Navigation Links
Mechanism discovered which aids Legionella to camouflage itself in the organism

The feared Legionella pneumophila bacteria is responsible for legionellosis, an infectious disease that can lead to pneumonia. In order to infect us, this pathogen has developed a complex method enabling it to camouflage itself and go unnoticed in our cells, thus avoiding these acting against the infectious bacteria.

Research led by the Basque biosciences research centre, CIC bioGUNE, in which teams from the National Institute of Health (NIH) of the USA and the National Supercomputation Centre in Barcelona (BSC) have also participated, has described for the first time a mechanism that aids this bacteria to camouflage itself in human cells. The research, recently published in the prestigious PLOS Pathogens, resolved the structure of the SidD protein of the Legionella pneumophila, involved in the interference of cell processes during infection.

Legionella, which lives in stagnant water, gains access to our organism through the respiratory tract, when we inhale contaminated microscopic drops of water. Once there, the cells of the immune system phagocytise it (that is, they 'swallow' it up), but are not able to destroy it. This is due to the fact that the bacteria manages to manipulate the host cell to go unnoticed inside it and multiply itself without being destroyed.

The strategy of the bacteria involves releasing about 300 proteins into the cell, which in turn act on the host proteins in order to avoid being recognized as an infectious agent and thus go unnoticed during the time necessary to multiply itself.

One of these proteins, concretely the Legionella SidD protein, regulates a chemical modification involved in the process of intracellular camouflage. It is precisely the function of this protein which the research by CIC bioGUNE, the NIH and the BSC has described. Once the Legionell has managed to multiply itself, the SidD protein unblocks cellular processes which favour the advance of the infection.

New targets

"Legionella pneumophila is an organism which, during millions of years of evolution, has learnt to manipulate our proteins to its own benefit in order to thus favour the infection", explained CIC bioGUNE researcher, Aitor Hierro. "Knowing how it does this", he added, "can help us to manipulate our proteins to our own benefit".

The discovery of the mechanism enabling the bacteria to survive and develop within our cells could give rise to the discovery of new findings. According to Mr. Hierro, "this knowledge not only reveals new targets that can be used for designing inhibitors, but also shows us molecular mechanisms that can be readapted and used, for example, in the selective transport of molecules for therapeutic use".


Contact: Irati Kortabitarte
Elhuyar Fundazioa

Related biology news :

1. SUMO wrestling cells reveal new protective mechanism target for stroke
2. Laminopathies: Key components in the disease mechanism identified
3. Study uncovers mechanism for how grapes reduce heart failure associated with hypertension
4. BUSM study reveals novel mechanism by which UVA contributes to photoaging of skin
5. Important fertility mechanism discovered
6. Epigenetic changes shed light on biological mechanism of autism
7. Mechanism of mutant histone protein in childhood brain cancer revealed
8. Researchers find novel mechanism regulating replication of insulin-producing beta cells
9. New study identifies unique mechanisms of antibiotic resistance
10. UMass Amherst researchers reveal mechanism of novel biological electron transfer
11. Series of studies first to examine acupunctures mechanisms of action
Post Your Comments:
(Date:11/12/2015)... Nov. 12, 2015  A golden retriever that stayed ... dystrophy (DMD) has provided a new lead for treating ... the Broad Institute of MIT and Harvard and the ... . Cell, pinpoints a protective ... the disease,s effects. The Boston Children,s lab of ...
(Date:11/10/2015)... , Nov. 10, 2015  In this ... the basis of product, type, application, disease ... in this report are consumables, services, software. ... are safety biomarkers, efficacy biomarkers, and validation ... report are diagnostics development, drug discovery and ...
(Date:11/4/2015)... York , November 4, 2015 ... a new market report published by Transparency Market Research "Home ... Growth, Trends and Forecast 2015 - 2022", the global home ... US$ 30.3 bn by 2022. The market is estimated ... forecast period from 2015 to 2022. Rising security needs ...
Breaking Biology News(10 mins):
(Date:11/24/2015)... Switzerland (PRWEB) , ... November 24, 2015 , ... ... plant and the environment are paramount. Insertion points for in-line sensors can represent ... has developed the InTrac 781/784 series of retractable sensor housings , which ...
(Date:11/24/2015)... , Nov. 24, 2015 HemoShear ... on discovering drugs for metabolic disorders, announced today ... to its Board of Directors (BOD). Mr. Watkins ... of Human Genome Sciences (HGS), and also served ... Jim Powers , Chairman and CEO ...
(Date:11/23/2015)... , Nov. 24, 2015 Women with a ... CT exams face a higher risk of lung cancer than ... presented next week at the annual meeting of the Radiological ... --> --> Lung nodules ... classified as solid or subsolid based on their appearance on ...
(Date:11/23/2015)... The royalty-free a greement a llows ... 112 low- and m iddle-i ncome ... --> The Medicines Patent Pool (MPP) today announced its ... with Bristol-Myers Squibb for daclatasvir, a novel direct-acting antiviral that ... virus.  The royalty-free licence will enable generic manufacture of daclatasvir ...
Breaking Biology Technology: