Navigation Links
Maternal health problems in Myanmar widespread
Date:12/23/2008

The maternal health care issues facing women in eastern Burma (also known as Myanmar) are widespread and underreported, according to surveys by researchers at the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health. The researchers report that more than 88 percent of women had a home delivery during their last pregnancy and displaced women were more than 5 time as likely to receive no antenatal care. Human rights violations, like displacement and forced labor, were are also widespread and found to affect access to maternal health care. The findings are published in the December 2008 issue of PLoS Medicine.

"Health indicators are poor and human rights violations are widespread in eastern Burma," said Luke Mullany, PhD, MHS, lead author of the study and assistant professor with the Bloomberg School's Department of International Health. "In conflict-affected regions of Burma, research indicates that infant and child mortality rates are higher than other areas due to widespread exposure to gross human rights violations."

According to the study, among the women surveyed, 60 percent expressed an unmet need for modern contraceptives and nearly 95 percent gave birth without the assistance of a skilled attendant or someone with labor and delivery training. Many of these women displayed signs of poor nutrition and very few received vital iron supplements or utilized insecticide-treated bed nets. In addition, more than half of the women were diagnosed as anemic and more than 7 percent tested positive for the malaria parasite.

For the study, the researchers conducted two-stage cluster sampling surveys among reproductive-aged women (15 to 45). The surveys were conducted between September 2006 and January 2007 in the Shan, Mon, Karen, and Karenni communities in eastern Burma. Mullany, along with colleagues, documented access to antenatal care, skilled attendants at birth, postnatal care, family planning services and recent exposure to human rights violations such as displacement and forced labor. With the assistance of trained survey workers who spoke the local language and were known in the community, researchers explored strategies to increase access to maternal health interventions and examined the estimated coverage of maternal health services prior to the Mobile Obstetric Maternal Health Workers (MOM) Project, a program designed to assist in providing maternal health care in eastern Burma.

"The indicators and coverage estimates provided here are strikingly worse than the already low national estimates for Burma that have been provided by various institutional reports," said Chris Beyrer, MD, MPH, senior author of the study and professor with the Bloomberg School's Department of Epidemiology. "Increased access to antenatal, labor delivery and newborn care services in eastern Burma is essential to improve the overall health status of these vulnerable populations. In addition, considerable political, financial and human resources are necessary to improve access to care. There needs to be emphasis on maternal and more comprehensively, reproductive health services in health programs targeting these communities."


'/>"/>

Contact: Natalie Wood-Wright
nwoodwri@jhsph.edu
410-614-6029
Johns Hopkins University Bloomberg School of Public Health
Source:Eurekalert

Related biology news :

1. New technology aims to reduce maternal and neonatal deaths
2. Exposing chicks to maternal stress leads to long-term reproductive success
3. Researchers block damage to fetal brain following maternal alcohol consumption
4. Egg P bodies protect maternal gene messages
5. Family ties that bind: Maternal grandparents are more involved in the lives of their grandchildren
6. Evolutionary biology research on plant shows significance of maternal effects
7. Wasp genetics study suggests altruism evolved from maternal behavior
8. How healthy are Americas coasts?
9. TGen, Scottsdale Healthcare, Mayo Clinic study new drug to stimulate immune system of cancer victims
10. F-MARC funds more soccer and health research
11. Modified gene targets cancer cells a thousand times more often than healthy cells
Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:
(Date:3/24/2017)... Controller General of Immigration from Maldives Mr. Mohamed Anwar and ... international IAIR Award for the most innovative high security ePassport and eGates  ... ... Maldives Immigration Controller General, Mr. Mohamed Anwar ... right) have received the IAIR award for the "Most innovative high security ...
(Date:3/22/2017)... 2017   Neurotechnology , a provider of ... announced the release of the SentiVeillance 6.0 ... facial recognition using up to 10 surveillance, security ... The new version uses deep neural-network-based facial detection ... utilizes a Graphing Processing Unit (GPU) for enhanced ...
(Date:3/20/2017)... Pa. , March 20, 2017 PMD ... 2.0 personal spirometer and Wellness Management System (WMS), a ... Founded in 2010, PMD Healthcare is a Medical ... with a mission dedicated to creating innovative solutions that ... life. With that intent focus, PMD developed the first ...
Breaking Biology News(10 mins):
(Date:5/24/2017)... ... May 24, 2017 , ... ... for the Mid-Atlantic chapter of the Healthcare Businesswomen’s Association (HBA). Nominated ... HBA Mid-Atlantic chapter board meets in person once each quarter and holds monthly ...
(Date:5/24/2017)... Ebola resurfaces in the Democratic Republic of Congo ... reported, a new analysis of the Ebola gene polymerase Replikin ... 2014 and 2017 outbreaks of the disease.  ... the 2014 outbreak. An analysis of the latest data showed ... which again precedes the current outbreak in the DRC. Sequence ...
(Date:5/23/2017)... ... May 22, 2017 , ... NetDimensions has been ranked as ... Globe™ for Corporate Learning, 2017. , Aragon Research defines Leaders as organizations who ... perform against those strategies. NetDimensions’ ranking as a Leader due to its strengths ...
(Date:5/23/2017)... ... , ... Bacterial biofilms, surface adherent communities of bacteria that are encased in ... poisoning and catheter infections to gum disease and the rejection of medical implants. ... per year, there is currently a paucity of means for preventing their formation or ...
Breaking Biology Technology: