Navigation Links
More accurate, sensitive DNA test allows early identification of fungus causing WNS
Date:3/13/2013

MADISON, Wis., March 13, 2013 Even after researchers studying White Nose Syndrome (WNS) established that a fungus called Geomyces destructans is at the heart of the devastating disease, detecting it depended largely on finding dead or dying bats.

This month, the journal Mycologia will publish research by a team of U.S. Forest Service scientists and partners identifying additional species of Geomyces and describing development of a highly sensitive DNA-based technique for early identification of Geomyces destructans on bats as well as in soils and on cave walls.

"The significance of the Forest Service's recent research will have an immediate and direct benefit to WNS response at a national scale," according to Katie Gillies, imperiled species coordinator at Bat Conservation International. "This will allow managers to sample soil and substrates to test for the presence of Geomyces destructans, freeing up limited surveillance funds and time. Additionally, this opens the door to examine the use of gene silencing as a control mechanism for this devastating fungus. Research like this, that directly benefits resource managers and guides us to controlling this fungus, is critically needed."

Daniel Lindner, a research plant pathologist with the Forest Service's Northern Research Station, led research that identified 35 species of Geomyces, more than doubling the number of known species. Lindner and partners used that research to develop a DNA-based detection test for Geomyces destructans that is much more sensitive and accurate than previous tests. Forest Service scientists collaborated with the U.S. Geological Survey and the University of Wisconsin for both studies.

"At best, only 5 to10 percent of fungal species on earth have been named and scientifically described," Lindner said. "Developing a specific test for this fungus was difficult because we found that every sample from bats and caves contained a huge diversity of unidentified, unnamed fungi, and these were interfering with detection."

White Nose Syndrome was first identified in Upstate New York in 2006. Since then it has spread to caves throughout the East Coast and killed millions of bats, and it continues to spread.

"White Nose Syndrome is arguably the most devastating wildlife disease we've faced," said Michael T. Rains, Director of the Forest Service's Northern Research Station. "Forest Service scientists are conducting research to halt this disease and save bats, which are so important to agriculture and forest ecosystems."

Scientists identified Geomyces destructans as the cause of WNS in 2012. Conclusively identifying the fungus either on a bat or in soil has been difficult and time consuming because a variety of closely related Geomyces species found where bats hibernate have the potential to cause false positives using previous DNA testing. Previous tests also lacked sensitivity, making it possible to miss the fungus in some samples. The new test is 100-times more sensitive than previous tests and can detect a single spore of the fungus.


'/>"/>

Contact: Jane Hodgins
jmhodgins@gmail.com
651-304-7607
USDA Forest Service - Northern Research Station
Source:Eurekalert

Related biology news :

1. New method provides fast, accurate, low cost analysis of BRCA gene mutations in breast cancer
2. Immunosignaturing: An accurate, affordable and stable diagnostic
3. Why a hereditary anemia is caused by genetic mutation in mechanically sensitive ion channel
4. New study reveals how sensitive US East Coast regions may be to ocean acidification
5. Sodium transporter appears likely target for treating salt-sensitive hypertension
6. The worlds most sensitive plasmon resonance sensor inspired by ancient Roman cup
7. Touch-sensitive plastic skin heals itself
8. Tactile croc jaws more sensitive than human fingertips
9. Ultrasensitive photon hunter
10. Sensitive test helps improve vaccine safety
11. Medbox Developing a Patent Pending Wall-Mounted Biometric Kiosk for Storage of Sensitive Medicine Samples and Supplies for Doctors Offices.
Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:
(Date:4/6/2017)... -- Forecasts by Product Type (EAC), Biometrics, ... (Transportation & Logistics, Government & Public Sector, Utilities / ... Facility, Nuclear Power), Industrial, Retail, Business Organisation (BFSI), Hospitality ... looking for a definitive report on the $27.9bn Access ... ...
(Date:4/5/2017)... 4, 2017 KEY FINDINGS The ... at a CAGR of 25.76% during the forecast period ... primary factor for the growth of the stem cell ... MARKET INSIGHTS The global stem cell market ... and geography. The stem cell market of the product ...
(Date:3/30/2017)... ANGELES , March 30, 2017  On April ... Hack the Genome hackathon at Microsoft,s ... exciting two-day competition will focus on developing health and ... Hack the Genome is the ... been tremendous. The world,s largest companies in the genomics, ...
Breaking Biology News(10 mins):
(Date:9/14/2017)... London UK (PRWEB) , ... September 14, 2017 ... ... the most innovative minds in pharma and biotech at the third annual DrugDev ... collaborative conference that brings together the world’s most progressive clinical research leaders for ...
(Date:9/14/2017)... ... September 14, 2017 , ... ... its extensive experience with Health Economics and Outcomes Research (HEOR) and ‘big data’ ... testing. In 2014, US healthcare spending exceeded $3.0 trillion with nearly 1/3 spent ...
(Date:9/14/2017)... (PRWEB) , ... September 14, 2017 , ... One of ... on Saturday, Sept. 16. , For six hours that day, the GenCure Marrow Donor ... at more than 30 H-E-B grocery stores in San Antonio. , The registration tables ...
(Date:9/14/2017)... ... September 14, 2017 , ... ... and exploratory analytics solutions, today announced that its Anzo Smart Data Lake has ... KMWorld’s list includes technologies and solutions that help organizations succeed in surpassing their ...
Breaking Biology Technology: