Navigation Links
Molecular probes permit doctors to detect diabetic retinopathy before vision fails
Date:9/2/2014

A new study published in the September issue of The FASEB Journal, http://www.fasebj.org, identifies a novel strategy to diagnose the leading cause of blindness in adults, diabetic retinopathy, before irreversible structural damage has occurred. This advance involves quantifying the early molecular changes caused by diabetes on the endothelium of retinal vessels. Using new probes developed by scientists, they were able to distinguish the early molecular development of diabetic retinopathy.

"My goal is to establish a versatile clinical tool that alerts of a disease process right when the first molecular changes take place. This will then provide ample opportunity to act, as opposed to merely acknowledge that there is structural damage that we cannot do anything about," said Ali Hafezi-Moghadam, M.D., Ph.D., a researcher involved in the work from the Center for Excellence in Functional and Molecular Imaging at Brigham and Women's Hospital and Harvard Medical School in Boston, MA. "Here, we have shown it in an important disease, the diabetic retinopathy, but there is no reason to stop there."

Hafezi-Moghadam and colleagues identified a target on the intraluminal surface of the retinal vessels that is expressed at higher levels in diabetes. They found significantly more vascular endothelial growth factor receptor 2 (VEGFR-2) in the diabetic micro-vessels compared to control. They then custom-generated molecular probes and characterized their binding properties. Light-based live imaging was then used to quantify binding interaction. An unexpected finding in this work was that not only was VEGFR-2 higher in the retinas of diabetic animals as well as humans, but the molecule was found in the retinal micro vessels, not in the larger vessels. When the imaging probes were injected into the blood stream of living normal and diabetic animals, they circulated throughout the animal's vasculature. With the help of live imaging of the retinal vessels, it was possible to visualize the interaction of individual probes with their endothelial targets. The probes transiently interacted with the intraluminal surfaces. In comparison, control probes with a surface moiety that does not interact with the inner vascular lumen freely flowed through the retinal micro vessels. Since the probe interaction with the inner vessel wall can be deduced to individual molecular interactions, the information gained from this study provides quantitative knowledge of target molecules in the retinal micro vessels.

"This study should be a huge eye-opener for doctors hoping to prevent eye disease resulting from diabetes," said Gerald Weissmann, M.D., Editor-in-Chief of The FASEB Journal. "This study shows that it is possible to do this, and the next step is to make this accessible at the clinical level. The sooner doctors can detect that their patients might have a vision problem, the more time they have to save someone's sight."


'/>"/>
Contact: Cody Mooneyhan
cmooneyhan@faseb.org
301-634-7104
Federation of American Societies for Experimental Biology
Source:Eurekalert

Related biology news :

1. MARC travel awards announced for GSA: Mouse Molecular Genetics Conference
2. Kalorama Report: Sizable Number of Acquisitions and Joint Ventures in Molecular Diagnostics
3. Team determines structure of a molecular machine that targets viral DNA for destruction
4. From the basics to the cutting edge of molecular biology and genomics in one small book
5. Watching chemistry in motion: Chemical environments mapped using molecular vibrations
6. Yeast meeting to showcase latest breakthroughs in genetics and molecular biology
7. BioForce Nanosciences, Inc. Unveils New Molecular Printer.
8. Molecular mechanisms underlying the prevention of autoim-munity by Roquin revealed
9. New professorship in tissue engineering links molecular engineering, marine biology
10. Molecular snapshots of oxygen formation in photosynthesis
11. Evolution depends on rare chance events, molecular time travel experiments show
Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:
(Date:6/13/2019)... ... June 13, 2019 , ... Global ... exclusively serving the end-to-end clinical and ancillary supply chain management needs of large- ... medical research organizations, today announced it will sponsor a summer education program offered ...
(Date:6/11/2019)... WEST LAFAYETTE, Ind. (PRWEB) , ... June 10, 2019 , ... ... Synchrotron Methods” in the July 2019 issue of AAPS PharmSciTech. The article was published ... A. Smith of Improved Pharma, along with Xiaoming Sean Chen of Purdue University. ...
(Date:6/6/2019)... (PRWEB) , ... June 05, 2019 , ... ... announces the opening of a new network station and service center in Mexico ... and 12th in the world — with more than $1.75 billion in pharmaceutical ...
Breaking Biology News(10 mins):
(Date:6/11/2019)... ... 11, 2019 , ... Veterinary Regenerative Medicine company, VetStem ... announced that their GMP facility for cell production is now approved by the ... is an important milestone for VetStem as it expands into contract cell manufacturing ...
(Date:5/31/2019)... ... May 30, 2019 , ... World Compliance Seminars today ... 08-09, 2019 in Boston, MA. This peer recommended interactive workshop is always selected ... training will kick off with a compendial treatment of Data Integrity fundamentals. After ...
(Date:5/15/2019)... ... May 15, 2019 , ... Milton Hershey School® has named ... his work within the biomedical industry, where he is changing lives by creating solutions ... , “William Harding epitomizes the vision of our founders – Milton and Catherine Hershey ...
(Date:5/7/2019)... ... May 06, 2019 , ... "The new Liquid Nitrogen Best ... being asked to store cellular products being used in adoptive therapy research ... world leaders, who have shared their expertise in building and managing facilities to ...
Breaking Biology Technology: