Navigation Links
Marginal lands are prime fuel source for alternative energy
Date:1/16/2013

Marginal lands those unsuited for food crops can serve as prime real estate for meeting the nation's alternative energy production goals.

In the current issue of Nature, a team of researchers led by Michigan State University shows that marginal lands represent a huge untapped resource to grow mixed species cellulosic biomass, plants grown specifically for fuel production, which could annually produce up to 5.5 billion gallons of ethanol in the Midwest alone.

"Understanding the environmental impact of widespread biofuel production is a major unanswered question both in the U.S. and worldwide," said Ilya Gelfand, lead author and MSU postdoctoral researcher. "We estimate that using marginal lands for growing cellulosic biomass crops could provide up to 215 gallons of ethanol per acre with substantial greenhouse gas mitigation."

The notion of making better use of marginal land has been around for nearly 15 years. However, this is the first study to provide an estimate for the greenhouse gas benefits as well as an assessment of the total potential for these lands to produce significant amounts of biomass, he added.

Focusing on 10 Midwest states, Great Lakes Bioenergy researchers from MSU and the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory used 20 years of data from MSU's Kellogg Biological Station LTER Site to characterize the comparative productivity and greenhouse gas impacts of different crops, including corn, poplar, alfalfa and old field vegetation.

They then used a supercomputer to identify and model biomass production that could grow enough feedstock to support a local biorefinery with a capacity of at least 24 million gallons per year. The final tally of 5.5 billion gallons of ethanol represents about 25 percent of Congress' 2022 cellulosic biofuels target, said Phil Robertson, co-author and MSU professor of crop, soil and microbial sciences.

"The value of marginal land for energy production has been long-speculated and often discounted," he said. "This study shows that these lands could make a major contribution to transportation energy needs while providing substantial climate and if managed properly conservation benefits."

This also is the first study to show that grasses and other non-woody plants that grow naturally on unmanaged lands are sufficiently productive to make ethanol production worthwhile. Conservative numbers were used in the study, and production efficiency could be increased by carefully selecting the mix of plant species, Robertson added.

"With conservation in mind, these marginal lands can be made productive for bioenergy production and, in so doing, contribute to avoid the conflict between food and fuel production," said Cesar Izaurralde, PNNL soil scientist and University of Maryland adjunct professor.

Additional benefits for using marginal lands include:

  • New revenue for farmers and other land owners
  • No indirect land-use effects, where land in another part of the globe is cleared to replace land lost here to food production
  • No carbon debt from land conversion if existing vegetation is used or if new perennial crops are planted directly into existing vegetation


'/>"/>

Contact: Layne Cameron
Layne.cameron@cabs.msu.edu
517-353-8819
Michigan State University
Source:Eurekalert  

Related biology news :

1. Scientists uncover strong support for once-marginalized theory on Parkinsons disease
2. Landsat senses a disturbance in the forest
3. Desert Research Institute scientist selected to help guide next USGS, NASA Landsat Mission
4. Tigers roar back: Good news for big cats in 3 key landscapes
5. CCNY landscape architect offers storm surge defense alternatives
6. Indirect effects of climate change could alter landscapes
7. Degraded military lands to get ecological boost from CU-led effort
8. Climate change increases stress, need for restoration on grazed public lands
9. UK butterfly populations threatened by extreme drought and landscape fragmentation
10. Cellular landscaping: Predicting how, and how fast, cells will change
11. Global economic pressures trickle down to local landscape change, altering disease risk
Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:
Related Image:
Marginal lands are prime fuel source for alternative energy
(Date:5/16/2017)... , May 16, 2017   Bridge ... health organizations, and MD EMR Systems , ... development partner for GE, have established a partnership ... Portal product and the GE Centricityâ„¢ products, including ... EMR. These new integrations will ...
(Date:4/18/2017)... 2017  Socionext Inc., a global expert in SoC-based imaging and ... the M820, which features the company,s hybrid codec technology. A demonstration ... Probe, Inc., will be showcased during the upcoming Medtec Japan at ... the Las Vegas Convention Center April 24-27. ... Click here for an ...
(Date:4/11/2017)... 11, 2017 Crossmatch®, a globally-recognized leader ... today announced that it has been awarded a ... Activity (IARPA) to develop next-generation Presentation Attack Detection ... "Innovation has been a driving force within Crossmatch ... allow us to innovate and develop new technologies ...
Breaking Biology News(10 mins):
(Date:5/23/2017)... ... ... Cambridge Semantics , the leading provider of Big Data management and analytics ... in Boston May 23-25 with a featured speaker and solution demos of its ... also a finalist for the Best of Show award. , James LaPointe, Managing Director ...
(Date:5/22/2017)... (PRWEB) , ... May 22, 2017 , ... Stratevi, a ... expanded to the East Coast. It has opened an office in downtown Boston at ... are finding it increasingly more important to generate evidence on the value they provide, ...
(Date:5/22/2017)... ... May 22, 2017 , ... Cancer diagnostics and pathology workflow ... at the Association for Pathology Informatics Annual Summit at the Wyndham ... its Cancer Diagnostic Cockpit and Consultation Portal, Inspirata will present research it led ...
(Date:5/21/2017)... ... May 20, 2017 , ... CNSDose is a ... and error process by finding the right antidepressant faster. CNSDose speeds recovery ... relationship through a personalized approach to treatment. , A peer-reviewed and ...
Breaking Biology Technology: