Navigation Links
Medicine residues may threaten fish reproduction

Researchers at Ume University and the Sahlgrenska Academy at the University of Gothenburg, Sweden, have discovered that traces of many medicines can be found in fish that have been swimming in treated waste water. One such medicine, the hormone levonorgestrel, was found in higher concentrations in the blood of fish than in women who take the contraceptive pill. Elevated levels of this hormone can lead to infertility in fish.

The study is published in the journal Environmental Science and Technology. The fish in the study were exposed to treated waste water from three sewage treatment works in Stockholm, Ume and Gothenburg. The study shows that levonorgestrel which is found in many contraceptive pills, including the morning-after pill can impact on the environment and constitutes a risk factor for the ability of fish to reproduce. Levonogestrel is designed to mimic the female sex hormone progesterone and is produced synthetically.

A study from Germany showed very recently that less than a billionth of a gram of levonorgestrel per litre inhibited the reproduction of fish in aquarium-based trials.
"We are finding these levels in treated waste water in Sweden," explains Jerker Fick at the Department of Chemistry at Ume University.

For around ten years it has been known that synthetic oestrogen from contraceptive pills can affect fish that live downstream from sewage treatment works. The new study shows that synthetic progesterone-like hormones in contraceptive pills also carry risks.

The fish in the study were exposed to undiluted waste water, whilst in the natural environment there tends to be a degree of dilution in watercourses. But the study pointed out that there are also watercourses with very little dilution, and probably treatment plants that filter out the hormone less effectively than those included in the study. These findings will help to improve our understanding of which substances need to be removed from waste water.

"If we know how our medicines affect the environment, we will be in a better position to choose environmentally friendly alternatives, though we must always put the health of patients first," says Joakim Larsson at the Sahlgrenska Academy, one of the researchers behind the study.


Contact: Joakim Larsson
University of Gothenburg

Related biology news :

1. New research seeks to enhance quality and security of wireless telemedicine
2. Penn Veterinary Medicine report new strategy to create genetically-modified animals
3. SNM applauds NAS study showing need to restore federal nuclear medicine research funding
4. Gene-targeting pioneer Mario Capecchi shares 2007 Nobel Prize in Medicine
5. Professor Sir Martin Evans wins Nobel Prize for Medicine
6. 3 Columbia University Medical Center faculty elected to Institute of Medicine
7. In the laboratory, green tea proves a powerful medicine against severe sepsis
8. Telemedicine: Health alert via satellite
9. Study of African traditional medicine will begin world-first clinical trial
10. CWRU School of Medicine has evidence vaccine against malaria will reduce disease
11. New clinical trial results show how personalized medicine will alter treatment of genetic disorders
Post Your Comments:
(Date:6/22/2016)... , June 22, 2016 On Monday, the ... to industry to share solutions for the Biometric Exit ... Customs and Border Protection (CBP), explains that CBP intends ... departing the United States , in ... to defeat imposters. Logo - ...
(Date:6/20/2016)... Securus Technologies, a leading provider of ... safety, investigation, corrections and monitoring announced that after ... secured the final acceptance by all three (3) ... Systems (MAS) installed. Furthermore, Securus will have contracts ... by October, 2016. MAS distinguishes between legitimate wireless ...
(Date:6/15/2016)... , June 15, 2016 ... market report titled "Gesture Recognition Market by Application Market - Global ... 2016 - 2024". According to the report, the  global ... billion in 2015 and is estimated to grow ... 48.56 billion by 2024.  Increasing application ...
Breaking Biology News(10 mins):
(Date:6/27/2016)... San Diego, CA (PRWEB) , ... June 27, 2016 , ... ... mClinical solutions for clinical trials, announced today the Clinical Reach Virtual Patient ... and their care circle with the physician and clinical trial team. , Using the ...
(Date:6/24/2016)... TOKYO , June 24, 2016  Regular discussions on ... to take place between the two entities said Poloz. ... in Ottawa , he pointed to the ... and the federal government. ... Poloz said, "Both institutions have common economic goals, why not ...
(Date:6/23/2016)... (PRWEB) , ... June 23, 2016 , ... ... is pleased to announce the launch of their brand, UP4™ Probiotics, into Target ... over 35 years, is proud to add Target to its list of well-respected ...
(Date:6/23/2016)... Lawrence, MA (PRWEB) , ... June 23, 2016 ... ... the Peel Plate® YM (Yeast and Mold) microbial test has received AOAC Research ... test platform of microbial tests introduced last year,” stated Bob Salter, Vice President ...
Breaking Biology Technology: