Navigation Links
Nanotube-producing bacteria show manufacturing promise
Date:12/7/2007

RIVERSIDE, Calif. Two engineers at the University of California, Riverside are part of a binational team that has found semiconducting nanotubes produced by living bacteria a discovery that could help in the creation of a new generation of nanoelectronic devices.

The research team believes this is the first time nanotubes have been shown to be produced by biological rather than chemical means. It opens the door to the possibility of cheaper and more environmentally friendly manufacture of electronic materials.

Study results appear in today's issue of the early edition of the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.

The team, including Nosang V. Myung, associate professor of chemical and environmental engineering in the Bourns College of Engineering, and his postdoctoral researcher Bongyoung Yoo, found the bacterium Shewanella facilitates the formation of arsenic-sulfide nanotubes that have unique physical and chemical properties not produced by chemical agents.

We have shown that a jar with a bug in it can create potentially useful nanostructures, Myung said. Nanotubes are of particular interest in materials science because the useful properties of a substance can be finely tuned according to the diameter and the thickness of the tubes.

The whole realm of electronic devices which power our world, from computers to solar cells, today depend on chemical manufacturing processes which use tremendous energy, and leave behind toxic metals and chemicals. Myung said a growing movement in science and engineering is looking for ways to produce semiconductors in more ecologically friendly ways.

Two members of the research team, Hor Gil Hur and Ji-Hoon Lee from Gwangju Institute of Science and Technology (GIST), Korea, first discovered something unexpected happening when they attempted to remediate arsenic contamination using the metal-reducing bacterium Shewanella. Myung, who specializes in electro-chemical material synthesis and device fabrication, was able to characterize the resulting nano-material.

The photoactive arsenic-sulfide nanotubes produced by the bacteria behave as metals with electrical and photoconductive properties. The researchers report that these properties may also provide novel functionality for the next generation of semiconductors in nano- and opto-electronic devices.

In a process that is not yet fully understood, the Shewanella bacterium secretes polysacarides that seem to produce the template for the arsenic sulfide nanotubes, Myung explained. The practical significance of this technique would be much greater if a bacterial species were identified that could produce nanotubes of cadmium sulfide or other superior semiconductor materials, he added.

This is just a first step that points the way to future investigation, he said. Each species of Shewanella might have individual implications for manufacturing properties.


'/>"/>

Contact: Iqbal Pittalwala
iqbal@ucr.edu
951-827-6050
University of California - Riverside  
Source:Eurekalert

Related biology news :

1. Shuttle brings space-grown strep bacteria back for study
2. The worlds oldest bacteria
3. Bacteria from sponges make new pharmaceuticals
4. Boston University biomedical engineers find chink in bacterias armor
5. University of Leicester scientists discover technique to help friendly bacteria
6. Spaceflight shown to alter ability of bacteria to cause disease
7. A tiny pinch from a z-ring helps bacteria cells divide
8. Legionnaires bacterial proteins work together to survive
9. Scripps research team blocks bacterial communication system to prevent deadly staph infections
10. NSF awards Stevens team $1 million for research on smart, bacteria-repellent nanohydrogels
11. Chemical compound present in detergents produce bacteria alterations in agricultural soils
Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:
Related Image:
Nanotube-producing bacteria show manufacturing promise
(Date:4/6/2017)... Forecasts by Product Type (EAC), Biometrics, Card-Based ... & Logistics, Government & Public Sector, Utilities / Energy ... Nuclear Power), Industrial, Retail, Business Organisation (BFSI), Hospitality & ... for a definitive report on the $27.9bn Access Control ... ...
(Date:4/4/2017)... --  EyeLock LLC , a leader of iris-based identity ... and Trademark Office (USPTO) has issued U.S. Patent No. ... iris image with a face image acquired in sequence ... th issued patent. "The issuance ... multi-modal biometric capabilities that have recently come to market ...
(Date:3/30/2017)... -- Trends, opportunities and forecast in this market to ... AFIS, iris recognition, facial recognition, hand geometry, vein recognition, ... industry (government and law enforcement, commercial and retail, health ... and by region ( North America , ... , and the Rest of the World) ...
Breaking Biology News(10 mins):
(Date:5/23/2017)... ... May 23, 2017 , ... ... cardiovascular cells for research and the development of cardiac regeneration therapies. The ... large numbers of cardiomyocytes (hPSC-CMs). Due to varying differentiation efficiencies, further enrichment ...
(Date:5/23/2017)... ... May 22, 2017 , ... NetDimensions has been ... Aragon Research Globe™ for Corporate Learning, 2017. , Aragon Research defines Leaders as ... and effectively perform against those strategies. NetDimensions’ ranking as a Leader due to ...
(Date:5/23/2017)... ... 2017 , ... Vortex Biosciences , provider of circulating tumor cell (CTC) ... cells using Vortex microfluidic technology ” in Nature Precision Oncology on May 8th. ... Carlo and Dr. Matthew Rettig at the University of California, Los Angeles. The publication ...
(Date:5/23/2017)... PA. (PRWEB) , ... May 23, 2017 , ... ... Clinical Works as Vice President of Clinical Operations. She brings years of ... and Yaupon Therapeutics. From her professional foundation as a licensed occupational therapist, through ...
Breaking Biology Technology: