Navigation Links
Molecular typesetting -- proofreading without a proofreader
Date:6/23/2009

Researchers at the Universities of Leeds and Bristol (UK) have developed a model of how errors are corrected whilst proteins are being built.

Ensuring that proteins are built correctly is essential to the proper functioning of our bodies, but the 'quality assurance' mechanisms that take place during this manufacturing process are not fully understood.

"Scientists have been puzzled as to how this process makes so few mistakes", says Dr Netta Cohen, Reader at the University of Leeds' School of Computing.

To create a protein, the first step involves copying the relevant gene on our DNA onto a template, called RNA. This copying process is carried out by molecular machines called RNA polymerases.

"The RNA polymerase acts like an old fashioned newsprint typesetter, constructing newsprint by assembling letters one at a time. Similarly, RNA polymerase constructs RNA by reading the DNA and adding new letters to the RNA one at a time," explains Dr Cohen.

There's no way for the RNA polymerase to ensure that the correct letter is always incorporated at the right spot. "Statistically, we would expect to see a hundred-fold more errors than we actually do, so we know that some error correction must be happening. Otherwise, many more proteins in our bodies would malfunction," says Dr Cohen.

Biological experiments have shown that the RNA polymerase slides both forwards and backwards along the RNA sequence it has created. What's more, it has miniature scissors that can then cut out the last few letters of RNA.

So how are errors corrected? Intelligent typesetters would remove the last few letters when they spot an error. The new model suggests how the backward sliding stalls when passing an error, so wrong letters can be snipped off and copying can resume.

"The mechanism we've modelled has only recently been shown to be implicated in proofreading," says Dr Cohen. "In fact, there is more than one identified mechanism for ensuring that genetic code is copied correctly. The challenge now is to find out through a combination of experimental biology and modelling which mechanism is dominant."


'/>"/>

Contact: Dr. Netta Cohen
n.cohen@leeds.ac.uk
44-113-343-6789
University of Leeds
Source:Eurekalert

Related biology news :

1. New molecular regulators of hyperthyroidism and goiter
2. Carnegie Mellon scientists investigate initial molecular mechanism that triggers neuronal firing
3. UC health news: molecular pathway may predict chemotherapy effectiveness
4. New molecular clock from LLNL and CDC indicates smallpox evolved earlier than believed
5. Story ideas from Molecular & Cellular Proteomics
6. Lets talk -- new paradigms in the research of the biomolecular composition of water
7. Scientists unveil structure of molecular target of many drugs
8. Potential new therapeutic molecular target to fight cancer
9. NIH selects LIAI for major study on allergy molecular causes and possible treatments
10. Pennsylvania Hospital surgeon receives grant to develop molecular cardiac surgery
11. Leading cause of death in preemies might be controlled by resetting a molecular switch
Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:
(Date:5/16/2017)... N.J. , May 16, 2017  Veratad Technologies, ... provider of online age and identity verification solutions, announced ... K(NO)W Identity Conference 2017, May 15 thru May 17, ... Regan Building and International Trade Center. ... the globe and in today,s quickly evolving digital world, ...
(Date:4/18/2017)... , April 18, 2017  Socionext Inc., a global expert ... a media edge server, the M820, which features the company,s hybrid ... software provided by Tera Probe, Inc., will be showcased during the ... the NAB show at the Las Vegas ... ...
(Date:4/11/2017)... 2017 Research and Markets has announced the ... to their offering. ... eye tracking market to grow at a CAGR of 30.37% during ... Market 2017-2021, has been prepared based on an in-depth market analysis ... and its growth prospects over the coming years. The report also ...
Breaking Biology News(10 mins):
(Date:10/12/2017)... ... October 12, 2017 , ... ... of a United States multicenter, prospective clinical study that demonstrates the accuracy ... test capable of identifying clinically significant acute bacterial and viral respiratory tract ...
(Date:10/11/2017)... (PRWEB) , ... October 11, 2017 , ... ... any gene in its endogenous context, enabling overexpression experiments and avoiding the use ... with small RNA guides is transformative for performing systematic gain-of-function studies. , ...
(Date:10/11/2017)... and LAGUNA HILLS, Calif. , Oct. ... Cancer Research, London (ICR) and University ... SKY92, SkylineDx,s prognostic tool to risk-stratify patients with multiple myeloma ... MUK nine . The University of Leeds ... partly funded by Myeloma UK, and ICR will perform the ...
(Date:10/10/2017)... CA (PRWEB) , ... October ... ... a development-stage cancer-focused pharmaceutical company advancing targeted antibody-drug conjugate (ADC) therapeutics, today ... of targeted HPLN (Hybrid Polymerized Liposomal Nanoparticle), a technology developed in collaboration ...
Breaking Biology Technology: