Navigation Links
NOAA researchers see dramatic decline of endangered white abalone
Date:7/2/2012

Scientists from NOAA's National Marine Fisheries Service report a significant decline of endangered white abalone off the coast of Southern California in the journal Biological Conservation.

"Since 2002, we have been surveying white abalone off San Diego using an underwater remotely operated vehicle (ROV)," said Kevin Stierhoff, research fisheries biologist at NOAA's Southwest Fisheries Science Center in La Jolla, and lead author of the journal article. "In the absence of fishing, we hoped to see the population stabilize or increase. However, our latest assessment using data collected in 2008 and 2010 indicates that the white abalone population has continued to decline by approximately 78 percent over the last ten years."

These results confirm predictions made by scientists in 2001 suggesting that wild populations had dwindled to levels that were too low to support successful reproduction, and that as animals died of natural causes, a new generation would not emerge to replace them. White abalone are "broadcast spawners," projecting eggs and sperm into the water column at the same time for fertilization. If there is not a suitable partner close by, it is unlikely any offspring will be produced.

"Unfortunately we have continued to see white abalone grow larger, older and further apart with no evidence of significant numbers of offspring for the last ten years," said John Butler, a research biologist at NOAA's Southwest Fisheries Science Center and co-author of the article. "While it could be the juveniles are hiding or too difficult to see, it is more likely that the species is just failing to reproduce."

Scientists see a serious need to enhance populations of white abalone by out-planting individuals into the wild using a captive breeding program. Currently, University of California Davis Bodega Bay Marine Laboratory oversees a number of white abalone breeding facilities in California through a special permit from NOAA to work with the endangered species.

"We are at a point where a successful breeding program is critical to the survival of the species," said Melissa Neuman, recovery coordinator for white abalone and co-author of the journal article. "At this point, without human intervention, the species could go extinct within our lifetimes."

In 2001, white abalone became the first marine invertebrate listed under the Endangered Species Act. The marine mollusk was once abundant off the coasts of Baja and Southern California, where it thrived in waters from 15 to 200 feet deep, making it the deepest dwelling abalone species in California.

For a short time, white abalone supported a commercial fishery in North America. During a ten-year period from 1969 to 1978, an estimated harvest of over 350,000 adults was landed. By the mid-1980's, landings fell to near zero, and the commercial fishery was closed in 1997.


'/>"/>

Contact: Jim Milbury
Kevin.Stierhoff@noaa.gov
562-980-4006
NOAA National Marine Fisheries Service
Source:Eurekalert

Related biology news :

1. BESC researchers tap into genetic reservoir of heat-loving bacteria
2. Researchers and communities at risk join forces in volcano study
3. Penn researchers improve living tissues with 3-D printed vascular networks made from sugar
4. BUSM researchers identify role of FOXO1 gene in Parkinsons disease
5. How sweet it is: Tomato researchers discover link between ripening, color and taste
6. Researchers discover potential explanation for why a diet high in DHA improves memory
7. Rice researchers develop paintable battery
8. UMass Medical School researchers discover a new role for RNAi
9. Researchers develop new method for analyzing cell function
10. Maths formula leads researchers to source of pollution
11. 7 pharmaceutical companies join academic researchers to speed TB drug discovery
Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:
(Date:4/11/2017)... 11, 2017 No two people are ... the New York University Tandon School of Engineering ... found that partial similarities between prints are common ... mobile phones and other electronic devices can be ... vulnerability lies in the fact that fingerprint-based authentication ...
(Date:4/6/2017)... April 6, 2017 Forecasts by ... Document Readers, by End-Use (Transportation & Logistics, Government & ... Gas & Fossil Generation Facility, Nuclear Power), Industrial, Retail, ... Are you looking for a definitive report ... ...
(Date:4/5/2017)... YORK , April 5, 2017 Today ... is announcing that the server component of the HYPR ... known for providing the end-to-end security architecture that empowers ... HYPR has already secured over 15 million ... makers including manufacturers of connected home product suites and ...
Breaking Biology News(10 mins):
(Date:10/12/2017)... , ... October 12, 2017 , ... ... today announced the three Winners and six Finalists of the 2017 Blavatnik Regional ... by the Blavatnik Family Foundation and administered by the New York Academy of ...
(Date:10/12/2017)... (PRWEB) , ... October 12, 2017 , ... ... partners with the pharmaceutical and biotechnology industries to improve patient outcomes and quality ... Several trends in analytical testing are being attributed to new regulatory requirements for ...
(Date:10/11/2017)... ... ... Personal eye wash is a basic first aid supply for any work environment, but most ... you rinse first if a dangerous substance enters both eyes? It’s one less decision, and ... unique dual eye piece. , “Whether its dirt and debris, or an acid or alkali, ...
(Date:10/11/2017)... and LAGUNA HILLS, Calif. , Oct. 11, ... Research, London (ICR) and University of ... SkylineDx,s prognostic tool to risk-stratify patients with multiple myeloma (MM), ... nine . The University of Leeds ... funded by Myeloma UK, and ICR will perform the testing ...
Breaking Biology Technology: