Navigation Links
New HIV-1 replication pathway discovered by NYU College of Dentistry researchers
Date:9/18/2013

Current drug treatments for HIV work well to keep patients from developing AIDS, but no one has found a way to entirely eliminate the virus from the human body, so patients continue to require lifelong treatment to prevent them from developing AIDS.

Now, a team of researchers led by Dr. David N. Levy, Associate Professor of Basic Science and Craniofacial Biology at the New York University College of Dentistry (NYUCD), have discovered a new way that HIV-1 reproduces itself which could advance the search for new ways to combat infection.

For decades, scientists have been confident that HIV-1, the virus that causes AIDS, must insert its genetic material into a cell's DNA in order to reproduce. This process, called "integration," makes the virus a permanent part of the cell. Some of these infected cells can remain as long as the person is alive, and this is one reason why HIV+ individuals must remain on anti-HIV drugs for life.

Dr. Levy's National Institutes of Health (NIH) funded research, "HIV-1 replication without integration," published today on-line in the Journal of Virology, with lead author Dr. Benjamin Trinit, a post-doctoral fellow in Dr. Levy's laboratory, has shown HIV-1 can sometimes skip this integration step entirely.

"Although this is not the virus' main method for replicating, having this option available can help HIV survive," said Dr. Levy. "These new findings suggest one mechanism by which HIV may be surviving in the face of antiviral drugs, and suggests new avenues for research into eliminating infection."

The integration step is highly inefficient and actually fails up to 99% of the time, leaving most viruses stranded outside of the safe harbor of cell's DNA. It has been assumed that these stranded, or "unintegrated" viruses were unable to reproduce, but Dr. Levy's team has found that if the conditions are right they can generate new viruses that infect new cells.

The team also found that the unintegrated viruses can survive for many weeks in cells, allowing HIV to "hide out" in a dormant state. The ability of HIV-1 to go dormant helps it avoid elimination by antiviral drugs and immune responses.

"There is intense interest by researchers in the idea that new drugs might be developed to help to completely eliminate the virus from infected individuals," said Dr. Levy. "We think that the new replication mechanism we have found could provide a target for drugs designed to eliminate infection."

Dr Levy notes, an interesting phenomenon which other researchers have observed is that some bacteria which live in our mouths can stimulate HIV-1 to emerge from its dormant state.

"NYUCD has some terrific groups of researchers who are expert in oral flora and HIV, so we'll be quite interested in working with them to find out how oral health might influence the new replication pathway my group has discovered," added Dr. Levy.


'/>"/>

Contact: Christopher James
christopher.james@nyu.edu
212-998-6876
New York University
Source:Eurekalert

Related biology news :

1. Synthetic derivatives of THC may weaken HIV-1 infection to enhance antiviral therapies
2. DNA replication protein also has a role in mitosis, cancer
3. Protein involved in DNA replication, centrosome regulation linked to dwarfism, small brain size
4. Scripps Research Institute scientists describe elusive replication machinery of flu viruses
5. Pitt team finds Achilles Heel of key HIV replication protein
6. Researchers find novel mechanism regulating replication of insulin-producing beta cells
7. CNIO researchers capture the replication of the human genome for the first time
8. New agent inhibits HCV replication in mouse models -- No resistance seen
9. UC Santa Barbara researchers discover genetic link between visual pathways of hydras and humans
10. Researchers uncover molecular pathway through which common yeast becomes fungal pathogen
11. Scientists win $2 million to study new pathway in development and maintenance of lymphoma
Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:
(Date:4/13/2017)... April 13, 2017 UBM,s Advanced Design and ... will feature emerging and evolving technology through its 3D ... will run alongside the expo portion of the event ... and demonstrations focused on trending topics within 3D printing ... and manufacturing event will take place June 13-15, 2017 at ...
(Date:4/11/2017)... , April 11, 2017 No two ... researchers at the New York University Tandon School ... Engineering have found that partial similarities between prints ... used in mobile phones and other electronic devices ... The vulnerability lies in the fact that ...
(Date:4/5/2017)... , April 5, 2017 Today ... announcing that the server component of the HYPR platform ... for providing the end-to-end security architecture that empowers biometric ... HYPR has already secured over 15 million users ... including manufacturers of connected home product suites and physical ...
Breaking Biology News(10 mins):
(Date:6/15/2017)... ... June 15, 2017 , ... ... herbicides give farmers new options for managing Palmer amaranth and other broadleaf weeds ... say special precautions are necessary. Auxin herbicides are known to drift and to ...
(Date:6/15/2017)... ... June 15, 2017 , ... ... follows an artist’s journey through creative experimentation and interdisciplinary collaboration. Feature Creep, a ... July 22nd. An opening reception will be held at EKG, located at 3600 ...
(Date:6/15/2017)... ... June 15, 2017 , ... ... for DuPont Biofuels, will be speaking at Bloomberg’s 2017 Sustainable Business Summit: ... other leading environmental and sustainability officials on a panel titled “Developing a Corporate ...
(Date:6/14/2017)... ... 2017 , ... Slone Partners welcomed a panel of premier ... search firm, “Building Value in Precision Medicine: Can We Overcome the Obstacles?” , ... an open discussion with expert panelists Troy Cox, CEO of Foundation Medicine, Barbara ...
Breaking Biology Technology: