Navigation Links
Making metabolism more inefficient can reduce obesity
Date:10/3/2008

In a discovery that counters prevailing thought, a study in mice has found that inactivating a pair of key genes involved in "fat-burning" can actually increase energy expenditure and help lower diet-induced obesity. These unusual findings, appearing this week in the JBC, might lead to some new roads in weight-loss therapy.

Humans and other warm-blooded animals need to continually "burn fat" in order to maintain body temperature, and it's currently believed that an individual's fat-burning capacity, or thermogenic potential, is connected with obesity risk; that is, people with more thermogenic potential are less likely to become obese. In fact, bodybuilders and dieters looking to burn fat commonly use thermogenic supplements like ephedra.

In theory, lowering thermogenesis should increase the chances of obesity, but Leslie Kozak and colleagues at Pennington Biomedical Research Center found that this may not be the case. They knocked-out two thermogenic genes in mice, Ucp1 (mitochondrial uncoupling protein) and Gdm (glycerol 3-phosphate dehydrogenase) and then fed the mice a high-fat diet while rearing them at a cool 20 C (68 F).

Surprisingly, these mice were actually quite resistant to obesity, which resulted from the mice turning on backup heat generators, so to speak. Lacking Ucp1 and Gdm, genes that have been designed for the efficient production of heat, mouse white fat cells activated alternate, and more inefficient, fat burning pathways. In this case, though, inefficiency is beneficial, as the mice had to burn more fat than normal to stay warm (by analogy you burn more wood by warming your house with an open fire then with a well designed wood stove).

Importantly, after spending 10 weeks at 20 C the mice retained these alternate pathways even after transferring to 28 C (82 F), suggesting their bodies had adapted to the change. Thus, Kozak and colleagues note, fat burning does not necessarily require making thermogenesis easier; by making it harder and forcing the body to use inefficient methods to stay warm, the same goals can be reached.


'/>"/>

Contact: Nick Zagorski
nzagorski@asbmb.org
301-634-7366
American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology
Source:Eurekalert

Related biology news :

1. Coal and black liquor can produce energy from papermaking
2. Another type of nanotube, a how-to guide to making bamboo-structured carbon nanotubes
3. GBIF making the search for biodiversity research resources easier
4. Making sense of antisense microRNAs
5. Is that sea otter stealing your lunch -- or making it?
6. LSU scientist finds evidence of rain-making bacteria
7. Making sure the wonder materials dont become the wonder pollutant
8. Findings a step toward making new optical materials
9. Research suggests parts of UK could be too hot for wine-making by 2080
10. Research suggests parts of UK could be too hot for wine making by 2080
11. Small protein may have big role in making more bone and less fat
Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:
(Date:2/1/2016)... 1, 2016  Today, the first day of American ... to develop a first of its kind workplace health ... Watson. In the first application of Watson ... IBM ), and Welltok will create a new offering ... cognitive analytics, delivered on Welltok,s health optimization platform. The ...
(Date:1/25/2016)... Pa. , Jan. 25, 2016   Unisys Corporation ... system at John F. Kennedy (JFK) International Airport, New ... Protection (CBP) identify imposters attempting to enter the ... not belong to them. pilot testing of the ... initially at three terminals at JFK during January 2016. --> ...
(Date:1/21/2016)... , January 21, 2016 ... to a new market research report "Emotion Detection and ... Others), Software Tools (Facial Expression, Voice Recognition and ... - Global forecast to 2020", published by MarketsandMarkets, ... expected to reach USD 22.65 Billion by 2020, ...
Breaking Biology News(10 mins):
(Date:2/4/2016)... -- Spherix Incorporated (Nasdaq: SPEX ) -- an intellectual property development ... property, today provided an update on the Company,s cases ... Texas and announcing that those ... Re-examination ("IPR") proceedings that VTech and Uniden filed ... on only certain claims of two of the patents ...
(Date:2/3/2016)... 2016   ViaCyte, Inc ., a leading, ... stem cell-derived islet replacement therapy for the treatment ... announced that ViaCyte and Janssen Biotech, Inc., one ... Johnson, have agreed to consolidate the assets of ... provides ViaCyte with an exclusive license to all ...
(Date:2/3/2016)... , Feb. 3, 2016 New ... more than $1 million for researchers in ... on health-related research that demonstrates exciting potential.   ... of funding for the New Jersey Health Foundation Research ... members at these educational institutions— Princeton University, Rutgers ...
(Date:2/3/2016)... Mass. , Feb. 3, 2016  Silk Therapeutics, Inc., ... financing round. Silk Therapeutics has now raised a total of ... made by the company. The Series A2 round was led ... Massachusetts , with participation from new investors Lear Corporation ... Sheri and Roy P. Disney ; Richard Sackler , ...
Breaking Biology Technology: