Navigation Links
Medical researcher's discovery may explain how certain cancers develop
Date:5/27/2010

A Florida State University College of Medicine researcher has discovered a new interaction between a cell signaling system and a specific gene that may be the cause of B-cell lymphoma. The finding suggests a similar interaction could be occurring during the development of other types of cancer, leading to further understanding of how cancer works and how it might be stopped.

Yoichi Kato, an assistant professor in the Department of Biomedical Sciences, and his lab team found that the gene known in scientific shorthand as BCL6 can inhibit one of the pathways cells use to transmit signals to other cells. Called the Notch signaling pathway, it's an important mechanism for cells to control gene regulation.

"There are very few molecules that we know directly inhibit Notch signaling," Kato said. "So that is why the interaction, and our finding, is very interesting to people in many areas cancer specialists, neuroscientists, and many others."

Kato's team produced a paper outlining the findings that was published in the journal Developmental Cell, and Kato recently presented the paper at an international conference in Cold Spring Harbor, N.Y., for scientists studying early development of vertebrates.

Kato and his researchers have focused on the Notch signaling pathway's role in vertebrate early development. In their study, they found that when BCL6 inhibits the Notch signaling pathway during the early stages of embryo development, the alignment of the embryo's internal organs is affected, which can lead to a congenital disorder.

However, the Notch signaling pathway, which creates the equivalent of a molecular highway across a cell's membrane, is involved in many types of cell-to-cell interaction, including neuron development, stem cell differentiation and apoptosis (programmed cell death).

The fact that BCL6 regulates the Notch signaling pathway could be important for any cellular process where Notch plays a role, including the formation of many cancers. BCL6 is a gene that, when mutated in certain ways, can lead to several types of B-cell lymphoma. B-cell lymphomas, including both Hodgkin's and non-Hodgkin's lymphomas, occur when B-cells, which produce antibodies to fight infections, mutate and become cancerous.

With more study of the interaction between the Notch signaling pathway and the BCL6 gene, scientists may be able to better understand how these cancers form. Kato and his lab plan to further investigate the interaction's role in neural development, as well as how the interaction could affect stem cell formation.


'/>"/>

Contact: Doug Carlson
doug.carlson@med.fsu.edu
850-645-1255
Florida State University
Source:Eurekalert  

Related biology news :

1. UM receives 5th consecutive Howard Hughes Medical Institute grant for science education
2. ScriptRx and DigitalPersona Team Up to Secure Emergency Room and Urgent Care Electronic Medical Records
3. Scientists use biomedical technique to image marine worm
4. Historic medical conference finds Bolivar may have been poisoned
5. Concord Medical Enters Agreement to Acquire Four Radiotherapy and Diagnostic Imaging Centers in Hebei Province
6. Winner Medical Group inc. Prices Offering of 1,380,000 Shares of Common Stock
7. Depression symptoms increase during medical internship
8. Chronix Biomedicals serum DNA assays monitor disease activity and treatment response in MS
9. Electronic medical records may accelerate genome-driven diagnoses and treatments
10. UT Southwesterns BioCenter driving biotech, medical innovation in North Texas
11. UT Southwestern student receives fellowship from Howard Hughes Medical Institute
Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:
Related Image:
Medical researcher's discovery may explain how certain cancers develop
(Date:2/1/2016)... ( www.wocketwallet.com ) announces the launch of a new video featuring singer, ... Las Vegas , where Joey appeared at the Wocket booth to ... , where Joey appeared at the Wocket booth to meet and greet ... the Consumer Electronics Show (CES2016) in Las Vegas , ... --> --> The video is ...
(Date:1/22/2016)... , January 22, 2016 /PRNewswire/ ... announced the addition of the  "Global ... their offering. --> http://www.researchandmarkets.com/research/4lmf2s/global_behavioral ... the  "Global Behavioral Biometric Market 2016-2020" ... Research and Markets ( http://www.researchandmarkets.com/research/4lmf2s/global_behavioral ) ...
(Date:1/20/2016)... Jan. 20, 2016  Synaptics Incorporated (NASDAQ: ... solutions, today announced sampling of S1423, its newest ... and small screen applications including smartwatches, fitness trackers, ... round and rectangular shapes, as well as thick ... with moisture on screen, while wearing gloves, and ...
Breaking Biology News(10 mins):
(Date:2/4/2016)... (PRWEB) , ... February 04, 2016 , ... ... latest GC-MS and triple quad LC-MS, host live demos and poster sessions, and ... conference and exhibition. The conference takes place March 6 to 10 at the ...
(Date:2/4/2016)... MENLO PARK, Calif. , Feb. 4, 2016 /PRNewswire/ ... "Company"), a biopharmaceutical company focused on the development and commercialization ... at the 18 th Annual BIO CEO & ... a.m. EST in New York, NY . ... will provide an update on the ongoing clinical trial of ...
(Date:2/4/2016)... Feb. 4, 2016 Sinovac Biotech Ltd. ("Sinovac" ... provider of biopharmaceutical products in China ... board of directors received on February 4, 2016 a ... a consortium comprised of PKU V-Ming ( Shanghai ... Ltd., CICC Qianhai Development ( Shenzhen ) ...
(Date:2/3/2016)... , Feb. 3, 2016   ViaCyte, ... with the first pluripotent stem cell-derived islet replacement ... in clinical-stage development, today announced that ViaCyte and ... Companies of Johnson & Johnson, have agreed to ... into ViaCyte.  The agreement provides ViaCyte with an ...
Breaking Biology Technology: