Navigation Links
NIH funds multicenter 'glue grant' to study enzyme function
Date:5/21/2010

May 21, 2010 (BRONX, NY) A multi-institutional team of researchers, including scientists at Albert Einstein College of Medicine of Yeshiva University, has received a prestigious National Institutes of Health (NIH) "Glue Grant" to develop a strategy for discovering the structure and function of unknown enzymes identified in genome-sequencing projects.

The research could improve understanding of the metabolic and chemical diversity that exists in nature and may result in new drug targets for treatments. It may also lead to new enzymes that could prove useful for catalyzing industrial reactions. Over the next five years, the team will receive $33.9 million, of which Einstein will receive approximately $11 million.

Glue Grants, which are issued by the National Institute of General Medical Sciences (NIGMS), a division of the NIH, provide resources to tackle complex problems that are of central importance to biomedical science and beyond the means of any one research group.

In recent years, scientists have sequenced the genomes of thousands of organisms, from bacteria to humans, encompassing more than 10 million genes. But it's not clear what many of these genes do or which proteins they code.

"The specific functions of perhaps half of these genes and the proteins they make are unknown or have been mistakenly characterized," says co-investigator Steven C. Almo, Ph.D., professor of biochemistry and of physiology & biophysics at Einstein. "The consortium will be working to close this gap."

NIGMS currently funds a total of five such multicenter projects. This Glue Grant, known as the Enzyme Function Initiative (EFI), will focus on enzymes proteins that catalyze the chemical reactions required for life and enable organisms to live in complex environments and to adapt to a variety of conditions.

"The knowledge gained from our EFI will give us a better sense of the breadth of enzymatic and metabolic activities that exist in nature," says Dr. Almo. "It will also further our understanding of disease and help us identify new targets for drug development."

The leader of the research team is John A. Gerlt, Ph.D., Gutgsell Chair and professor of biochemistry and of chemistry and biophysics at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. Dr. Gerlt and his colleagues have pioneered diverse techniques for more efficiently determining the function of an enzyme by defining its substrate the molecule to which the enzyme docks to start a reaction. Their approaches involve both computational methods to narrow the substrate candidates and direct experimental screening of potential substrates.

For the EFI Glue Grant, Dr. Gerlt has assembled a team of researchers from several disciplines to discover the function of enzymes an effort that begins with determining the structure of an enzyme of interest. The team will then use computers to create a short "hit list" of possible substrates that are most compatible with the structure of this enzyme. Next, scientists with expertise in particular enzyme superfamilies will evaluate the list to pinpoint the substrate, thereby providing direct insight into the enzyme's function. Then, using a range of bacterial model systems, researchers will "knock out" the gene that codes for this enzyme. The manner in which the loss of this enzyme affects the organism will provide further information about the enzyme's function.

Dr. Almo and his colleagues will be responsible for purifying the enzymes and then using x ray crystallography to determine their molecular structure. (X-ray crystallography is a method that reveals the arrangement of atoms within a protein by striking the protein crystal with a beam of x-rays.) Dr. Almo's team includes Ronald D. Seidel, Ph.D., associate in biochemistry and associate director of the Albert Einstein Macromolecular Therapeutics Development Facility.


'/>"/>

Contact: Deirdre Branley
sciencenews@einstein.yu.edu
718-430-3101
Albert Einstein College of Medicine
Source:Eurekalert

Related biology news :

1. California funds UCI basic research on stem cells
2. DOD funds tiny cave camera and iris recognition technology for military, homeland security
3. Apollo Solar Energy funds new $1.5 million CdTe solar research center at NJIT
4. UF gets almost $15 million in federal funds to build research complex to help older adults
5. Stand Up to Cancer funds high-risk/high-reward cancer research by 13 young scientists
6. NIGMS invests in scientific Grand Opportunities with Recovery Act funds
7. NIEHS awards Recovery Act funds to focus more research on health and safety of nanomaterials
8. NIEHS awards Recovery Act funds to address bisphenol A research gaps
9. Recovery Act funds expand studies of stem cell biology
10. Battling cancer with engineering: NCI funds new $13 million cancer research center led by Cornell
11. Wellcome Trust funds dengue fever research in Leuven
Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:
(Date:6/22/2016)... , June 22, 2016  The American College of Medical ... Show Executive Magazine as one of the fastest-growing trade ... 25-27 at the Bellagio in Las Vegas ... highest percentage of growth in each of the following categories: ... companies and number of attendees. The 2015 ACMG Annual Meeting ...
(Date:6/20/2016)... Securus Technologies, a leading provider of ... safety, investigation, corrections and monitoring announced that after ... secured the final acceptance by all three (3) ... Systems (MAS) installed. Furthermore, Securus will have contracts ... by October, 2016. MAS distinguishes between legitimate wireless ...
(Date:6/9/2016)... , June 9, 2016 ... Police deploy Teleste,s video security solution to ensure the safety ... France during the major tournament Teleste, ... communications systems and services, announced today that its video security ... to back up public safety across the country. ...
Breaking Biology News(10 mins):
(Date:6/23/2016)... Md. , June 23, 2016 A person ... from the crime scene to track the criminal down. ... the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) uses DNA evidence ... Sound far-fetched? It,s not. The FDA ... sequencing to support investigations of foodborne illnesses. Put as simply ...
(Date:6/23/2016)... , June, 23, 2016  The Biodesign Challenge ... envision new ways to harness living systems and biotechnology, ... Art (MoMA) in New York City ... 130 participating students, showcased projects at MoMA,s Celeste Bartos ... Paola Antonelli , MoMA,s senior curator of architecture and ...
(Date:6/23/2016)... ... , ... In a new case report published today in STEM CELLS Translational ... lymphedema after being treated for breast cancer benefitted from an injection of stem cells ... this debilitating, frequent side effect of cancer treatment. , Lymphedema refers to ...
(Date:6/23/2016)... NEW YORK , June 23, 2016 ... the trading session at 4,833.32, down 0.22%; the Dow Jones ... the S&P 500 closed at 2,085.45, down 0.17%. Stock-Callers.com has ... INFI ), Nektar Therapeutics (NASDAQ: NKTR ... BIND Therapeutics Inc. (NASDAQ: BIND ). Learn more ...
Breaking Biology Technology: