Navigation Links
New cell type offers immunology hope
Date:6/14/2011

A team of Australian scientists has discovered a new type of cell in the immune system.

The new cell type, a kind of white blood cell, belongs to a family of T-cells that play a critical role in protection against infectious disease.

Their findings could ultimately lead to the development of novel drugs that strengthen the immune response against particular types of infectious organisms.

It is also potentially significant for many other important diseases including allergies, cancer and coronary artery disease.

The research team includes Dr Adam Uldrich and Professor Dale Godfrey from the University of Melbourne, Dr Onisha Patel and Professor Jamie Rossjohn from Monash University and Professor Mark Smyth from the Peter MacCallum Cancer Institute.

The discovery, published in the international journal Nature Immunology, is a fundamental advance in understanding the different components of the immune system and how this system casts a net wide enough to catch all kinds of different infectious organisms.

Typically, when the body is threatened with bacterial or viral infection, molecules called T-cell receptors interact with protein fragments (called peptides) from the bacterium or virus, triggering the immune response. This process has been widely studied and leads to the killing of microbes and protection against severe infection.

While the immune system is known to focus on proteins from viruses and bacteria, some T-cells in the immune system (known as NKT cells) can recognise lipid-based, or fatty, molecules. As such, there is great enthusiasm for the potential of these lipid-sensing T-cells in the development of novel vaccines. This team have identified a new type of NKT cell that can specifically target lipids found in the cell walls of bacteria, including Mycobacteria.

Professor Dale Godfrey from the University of Melbourne said the discovery is significant and opens the door to a new avenue of investigation into immunity.

"The identification of a new cell type paves the way for many new studies into the unique function of these cells and how they might be harnessed for the development of new types of vaccines," he said.

Using the Australian Synchrotron, the team produced a molecular image of precisely how the new cell type's T-cell receptor recognises lipid-based molecules.

"The use of the Australian synchrotron was essential for us to undertake our study," Dr Onisha Patel from Monash University said.


'/>"/>

Contact: Rebecca Scott
rebeccas@unimelb.edu.au
61-383-440-181
University of Melbourne
Source:Eurekalert

Related biology news :

1. Worm genome offers clues to evolution of parasitism
2. Advance offers revolution in food safety testing
3. Light pollution offers new global measure of coral reef health
4. Rong Li Lab offers insight into adaptive ability of cells
5. International public-private partnership offers new paradigm for medicinal chemistry
6. UC Davis discovery offers hope for treating kidney cancer
7. New paper offers key insights into how new species emerge
8. Study offers clues to beating hearing loss
9. Fighting global warming offers growth and development opportunities
10. Brown-led team offers first look at how bats land
11. Star Trek-like technology offers noninvasive monitor for patients and athletes
Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:
(Date:6/1/2016)... , June 1, 2016 ... in Election Administration and Criminal Identification to Boost Global ... a recently released TechSci Research report, " Global Biometrics ... Region, Competition Forecast and Opportunities, 2011 - 2021", the ... billion by 2021, on account of growing security concerns ...
(Date:5/20/2016)... , May 20, 2016  VoiceIt is excited ... with VoicePass. By working together, VoiceIt ...  Because VoiceIt and VoicePass take slightly different approaches ... increases both security and usability. ... about this new partnership. "This marketing ...
(Date:5/12/2016)... 12, 2016 WearablesResearch.com , a brand ... overview results from the Q1 wave of its quarterly ... was consumers, receptivity to a program where they would ... health insurance company. "We were surprised to ... Michael LaColla , CEO of Troubadour Research, "primarily ...
Breaking Biology News(10 mins):
(Date:6/24/2016)... 24, 2016  Regular discussions on a range of subjects ... the two entities said Poloz. Speaking at a ... , he pointed to the country,s inflation target, which ... "In certain areas ... have common economic goals, why not sit down and address ...
(Date:6/24/2016)... ... 24, 2016 , ... Researchers at the Universita Politecnica delle Marche in Ancona ... or pleural mesothelioma. Their findings are the subject of a new article on the ... are signposts in the blood, lung fluid or tissue of mesothelioma patients that can ...
(Date:6/23/2016)... June 23, 2016   Boston Biomedical , ... compounds designed to target cancer stemness pathways, announced ... granted Orphan Drug Designation from the U.S. Food ... gastric cancer, including gastroesophageal junction (GEJ) cancer. Napabucasin ... to inhibit cancer stemness pathways by targeting STAT3, ...
(Date:6/23/2016)... , June 23, 2016 Houston ... with the Cy-Fair Sports Association to serve as ... the agreement, Houston Methodist Willowbrook will provide sponsorship ... and connectivity with association coaches, volunteers, athletes and ... with the Cy-Fair Sports Association and to bring ...
Breaking Biology Technology: