesting systems, and for economic analyses of the costs of mechanical harvesting. The team noted that tree management practices that may prevent debris from entering the harvesting stream should also be investigated.


'/>"/>

Contact: Michael W. Neff
mwneff@ashs.org
703-836-4606
American Society for Horticultural Science
Source:Eurekalert  

Related biology news :

1. Findings on pollution damage to human airways could yield new therapies
2. 23andMe presents top 10 most interesting genetic findings of 2010
3. Findings suggest new cause, possible treatment for multiple sclerosis
4. Biomedical and health professionals converge in D.C. to absorb new findings in science of informatics
5. Unexpected findings of lead exposure may lead to treating blindness
6. Gynecologist disputes findings
7. New findings pull back curtain on relationship between iron and Alzheimers disease
8. MBL scientists reveal findings of World Ocean Microbe Census
9. New VARI findings next step to growing drought-resistant plants
10. Findings overturn old theory of phytoplankton growth, raise concerns for ocean productivity
11. Scripps Research study overturns decade-old findings in neurobiology
Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:
Related Image:
New findings provide cost, benefit data for Florida citrus industry
(Date:3/17/2016)... , March 17, 2016 ABI Research, ... forecasts the global biometrics market will reach more ... 118% increase from 2015. Consumer electronics, particularly smartphones, ... fingerprint sensors anticipated to reach two billion shipments ... Dimitrios Pavlakis , Research Analyst at ABI ...
(Date:3/15/2016)... Yissum Research Development Company of the ... the Hebrew University, announced today the formation of ... various human biological indicators. Neteera Technologies has completed its ... investors. ... electromagnetic emissions from sweat ducts, enables reliable and speedy ...
(Date:3/14/2016)... 2016 http://www.apimages.com ) - ... - Renvoi : image disponible via AP Images ... --> DERMALOG, le leader de ... lecteurs d,empreintes digitales pour l,enregistrement des réfugiés en ... pour produire des cartes d,identité aux réfugiés. DERMALOG ...
Breaking Biology News(10 mins):
(Date:4/29/2016)... ... 29, 2016 , ... Intelligent Implant Systems announced today that the two-level components ... in the United States. These components expand the capabilities of the system and ... beginning in October of 2015, the company has seen significant sales growth in 1Q ...
(Date:4/28/2016)... 28, 2016 The report "Cryocooler ... Cryocoolers), Service (Technical Support, Product Repairs & Refurbishment, Preventive ... Forecast to 2022", published by MarketsandMarkets, the global market ... 2022, at a CAGR of 7.29% between 2016 and ... and 94 Figures spread through 159 Pages and in-depth ...
(Date:4/28/2016)... ... April 28, 2016 , ... Connecticut Innovations ... growing companies, today announced the launch of VentureClash , a $5 million ... , “VentureClash looks to attract the best early-stage companies here in Connecticut, ...
(Date:4/28/2016)... York, NY (PRWEB) , ... April 28, 2016 ... ... QuickSTAT has made significant investments in recruiting top industry experts, and expanding its ... Platform, which provides industry-leading tools for clients to manage their clinical trial projects. ...
Breaking Biology Technology: