Navigation Links
Mountain ecosystems scientists to convene at University of Nevada, Reno
Date:6/13/2014

RENO, Nev. The allure of pine forests, majestic granite peaks and rushing rivers has always drawn mankind to mountaintops. The same intrigue drives the work of scientists around the world, many of whom will convene at the University of Nevada, Reno for a multi-day conference on social, biological and environmental systems in mountain regions, especially important as climate and land-use changes affect mountain environments and the communities in them.

The conference, "Mountain Observatories A Global Fair and Workshop on Long-Term Observing Systems of Mountain Social-Ecological Systems," will be July 16-19 at the University's main campus and will feature one-day as well as extended field trips to locations around northern Nevada and the Lake Tahoe, Sierra Nevada region.

The conference is organized by the Mountain Research Initiative (MRI) at the Institute of Geography in Bern, Switzerland, in partnership with the University's Extended Studies program and the DendroLab, which is run by Professor Franco Biondi in the College of Science.

"This is different than a typical conference, because in addition to the field trips, and some traditional format such as keynote speakers, there will be workshops and roundtable discussions to compare projects, instrumentation and systems," Biondi, professor of geography and co-organizer for the event, said.

Biondi currently oversees three National Science Foundation-funded research projects, as well as the statewide lead for the Ecological Change component of a multi-institutional collaboration which has been funded by the National Science Foundation for $15 million over five years and established a comprehensive environmental monitoring system across the Great Basin of Nevada through the Nevada Climate Change Portal.

"This is not the first time scientists will be getting together to talk about mountain observing systems, but it is new on this scale," Biondi said. "MRI chose to have this meeting here because of the University's tradition of field work and research, the innovative observation systems that were recently put in place, and the variety of ecological and social interactions in the region."

The goal of the conference is to move toward a more comprehensive, global mountain observation network by strengthening the ties between existing observation systems. Once researchers come together to exchange ideas, and see what other monitoring networks offer, they can develop common programs, assess priority locations and develop creative financing options.

The workshop portion of the conference will feature sessions where speakers from around the world present state-of-the-art projects regarding mountain observations, together with roundtables where participants work together to develop common solutions.

The fair portion of the conference will feature expositions in which participants explain their observing network or products in a poster session format and side meetings for more in-depth discussions.

More than 140 scientists from around the world are already registered for the event. This includes researchers such as climatologists, meteorologists, hydrologists, ecologists, economists, sociologists, political scientists, anthropologists, historians or other researchers who create long-term datasets at specific sites, or managers involved in existing observing networks focused on mountains or including mountain sites or managers of field stations and transects that generate long-term data.

The event features six keynote speakers on topics ranging from an overview of the relationship of human-environment interactions and best methodologies for observation to data management and sharing, from new opportunities for monitoring weather and weather-related phenomena to climate effects on plant and animal populations.

The four one-day field trips will take participants to various destinations near the University of Nevada, Reno, which is minutes from the base of the Sierra Nevada. One trip will go to Fallen Leaf Lake and Lake Tahoe to see 200-year-old pine trees standing submerged under 100 feet of water and to hear about the several research projects associated with that discovery. Another trip will arrive at 10,700-foot elevation on nearby Mt. Rose with discussions of plant monitoring projects and to see the first western snow survey site. Yet another will focus on active earthquake faults at Lake Tahoe and the tsunamis they have created. The last one will visit sites along the Truckee River with a stop at the Federal Watermaster's Office to discuss research and water allocation issues for the river that starts in the Lake Tahoe basin and ends at Pyramid Lake in Nevada.

To register for the event visit: https://www.cisweb1.unr.edu/cxs/CourseListing.asp?master_id=1979&course_area=CON&course_number=144&course_subtitle=00

For more information go the Mountain Observatories website: http://mri.scnatweb.ch/en/events/fair-and-workshop-on-mountain-observatories.


'/>"/>
Contact: Mike Wolterbeek
mwolterbeek@unr.edu
University of Nevada, Reno
Source:Eurekalert

Related biology news :

1. Expedition to undersea mountain yields new information about sub-seafloor structure
2. CU research shows warming climate threatens ecology at mountain research site west of Boulder
3. Accelerating climate change exerts strong pressure on Europes mountain flora
4. Global warming has driven Europes mountain plants to migrate 2.7 meters upwards in 7 years
5. European mountain plant population shows delayed response to climate change
6. Nitrogen pollution changing Rocky Mountain National Park vegetation, says CU-Boulder-led study
7. IdentiSys acquires the Identification, Security and Presentation Divisions of Mountainland Business Systems, a Utah based reseller
8. Increase in metal concentrations in Rocky Mountain watershed tied to warming temperatures
9. NYBG press publishes final volume of landmark Intermountain Flora series
10. Mountain meadows dwindling in the Pacific Northwest
11. 2001-2002 drought helped propel mountain pine beetle epidemic, says CU study
Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:
(Date:3/27/2021)... ... March 25, 2021 , ... Phlexglobal announced ... Planet Group, has selected Phlexglobal and its innovative regulatory SaaS software, PhlexSubmission, as ... a comprehensive review of five regulatory software companies, with the review team including ...
(Date:3/27/2021)... ... 25, 2021 , ... The 2021 Virtual Conference on Clinical Trial Supply-Europe ... More and more, clinical trial supply conferences are featuring speakers and forums that ... Asymmetrex’s founder and CEO, James L. Sherley, M.D., Ph.D., presented a talk ...
(Date:3/23/2021)... ... March 23, 2021 , ... G-CON Manufacturing (G-CON), the ... by Matica Biotechnology (Matica Bio), a contract development and manufacturing organization (CDMO) specializing ... the cleanroom build out for its new GMP production facility in College Station, ...
Breaking Biology News(10 mins):
(Date:3/27/2021)... ... March 24, 2021 , ... ... Life Sciences and Healthcare firms of all sizes, adds depth to its team ... specialist. Pardillo, who earned his doctorate in computational chemistry from Florida International University ...
(Date:3/27/2021)... ... March 24, 2021 , ... ABI Wellness, ... and reporting approach designed under CEO Mark Watson, today announced a webinar dedicated ... featuring guest speakers Dr. Cameron Clark, Neuropsychologist and Founder of Sharp Thinking, and ...
(Date:3/27/2021)... ... ... The Xtalks editorial team is pleased to announce the launch of the ... joined by editorial team members Ayesha Rashid, Sydney Perelmutter and Mira Nabulsi to discuss ... including insights from industry experts. , The Xtalks Life Science podcast will feature ...
(Date:3/23/2021)... Conn. (PRWEB) , ... March 23, 2021 , ... ... develops solutions for characterizing microbiome populations down to the strain level, recently unveiled ... applications. , Not all microbes are created equal: some are easy to ...
Breaking Biology Technology: