Navigation Links
MU scientists 'see' how HIV matures into an infection
Date:10/1/2008

COLUMBIA, Mo. After improving the sensitivity of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR), researchers at the University of Missouri actually watched the HIV-1 protease mature from an inactive form into an active infection. This process has never been directly visualized before. The findings appear today in the journal Nature.

"We actually saw the process occur," said Chun Tang, assistant professor of biochemistry in the MU School of Medicine. "This is something that has never been done before. We now understand more about the maturation process. We hope this will be a stepping stone to intervening before the infection progresses."

The HIV-1 protease is responsible for releasing the essential building blocks of an infective HIV-1 viral particle, the culprit of AIDS. The HIV-1 protease is one of the primary targets of therapeutic treatment. However, the viral enzyme is constantly mutating in an effort to gain drug resistance.

"HIV-1 protease is not an active enzyme when it is first expressed in cells. It has to be activated to do its job," Tang said. "What we were able to see is how it self-activates from an immature form when the virus is not infective into a mature form when the virus gains infectivity."

Tang and his colleagues used a novel NMR method called paramagnetic resonance relaxation enhancement and were able to see the temporary joining of two halves of HIV-1 protease precursor, something that had not been accessible before using conventional techniques.

The researchers discovered that the 'tail,' or the flanking amino acid residues, of the HIV-1 protease precursor go through a temporarily formed tunnel where the tail is cut off. At this point, the protease becomes active, the maturation process proceeds, and the virus becomes infective.

"The more we understand about the virus, especially about the maturation into infection, the more we can do to identify novel therapeutics," Tang said.


'/>"/>

Contact: Jennifer Faddis
Faddisj@missouri.edu
573-882-6217
University of Missouri-Columbia
Source:Eurekalert

Related biology news :

1. UK scientists working to help cut ID theft
2. Scientists show that mitochondrial DNA variants are linked to risk factors for type 2 diabetes
3. Comet probes reveal evidence of origin of life, scientists claim
4. Scientists link fragile X tremor/ataxia syndrome to binding protein in RNA
5. Male elephants get photo IDs from scientists
6. Scientists retrace evolution with first atomic structure of an ancient protein
7. Muscle mass: Scientists identify novel mode of transcriptional regulation during myogenesis
8. Carnegie Mellon scientists develop nanogels that enable controlled delivery of carbohydrate drugs
9. Clemson scientists shed light on molecules in living cells
10. Scientists tackle mystery mountain illness
11. T. rex quicker than Becks, say scientists
Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:
(Date:6/22/2016)... BETHESDA, Md. , June 22, 2016  The American ... by Trade Show Executive Magazine as one of ... Summit on May 25-27 at the Bellagio in ... based on the highest percentage of growth in each of ... number of exhibiting companies and number of attendees. The 2015 ...
(Date:6/20/2016)... , June 20, 2016 Securus ... justice technology solutions for public safety, investigation, corrections ... the prisons involved, it has secured the final ... (DOC) facilities for Managed Access Systems (MAS) installed. ... additional facilities to be installed by October, 2016. ...
(Date:6/9/2016)... Paris Police Prefecture and ... ensure the safety of people and operations in several locations ... Teleste, an international technology group specialised in broadband ... its video security solution will be utilised by ... across the country. The system roll-out is scheduled for the ...
Breaking Biology News(10 mins):
(Date:12/2/2016)... ... December 02, 2016 , ... In anticipation ... and lumbar disc production, company President, Jake Lubinski will be traveling to Switzerland ... AxioMed disc in Bern, Lucerne, and Zurich to discuss the benefits of a ...
(Date:12/2/2016)... OAKS, Calif. , Dec. 2, 2016 Amgen ... AGN ) today announced the submission of a Marketing ... ABP 215, a biosimilar candidate to Avastin ® (bevacizumab). ... application submitted to the EMA. "The submission ... as Amgen seeks to expand our oncology portfolio," said ...
(Date:12/2/2016)... , ... December 01, 2016 , ... ACEA Biosciences, Inc. ... Phase I/II clinical trials for AC0010 at the World Conference on Lung Cancer 2016, ... an update on the phase I/II clinical trials for AC0010 in patients with advanced ...
(Date:12/2/2016)... (PRWEB) , ... December 01, 2016 , ... ... Computational Science Symposium (CSS) and the popularity of US Single Day Events (SDE) ... place in early Summer 2018, in Raleigh, NC. Topics of the pharmaceutical and ...
Breaking Biology Technology: