Navigation Links
NOAA divers capture invasive lionfish in the Virgin Islands National Park
Date:8/6/2010

Divers identified and killed a 15 cm long lionfish in Fish Bay along the southern coast of St. John, making this the fourth such capture and kill of the invasive fish in the Virgin Islands National Park.

The lionfish was first spotted July 15, 2010 and captured the following day within 10 meters of the original sighting. A team of divers and scientists from NOAA's National Centers for Coastal Ocean Science and the National Park Service were in the area collecting data aimed at evaluating the health of corals, fish and invertebrates in a ten-year long project funded by NOAA's Coral Reef Conservation Program. This is the first time during the annual surveys the research team has sighted a lionfish. Governments across the Caribbean are concerned by the potential environmental impact of this species, which is multiplying rapidly across the region and consuming native fish at unsustainable rates in some locations.

"Lionfish pose a huge threat to the coral reef ecosystems of the U.S. Virgin Islands. The native fish populations are essentially defenseless in the face of this threat. And once established, lionfish are very difficult to control," noted Rafe Boulon, Chief of Resource Management for the Virgin Islands National Park and the Virgin Islands Coral Reef National Monument.

Native to the Indo-Pacific, Lionfish were first spotted in the US Virgin Islands off the coast of St. Croix in 2008. NOAA scientists with the National Centers for Coastal Ocean Science were the first to identify their first appearance in North Carolina and have been leading research and monitoring efforts since then. They have been in close collaboration with the Reef Environmental Education Foundation, scientists from Simon Fraser University, and the US Geological Survey to undertake critical research on lionfish biology, ecology, and environmental impacts.

In addition, NOAA is studying lionfish control strategies and has launched an "Eat Lionfish" campaign, which works with chefs, fishermen, and wholesalers to promote the development of a market for these fish. NOAA scientists have determined that a major fishing effort is required to reduce their numbers and mitigate their impact on reef ecosystems.


'/>"/>

Contact: John Ewald
john.ewald@noaa.gov
240-429-6127
NOAA Headquarters
Source:Eurekalert

Related biology news :

1. Top predators and biodiversity historically pressured in Stellwagen Bank National Marine Sanctuary
2. Scientists uncover global distribution of marine biodiversity
3. Shade-coffee farms support native bees that maintain genetic diversity in tropical forests
4. Extreme archaeology: Divers plumb the mysteries of sacred Maya pools
5. Temperature constancy appears key to tropical biodiversity
6. Bacterial diversity of Tablas de Daimiel studied for first time
7. Conserving nature and dollars: Delivering cost-effective biodiversity protection
8. Ascension Island extinct parsley fern rediscovered during International Year of Biodiversity
9. Biodiversitys holy grail is in the soil
10. Soil-borne pathogens drive tree diversity in forests, study shows
11. Tropical biodiversity is about the neighbors
Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:
(Date:5/24/2016)... 24, 2016 Ampronix facilitates superior patient care by providing unparalleled technology to ... display is the latest premium product recently added to the range of products distributed ... ... ... Imaging- LCD Medical Display- Ampronix News ...
(Date:5/12/2016)... -- WearablesResearch.com , a brand of Troubadour Research ... the Q1 wave of its quarterly wearables survey. A ... to a program where they would receive discounts for ... "We were surprised to see that so ... , CEO of Troubadour Research, "primarily because there are ...
(Date:4/28/2016)... BANGALORE, India , April 28, 2016 /PRNewswire/ ... product subsidiary of Infosys (NYSE: INFY ), and ... global partnership that will provide end customers with ... banking and payment services.      (Logo: http://photos.prnewswire.com/prnh/20130122/589162 ... area for financial services, but it also plays a fundamental ...
Breaking Biology News(10 mins):
(Date:6/27/2016)... 27, 2016  Liquid Biotech USA ... of a Sponsored Research Agreement with The University ... (CTCs) from cancer patients.  The funding will be ... correlate with clinical outcomes in cancer patients undergoing ... then be employed to support the design of ...
(Date:6/24/2016)... ... June 24, 2016 , ... While the majority of ... the Cary 5000 and the 6000i models are higher end machines that use the ... of the spectrophotometer’s light beam from the bottom of the cuvette holder. , ...
(Date:6/23/2016)...   Boston Biomedical , an industry leader ... target cancer stemness pathways, announced that its lead ... Designation from the U.S. Food and Drug Administration ... gastroesophageal junction (GEJ) cancer. Napabucasin is an orally ... stemness pathways by targeting STAT3, and is currently ...
(Date:6/23/2016)... ... 23, 2016 , ... Charm Sciences, Inc. is pleased to ... AOAC Research Institute approval 061601. , “This is another AOAC-RI approval of the ... Vice President of Regulatory and Industrial Affairs. “The Peel Plate methods perform comparably ...
Breaking Biology Technology: