Navigation Links
Mount Sinai researchers discover new way diseases develop
Date:7/8/2010

Researchers from Mount Sinai School of Medicine have identified a previously unknown mechanism by which cells direct gene expression, the process by which information from a gene is used to direct the physical and behavioral development of individuals. The research, which may help scientists gain insight into how muscle and heart diseases develop, is published in the July 8th issue of Nature.

Using a combined approach of structural and molecular biology, a team of researchers led by Ming-Ming Zhou, PhD, Professor and Chair, Structural and Chemical Biology, Mount Sinai School of Medicine, determined that the molecular interactions between proteins are very different than previously thought, and that they play an essential role in the initiation of gene transcription of muscle and the heart. Gene transcription is the first step to gene expression, a cellular process that occurs in response to physiological and environmental stimuli, and is dictated by chemical modifications of the DNA and histones, which are the proteins responsible for packaging the DNA.

Dr. Zhou's team found a new fundamental mechanism in gene transcription through a protein called DPF3b. They learned that DPF3b recognizes gene-activating chemical marks in these histones in a very different way. DPF3b plays a critical role in the copying of genesa crucial part of the transcription processfor muscle growth and heart development.

"This discovery opens new doors in genome biology research, and has broad implications in the field of epigenetics of human biology of health and disease," said Martin Walsh, PhD, Associate Professor, Pediatrics, and Structural and Chemical Biology at Mount Sinai who is also a co-author of the study. "Knowing that there is an additional way our genome is regulated will allow us to understand the molecular basis of certain human disorders that result from dysregulation of gene expression."

Dr. Zhou said that bromodomains, which are housed in proteins, read off cell signals that turn on genes that determine genetic makeup. "This study uncovers that nature has an alternative to bromodomains for gene expression to initiate, providing a new mechanism to help us understand how our muscles and heart grow properly, and what might cause them to grow abnormally," Dr. Zhou said.


'/>"/>

Contact: Mount Sinai Press Office
newsnow@mountsinai.org
212-241-9200
The Mount Sinai Hospital / Mount Sinai School of Medicine
Source:Eurekalert

Related biology news :

1. White Mountain Research Station to host climate change conference
2. Tropical rainforest and mountain species may be threatened by global warming
3. Missouri Botanical Garden mounts milestone 6 millionth herbarium specimen
4. Mounting evidence shows health benefits of grape polyphenols
5. Escherichia coli bacteria transferring between humans and mountain gorillas
6. Mountain caribous ancient ancestry revealed
7. Will large amounts of soil carbon be released if grasslands are converted to energy crops?
8. Mount Sinai Hospital researcher makes stem cell breakthrough
9. Mountain on Mars may answer big question
10. UC Davis launches One Health care for wild mountain gorillas and human neighbors
11. Geoscientists meet to discuss Rocky Mountain geology
Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:
(Date:2/4/2016)... , Feb. 4, 2016 The ... apparently one of the most popular hubs of ... MetaHIT and other huge studies of human microbiota, ... past few years, the microbiome space has literally ... biomedical research. This report focuses on biomedical ...
(Date:2/3/2016)... Feb. 3, 2016 ... of the "Emotion Detection and Recognition ... and Others), Software Tools (Facial Expression, Voice ... Users,and Regions - Global forecast to 2020" ... --> http://www.researchandmarkets.com/research/d8zjcd/emotion_detection ) has announced the ...
(Date:2/2/2016)... , Feb. 2, 2016 Technology Enhancements Accelerate ... an analysis of the digital and computed radiography markets ... , and Indonesia (TIM). ... and market size, as well as regional market drivers ... and discusses market penetration and market attractiveness, both for ...
Breaking Biology News(10 mins):
(Date:2/9/2016)... ... ... The American Academy of Thermology (AAT) has announced that for ... Certification Qualification Course for Technicians via a two part webinar on July 30 and ... review of hardware, software, and camera setup/operations, aligns with the in-person member qualification course ...
(Date:2/9/2016)... , Feb. 9, 2016 This market ... the current and future prospects of the market in ... report include companies engaged in the manufacture of microbiology ... executive summary with a market snapshot providing the overall ... of this report. This section also provides the overall ...
(Date:2/9/2016)... LONDON , Feb. 9, 2016 /PRNewswire/ ... (PTP1B) Inhibitors-Pipeline Insights, 2016", report provides in ... their development activities around the Protein-Tyrosine Phosphatase ... the product profiles in various stages of ... Phase II, Phase III and Preregistration. Report ...
(Date:2/8/2016)... February 8, 2016 ... Limited, an innovation-driven oncology company developing next generation ... toxic, today announced that chairman emeritus of Tata ... in the company as part of the first ... existing investors Navam Capital and Aarin Capital. ...
Breaking Biology Technology: