Navigation Links
NSF awards 'Life in Transition' grants to University of Oklahoma professors
Date:10/22/2009

The connection among living systems and earth's history is the focus of National Science Foundation grants awarded to University of Oklahoma zoology professor Lawrence Weider and botany and microbiology research assistant professor Amy V. Callaghan.

Weider and colleagues will investigate how aquatic organisms, especially the water flea, Daphnia, cope with drastically altered environments caused by nutrient pollution. The study is the first of its type and targets lakes inCanada and Minnesota where Daphnia diapausing eggs have laiddormant for more than 50 years. The researchers will compare the effects of phosphorus on aquatic life today vs. that of 50 years ago by hatching out the eggs and comparing changes in their physiology and genetic structure.

Weider and collaborators will use "resurrection ecology" methods to examine how lakes and ponds enriched with nutrients such as phosphorus influence microevolutionary change in organisms, such as Daphnia. Resurrecting long-dormant decades-old eggs from lake sediments will allow testing to determine how microevolutionary changes in response to nutrient enrichment occurred during the past century.

In his laboratory at the OU Biological Station, Weider will study the effects of long-term pollution on aquatic ecosystems while providing valuable information on how organisms evolve in natural environments in collaboration with Punidan Jeyasingh, assistant professor of zoology at Oklahoma State University and colleagues at Indiana University. The total budget for the three-year project is $780,000.

Callaghan's research focuses on sulfate-reducing bacteria that utilize petroleum hydrocarbons as growth substrates. Alkanes, which are important components of petroleum, were traditionally considered to be biologically inert in the absence of oxygen. However, microorganisms have evolved unique ways of activating alkanes anaerobically. Thesemechanisms have recently been discovered and play an important role in the environmental life cycle of these compounds, especially, in the context of the ecological impact of oil spills.

From an industrial standpoint, oil companies desire to learn more about alkane degrading bacteria and how to monitor microbial communities because of their involvement in the biocorrosion of pipelines and reservoir souring. Furthermore, there is significant interest in the treatmentof detrimental paraffin deposition (long-chain alkanes) in pipelines and on hydrocarbon extraction equipment. Callaghan hypothesizes that anaerobic microorganisms might be able to degrade paraffins via mechanisms similar to those observed for shorter alkanes.

This research looks at the biochemistry and genetics of the sulfate-reducing bacteria involved in anaerobic alkane degradation via a combination of metagenomics, transcriptomics and metabolite profiling. Callaghan received $725,000 for the three-year project and will collaborate with Boris Wawrik and Joseph Suflita, professors in the OU botany and microbiology department.

The NSF biological sciences directorate awarded 61 grants totaling $26 million to university researchers in the United States to foster transformative advances across diverse fields.


'/>"/>

Contact: Jana Smith
jana.smith@ou.edu
405-325-1322
University of Oklahoma
Source:Eurekalert

Related biology news :

1. New research examining essential drugs, emerging botanicals supported by USP Awards
2. Research with wood ducks earns graduate student 2 national awards
3. National Science Foundation awards grant to Oklahoma structural biology group
4. National Science Foundations awards grant to Oklahoma structural biology group
5. EPA awards competitive grants for students to design sustainable technologies that help environment and economy
6. NHLBI awards $11 million for molecular roadmap to chronic lung diseases
7. NOAA awards funds to improve toxic algal bloom predictions in the Western Gulf of Mexico
8. International Rett Syndrome Foundation awards $2M for cutting-edge Rett syndrome research
9. Academies announce winners of 2009 Communication Awards
10. Siebel Foundation awards top UC San Diego bioengineering graduate students
11. WPI receives $1.3 million in federal awards for ongoing research in the life sciences
Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:
(Date:4/19/2017)... The global military biometrics market ... by the presence of several large global players. The ... major players - 3M Cogent, NEC Corporation, M2SYS Technology, ... 61% of the global military biometric market in 2016. ... military biometrics market boast global presence, which has catapulted ...
(Date:4/17/2017)... NXT-ID, Inc. (NASDAQ: NXTD ) ("NXT-ID" ... its 2016 Annual Report on Form 10-K on Thursday April 13, ... ... the Investor Relations section of the Company,s website at http://www.nxt-id.com ... http://www.sec.gov . 2016 Year Highlights: ...
(Date:4/13/2017)... April 13, 2017 According to a new market ... Identity Analytics, Identity Administration, and Authorization), Service, Authentication Type, Deployment Mode, Vertical, ... Market is expected to grow from USD 14.30 Billion in 2017 to ... of 17.3%. ... MarketsandMarkets Logo ...
Breaking Biology News(10 mins):
(Date:8/11/2017)... ... August 11, 2017 , ... A staple in the community for ... will incorporate important key elements including a new digital marketing strategy and updated logo. ... them, Bill Miller has partnered with the South Texas Blood & Tissue Center for ...
(Date:8/11/2017)... (PRWEB) , ... August 11, 2017 , ... ... food production, and, in particular, more natural alternatives to synthetic ingredients,” said Matt ... of Third Wave, with the established manufacturing presence and know-how of Biorigin will ...
(Date:8/10/2017)... ... August 09, 2017 , ... Teachers from three Philadelphia ... August 14th through the 16th, the University City Science Center will kick off ... 2016, provides Philadelphia-based middle school educators an opportunity for professional development related to ...
(Date:8/10/2017)... ... ... Each year in the United States more than 300,000 people are hospitalized for ... even worse, the one-year mortality rate is high, ranging from 12 percent to 37 ... Medical Center (Sacramento) and Second Xiangya Hospital of the Central-South University (Hunan, China) might ...
Breaking Biology Technology: