Navigation Links
Medical researchers make important research link between active ingredient in saffron and MS
Date:11/4/2011

Medical researchers at the University of Alberta have discovered that an active ingredient in the Persian spice saffron may be a potential treatment for diseases involving neuroinflammation, such as multiple sclerosis.

Chris Power and a team of researchers in the Faculty of Medicine & Dentistry recently published their findings in the peer-reviewed publication, The Journal of Immunology.

"We found there is a compound in saffron, known as crocin, that exerts a protective effect in brain cell cultures and other models of MS. It prevented damage to cells that make myelin in the brain," Power said. "Myelin is insulation around nerves. MS is characterized by inflamed brain cells that have lost this protective insulation, which ultimately leads to neurodegeneration."

Power noted they are not close to a clinical trial stage yet, but the finding is still exciting.

It has been known in the research community for years that crocin protected neurons in certain situations, but Power and his team wanted to delve further into this area.

His team discovered that inflammation and a specific type of cell stress are closely linked and lead to neurodegeneration and inflammation which cause cells to lose their protective coating a process known as demyelination. In experiments conducted by Power and his colleagues, the use of crocin suppressed both inflammation and this specific type of cell stress, resulting in decreased neurological impairment in lab models and cell cultures with MS.

"There are still many questions to be answered about how crocin exerts these neuroprotective effects, but this research highlights a potential treatment role for crocin in diseases involving chronic neuroinflammation something that had not been recognized until now," says Power.

He explained the research demonstrates a new mechanism in MS, provides new potential drug targets in the future, and helps explain why physicians see inflammation in MS.

The team's research also revealed that this specific type of cell stress, called the unfolded protein response, may be caused by an ancient virus that was introduced into the DNA of early humans. This particular cell stress is found at high levels in MS brain lesions.

"We all have this ancient virus in our DNA, but for some reason it is excessively turned on in MS," says Power. "We are doing more research investigating this link."

Power has been investigating this specific area for six to seven years.


'/>"/>

Contact: Raquel Maurier
raquel.maurier@ualberta.ca
780-492-5986
University of Alberta Faculty of Medicine & Dentistry
Source:Eurekalert

Related biology news :

1. Athens Regional Medical Center Upgrades to Omnicell G4 Platform for Supply and Medication Management
2. Manufacturing microscale medical devices for faster tissue engineering
3. Lung regeneration closer to reality with new discovery by Weill Cornell Medical College researchers
4. 21 Fellows inducted into American College of Medical Informatics
5. Researchers at NYU Langone Medical Center review the microbiome and its possible role in cancers
6. BioCrossroads Invests in Medical Device Company Developing Revolutionary Absorbable Stent
7. Cell biologist Chris A. Kaiser to lead NIHs National Institute of General Medical Sciences
8. Virginia Tech biomedical engineers announce child football helmet study
9. Genomic sequence and comparison of 2 macaques reveal new insights into biomedical research
10. Medical College of Wisconsin researchers show molecule inhibits metastasis
11. Organic medical imaging system to detect disease and track medication
Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:
(Date:1/12/2017)... and PUNE, India , January 12, 2017 ... Forecasts, 2015 - 2022," projects that the global biometric technology market is expected to ... 2016 to 2022. Continue Reading ... ...      ...
(Date:1/6/2017)... , Jan. 5, 2017  Delta ID Inc., ... iris scanning technology for automotive at CES® 2017. Delta ... GNTX ) to demonstrate the use of iris scanning ... and authenticate the driver in a car, and as ... the driving experience. Delta ID and Gentex ...
(Date:12/22/2016)... 22, 2016 SuperCom (NASDAQ:   ... for the e-Government, Public Safety, HealthCare, and Finance sectors announced today ... been selected to implement and deploy a community-based supportive services program ... California , further expanding its presence in the state. ... This new program, which ...
Breaking Biology News(10 mins):
(Date:1/19/2017)... ... January 19, 2017 , ... ... software solutions for pharmaceutical research and development (R&D), today announced the launch ... data analysis and interpretation for the rapidly evolving field of precision medicine. ...
(Date:1/19/2017)... ... January 18, 2017 , ... ... Health (NIH) to update its Data Sharing Policy. Specifically, the nation’s leading informatics ... applications subject to the existing policy. AMIA recommended that NIH earmark funding for ...
(Date:1/19/2017)... 18, 2017  Northwest Biotherapeutics, Inc. (OTCQB: NWBO) ("NW ... therapies for operable and inoperable solid tumor cancers, announced ... Officer of NW Bio, will present at the Phacilitate ... the Hyatt Regency Hotel in Miami, Florida ... session entitled "New Therapeutic Approaches – Expanding the Reach ...
(Date:1/18/2017)... , Jan. 18, 2017   Boston Biomedical , ... designed to target cancer stemness pathways, will feature data ... napabucasin, at the 2017 ASCO Gastrointestinal Cancers Symposium, held ... . Napabucasin is an orally-administered investigational ... STAT3. i Cancer stem cells (CSCs) possess the ...
Breaking Biology Technology: