Navigation Links
Method of studying roots rarely used in wetlands improves ecosystem research
Date:10/13/2011

OAK RIDGE, Tenn. -- A method of monitoring roots rarely used in wetlands will help Oak Ridge National Laboratory researchers effectively study the response of a high-carbon ecosystem to elevated temperatures and levels of carbon dioxide.

Colleen Iversen, ORNL ecosystem ecologist, and an international group of experts, worked to develop a consensus on the use of minirhizotrons, or tiny video cameras that take images of roots, in wetlands. Minirhizotrons are an improvement over previous technology because they don't harm the plants and allow researchers to examine a living root in the context of a soil environment.

"One of the benefits of minirhizotron technology is the ability to track the birth and death of individual roots," said Iversen. "Root activity is integral to plant survival in wetlands that store a substantial amount of carbon in deep soil organic matter deposits but have limited nutrients available for plant uptake and use."

Ultimately, the minirhizotrons will be placed in a black spruce bog in Minnesota, the site for the multi-year experiment SPRUCE, or Spruce and Peatland Responses Under Climatic and Environmental Change. Chambers placed in the site will allow researchers to manipulate air and soil temperatures and levels of carbon dioxide in an intact bog a wetland that accumulates a deposit of dead plant material.

Understanding and improving the capabilities of these mini cameras will help the SPRUCE researchers study fine roots, which are responsible for plant water and nutrient uptake.

"Minirhizotrons are the best way to get at the dynamics of this short-lived and important root population, especially in a long-term experiment like SPRUCE where we can't be too destructive in our soil measurements," Iversen said.

One of the reasons scientists are interested in high-carbon ecosystems like the Minnesota bog is because they cover only three percent of global land surface, but store nearly one-third of terrestrial carbon. If the planet continues to warm, researchers hypothesize that bogs will dry out and more oxygen will be made available for microbial decomposition, which could lead to a massive release of carbon into the atmosphere, resulting in more warming.

Additionally, more precise studies of roots will help researchers effectively model roots and be able to better predict what role they will play in nutrient cycling and storing carbon belowground.


'/>"/>
Contact: Emma MacMillan
macmillanee@ornl.gov
865-241-9515
DOE/Oak Ridge National Laboratory
Source:Eurekalert  

Related biology news :

1. New method cleans up textile industrys most dangerous chemicals
2. MU researchers unveil new method for detecting lung cancer in Nature article
3. Human Gene Therapy expands with robust new methods journal
4. UH researchers work to develop screening method for superbug
5. Rice unveils new method to grow synthetic collagen
6. Novel method for increasing antibiotic yields
7. New imaging method sheds light on cell growth
8. Scientists receive grant to develop new DNA sequencing method
9. Improved method for capturing proteins holds promise for biomedical research
10. New method for making human-based gelatin
11. Scientists develop method to determine order of mutations that lead to cancer
Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:
Related Image:
Method of studying roots rarely used in wetlands improves ecosystem research
(Date:1/19/2017)... and PUNE, India , January 19, 2017 ... "Global Biometric Sensor Market, Opportunities and Forecast, 2014 - 2022," the global ... a CAGR of 9.6% from 2016 to 2022. In 2015, Asia-Pacific ... high-level security for both public and private sectors. ... ...
(Date:1/12/2017)... , Jan. 12, 2017  Trovagene, Inc. (NASDAQ: ... DNA (ctDNA) technologies, today announced that it has signed ... and the Middle East ...  This milestone marks the first wave of international distribution ... urine and blood samples. The initial partners ...
(Date:1/6/2017)... , Jan. 6, 2017  Privately-held CalciMedica, ... studies in healthy volunteers of a novel calcium ... treat acute pancreatitis. Acute pancreatitis, ... a mild disorder, but can be very serious.  In ... and sepsis, where extended hospital stays, time in ...
Breaking Biology News(10 mins):
(Date:1/19/2017)... DUBLIN , Jan 19, 2017 Research ... Market by Profiling Technology, Biomolecules, Cancer Type, Application - Global Opportunity ... ... Report, forecasts that the global market is projected to reach $15,737 ... of 13% from 2016 to 2022. Omic technologies ...
(Date:1/19/2017)... HOUSTON , Jan. 19, 2017 ... formation of its Medical/Clinical Advisory Board.  This new ... who enhance the range and depth of expertise ... its novel prenatal diagnostic tests.  These experts are ... guidance for the company,s product development and commercialization ...
(Date:1/19/2017)... Research and Markets ... has announced the addition of the ... 2025" report to their offering. Report ... provides a detailed analysis on current and future market trends to identify ... market values as the base numbers Key market trends ...
(Date:1/19/2017)... ... January 19, 2017 , ... November Research ... leading biopharmaceutical and medical device manufacturers and regulators, is proud to announce the ... 11-compliant email client designed to provide product vigilance departments with the flexibility and ...
Breaking Biology Technology: